How Many Does This Cake Feed

Decorating By deetmar Updated 11 Jul 2011 , 11:59pm by CWR41

deetmar Posted 9 Jul 2011 , 3:30am
post #1 of 17

A friend and I are having an argument on how servings will this feed for a weeding, including the top tier. All cakes will be baked ina two" pans Each board will be made of 1/2" foamcore.

The cake is fourth tier square. The bottom tier will be made of 2 15" cakes each torted and filled and on their own boards.

The third tier will be 2 12" cakes each torted and filled on their own boards

The second tier will be 2 9" cakes each torted and filled on their own boards

The top tier will be 2 6" cakes each torted and filled on their own boards.

We would love to see what everyone comes up with for servings.
Don't forget the top tier will not be saved and will be served to the guests.
Thanks

16 replies
deetmar Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 12:00pm
post #3 of 17

When I did the calculatr thingy, by the way, thank you so much for that, I have never seen it before, anyway, It came up with 121.5 servings, then if you take that X2 since there will be two layers in each tier, it comes up with 243. servings.

If you use Earlene's numbers

a 6" serves 12
9" serves 27
12" serves 60
15" serves 96

For a total of 197 and take that X 2 comes up with a total servings of 394 since each tier will hold two individual cakes.

This is what I don't understand about serving charts, how can everybody come up with different numbers? Anybody else want to give it a try?

mfoxx9 Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 12:44pm
post #4 of 17

I got 243 using the calculator. I think Earlene's chart already assumes a 4" cake, and uses larger serving sizes than Wilton, so 197 is the estimate from that chart, not 394.

MikeRowesHunny Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 12:48pm
post #5 of 17

I don't understand why you are separating each tier with a board in between the layers - or have I read that wrongly? Anyhoo, moot point as it's still the equivalent of a 4in deep square cake, so I make it

15in = 112 servings
12in = 72 servings
9in = 40 servings

= 224 total (square cakes are really easy to work out - just divide the squared no. by 2 for a standard serving size of a 4in deep tier).

Hate Earlene's charts, unless you like giving away free cake!

If you are double barrelling the cakes (so each tier is 8+in tall), then it's 448 servings.

sherry_lyn Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 1:02pm
post #6 of 17

Seems odd to seperate each layer, but ok... so instead of a 1"x2"x4"(ish) serving you'll end up with 2"x2"x2"(ish) servings. Either way, Wilton serving chart including the top tier would be 242 servings.

leah_s Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 2:04pm
post #7 of 17

agree with sherry. why do you want to put each layer on a separate board? That's really going to be confusing to whoever is cutting the cake.

kakeladi Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 2:16pm
post #8 of 17

The way you worded your ? makes it hard to understand icon_sad.gif

Various quots from responders:...........I don't understand why you are separating each tier with a board in between the layers..........Hate Earlene's charts, unless you like giving away free cake!.......

Have to agree w/the above^^^.

IF everyone would agree that the Wilton wedding chart should be/is an 'industry standard' there would not be so much confussion!
A 1x24x 'wedding serving' is *the same* amount of cake as a 2x2x2 party 'slice'!
Using the Wilton wedding chart for *square cakes* the 15" serves 125; the 12" = 72; the 9"=35 and the 6"=18 for a total of 250 then you double that.

CWR41 Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 2:49pm
post #9 of 17

242 is correct. Sorry my numbers were for round... didn't catch that it's for a "fourth tier square".

MikeRowesHunny Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 3:09pm
post #10 of 17

I wasn't counting the top tier, as the OP said not to!

sherry_lyn Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 3:33pm
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeRowesHunny

I wasn't counting the top tier, as the OP said not to!




OP said "Don't forget the top tier will not be saved and will be served to the guests."

carmijok Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 4:19pm
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

agree with sherry. why do you want to put each layer on a separate board? That's really going to be confusing to whoever is cutting the cake.




Each tier has it's own board for stacking purposes is what I'm reading it to be. I'd hate to stack that much cake on top of each other without any support underneath.

sherry_lyn Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 5:27pm
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

agree with sherry. why do you want to put each layer on a separate board? That's really going to be confusing to whoever is cutting the cake.



Each tier has it's own board for stacking purposes is what I'm reading it to be. I'd hate to stack that much cake on top of each other without any support underneath.




The way OP worded it leads some of us to believe she is putting each 2" layer on it's own cake board... that's why we have questioned it. Obviously no one stacks a 4 tier cake without any cake boards at all... or at least it should be obvious. It's just that "usually" there would be cake boards for each TIER, not each 2" layer.

deetmar Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 11:51pm
post #14 of 17

Each layer is seperated because they are different flavors and fillings, but want the 4" deep tiers. There will be supports, believe me I support very well. I use either the SPS system or we use a combination of pVC and plates for the bottom two tiers and bubble t''s for the second to the top.

Most of my cakes I use 3" pans, unless the bride wants the tiers divided for more flavor options, then I use the 2" pans.

We sever the top tier on all of our cakes and offer our brides a 6" round on their anniversary for an additonal $16. I have found that I always have batter left to make these cakes without having to make a new batch, and this way they don't have to worry about freezing the top tier, and getting it home on their wedding night, to much other stuff to worry about. If I have time I decorate it, if not I don't, and the bride doesn't get a choice in how it's decorated. This also give me a way to try new techniques and/or designs.

This is our last year making wedding cakes, I guess we are getting to old to carry big cakes.

It's funny how we all come up with different numbers.

cakestyles Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 12:11am
post #15 of 17

So you're cutting them 2x2x2? Each layer is separated by a board but 2 layers will equal a 4" high tier, correct?


**So the 15" tier...each layer will be cut 2x2x2...7 times across by 7 times will give you approx 49 servings each layer so 98 servings for the 15" tier.


The 12"....cut 6 times across by 6 times will give you 36 servings each layer so 72 servings for the 12" tier.

**The 9"...cut approx 4 times across by 4 will give you 16 servings each layer so 32 servings for the 9" tier.

The 6"...cut 3 times across by 3 will give you 9 servings each layer so 18 servings for the 6" tier.

I get 220 2x2x2 slices of cake.

**I always round down on uneven numbered tier sizes i.e. 9 and 15...it works out because of the servings lost due to supports.

deetmar Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 11:22pm
post #16 of 17

I guess I never thought of rounding down instead of up, but it makes total sense. Most serving charts to count for odd sized cakes, so I usually take the difference between the two evens 1/2 it and then add it to the lower size.

It would be nice if we could come up with a standard cake chart for all sizes of cake, i.e. even and odd, 2", 3", 4" tall. It makes it so difficult for getting the right amount, and I think we all end up givine away free cake to make sure there is enough.

When I first started I only used 3" pans, torted and filled once, then I figured that it wasn't the right amount of filling for the heighth of the cake, so I found it easier to bake 2" tort fill each indidividually then in the middle of the two. Now I don't know what the right answer is. I guess it's easier to go with the easiest at the time.

This has been a good discussion, really has me thinking!

Thanks

CWR41 Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 11:59pm
post #17 of 17

You could make your own chart...

for round cakes: Half diameter = radius. Radius squared (times itself) x Pi (3.14) = surface square inches. Surface square inches divided by two (for 2" long serving) = servings total.

Or, you can enter your own specifications into Metria's cake calculator and let it do the math for you.

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