Is It Possible To Delivery A 4 Tier Stacked Cake

Decorating By MerlotCook Updated 7 Jul 2011 , 10:26pm by kakeladi

MerlotCook Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 4:41pm
post #1 of 19

already assembled? The size is 14", 12", 10", and 8". My husband will be going with me, so he can carry it in, but I've never made a cake this large, most are 3 tiers so I'm a bit nervous. I have a 16" round 1/2" thick masonite board to carry it on. I use SPS. Thanks!!

18 replies
jason_kraft Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 4:45pm
post #2 of 19

It can be done, but whenever possible we deliver the cake with tiers in separate boxes and assemble on-site.

dmo4ab Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 4:48pm
post #3 of 19

Sure. I've made and delivered one. I borrowed a friend's van so it could slip right in and out easily. Of course, I only had about a mile to go, but I think it would have been ok even further. I did use a 1/2 inch dowel through the whole cake for stability and had a plywood base.

FleurDeCake Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 4:55pm
post #4 of 19

I deliver all of my cakes fully assembled and stacked. you need to be sure to have a sturdy base Plywood is best, and use a center dowel thru the center all the way down thru each tier.I have delivered 4 tier cakes 30 miles away with no problem.

bakingpw Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 6:11pm
post #5 of 19

I always delivered cakes fully stacked/decorated. I will say however, that I always allowed a 3-4" difference between layers because I find the cake tiers are more stable. Also, instead of a wooden base, a triple foam drum as a base. That way, a sharpened dowel all the way through all layers into/thru the base, helps for the stability. I never had a cake fall/tilt in over 20 years, so I can vouch for this method. Good luck!

kneenah Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 6:17pm
post #6 of 19

I delivered a 4 tier cake and got to the place crying cuz my fondant was cracking.. lol.. i wouldnt risk it unless u have a van or suv to deliver it

kearniesue Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 6:21pm
post #7 of 19

I use SPS too, and no center support (it isn't needed with SPS). I usually deliver stacked and don't have any issues. I think the only issue would be that the cake is going to he heavy... As long as you have a good, strong board to put it on and muscles for carrying it, you'll be golden!

Good luck!

Karen

leah_s Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 6:22pm
post #8 of 19

You'll be fine with SPS. If you can lift it, can take it prestacked.

QueenOfSweets Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 6:26pm
post #9 of 19

I use SPS and delivered a four-tier 8-10-12-14 fully assembled to a location that was 45 miles from my cake studio. It was covered with sugarpaste leaves and acorns, and not a single one moved - so you know it rode well to not have displaced anything. Like Leah said, if you can lift it you can do it!

inspiredbymom Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 6:31pm
post #10 of 19

I use the cakestacker system and have delivered four and five tier cakes. We have curvy pothole filled gravel roads and curvy country roads around here to deliver on and I haven't had any problems. Actually, the only problem that I have had was with the matching sheet cakes on the last order. I put them on Wilton fancy type boards and they were junk and flexed too much. I had to fix them at the hall. Back to foam core or plywood for those! However, I wouldn't trade my stacker for the world!

Jess155 Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 6:34pm
post #11 of 19

I delivered a six tier stacked with SPS. My DH and I were able to lift it and carry it short distances, but for long distances we used a rolling cart at the venue. That sucker was heavy, but it made it!

louanne Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 6:35pm
post #12 of 19

i have only delivered one cake not fully stacked, as long as it can be lifted i stack it. the only time i had to deliver one unstacked was a 6 tier that i did not have help with delivery, i traveled with it as two three tiered cakes and stacked them together when i arrived. i use sps most of the time or dowels depending on size and structure of cake and have never had any trouble.

MerlotCook Posted 7 Jul 2011 , 8:40pm
post #13 of 19

Thanks for the replies...he has assured me he can lift it, as long as it's not over 150 lbs- he should be fine!

Darlene Posted 7 Jul 2011 , 8:50pm
post #14 of 19

I delivered this one myself to the 7th floor of a hotel for my niece's wedding! It was a little smaller as it's 6,8,10 and 12 inches. We had to travel over 250 miles to get to the wedding too! I did assemble about 30 miles from the venue and had no issues with the delivery.


http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1737803/1751746

SPODN Posted 7 Jul 2011 , 9:17pm
post #15 of 19

what is sps

JenTwirl Posted 7 Jul 2011 , 9:33pm
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by inspiredbymom

I use the cakestacker system and have delivered four and five tier cakes. We have curvy pothole filled gravel roads and curvy country roads around here to deliver on and I haven't had any problems. Actually, the only problem that I have had was with the matching sheet cakes on the last order. I put them on Wilton fancy type boards and they were junk and flexed too much. I had to fix them at the hall. Back to foam core or plywood for those! However, I wouldn't trade my stacker for the world!




Cake stackers is the BEST investment you can possible make! Worry free delivery!!

iris219 Posted 7 Jul 2011 , 9:52pm
post #17 of 19

can sps be used for any shaped cakes? Or are they only best used with round cakes?

tonedna Posted 7 Jul 2011 , 10:05pm
post #18 of 19

I have delivered up to 6 tiers stacked. They can be heavy. They need to be moved
completely straight. Drive slowly and be careful on turns. If you are not sure better do it in 2 pieces. Like I said...it can get really heavy.
Edna icon_smile.gif

kakeladi Posted 7 Jul 2011 , 10:26pm
post #19 of 19

..........The size is 14", 12", 10", and 8". ............I have a 16" round 1/2" thick masonite board to carry it on. I use SPS...........

I haven't read all the replies so maybe I'm saying something already mentioned.
This is a *tall tower* accident waiting to happen.
Your base board isn't really big/wide enough for this tower icon_sad.gif Yes, it's sturdy enough but this cake will be top heavy - it can easily sway/tip if you have to make a tight turn or sudden stop.
What kind of roads? what kind of driver? how far is the drive? what kind of traffic will be encountered? will it be hot and humid?
All those things must be factored into the descision. Personally I would not chance it - I'd take it in 2 sections - even using SPS.
Now, having said that, yes, it's probably possible to do but do you really want that much stress?

someone said...........always allowed a 3-4" difference between layers because I find the cake tiers are more stable............

Yes, yes, yesicon_smile.gif That is what I was meaning about your set up being a 'tower' and tower ackes are not stable.

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