Very New Newbie With A Couple Of Questions!

Decorating By AlexandraJoe Updated 6 Jul 2011 , 2:12pm by carmijok

AlexandraJoe Posted 5 Jul 2011 , 2:43pm
post #1 of 10

Hi all,

It's my daughter's third birthday in two weeks and I am making her a Rapunzel cake (as in Tangled) with my Dolly Varden cake tin.

I have a couple of questions. I am going to use fondant for the skirt, so what should I put underneath it? Buttercream or royal icing? (I told you I was new at this). Will buttercream harden nicely enough to give my fondant a good finish? Or, do I even need to put anything under it?

Secondly, I am going to use a stencil for the underskirt - and was going to use royal icing but could I paint it instead? That would look more authentic to Rapunzel's dress (and frankly, might be easier for me). Do stencils work well with edible paint?

Lastly, should I do the doll's bodice while she is in the cake, or should I do her first and then put her in the cake? It's a proper Rapunzel doll I'm using, not a cake topper.

Thanks for your help!

9 replies
FACSlady Posted 5 Jul 2011 , 3:00pm
post #2 of 10

First, put a smooth layer of buttercream on the cake and chill it until the buttercream is hard. You need the buttercream so that the fondant will have something to stick to. After you take it out of the fridge, spray the buttercream with a little bit of water or wait for just a couple of minutes for the outside of the buttercream to warm up just enough for the fondant to be able to stick to it. One piece of advice - be sure to quickly cut off most of the extra fondant that will pool at the bottom so that it doesn't drag down and tear the rest.

Stencils take quite a bit of practice, so if you're comforatble with painting, I'd do that after the forndant is one th cake. I did the bodice after I put the figure on the cake so as not to mar the surface, but others with more experience might advise you otherwise. Good luck!

carmijok Posted 5 Jul 2011 , 3:06pm
post #3 of 10

Royal icing will dry very hard. Use buttercream or ganache. I just did a barbie cake (in my photos) and just matched the skirt to the bodice that was on the doll, but had I made the bodice, I would have probably added it after I put the doll in. If you can paint, then I would paint. I embossed the underskirt (which was just buttercream) with a stamp...didn't even think about painting it...duh! ;D
Have fun!

AlexandraJoe Posted 5 Jul 2011 , 3:11pm
post #4 of 10

Well actually I was thinking about embossing it and that would look really lovely, too. I just haven't been able to find any embossing tools that give me the right look with the flowers, whereas I found a PERFECT stencil.

I've been shopping online though - there aren't many really good cake decorating shops where I live.

With my fondant, I'm using two colours, lavender for the underskirt and purple for the overskirt. Should I buy pre-coloured fondant since I'm a newbie? Or should I try to colour it myself?

For the bodice I was thinking about just buying some chiffon or tulle and making one myself - possibly doing a fondant bodice will be beyond me for my first try ... but I do plan to do quite a few practice runs first, for both skirt and bodice.

Sam_paggers Posted 5 Jul 2011 , 3:29pm
post #5 of 10

personally buy pre-coloured if its quite new to you. However, colouring fondant is easy with gel colours and can be added when you work the fondant prior to rolling out.

I think for the bodice either a chiffon or fondant finish would look fab but to match colours better, perhaps both in fondant....don't over think it and worry, just enjoy..... like you said lots of time to practise and i am sure it's going to look great icon_smile.gif
sam xx

carmijok Posted 5 Jul 2011 , 3:48pm
post #6 of 10

First of all, don't forget to shop in the scrapbooking section of your local hobby store...Michaels, Hobby Lobby, etc. That's where I find a lot of stamps, stencils, etc. That's where I found the stamp I used for my Barbie doll dress...there were actually several on one sheet! Also, the clay making area has a lot of cool stuff that you can apply to fondant (or buttercream) decor as well. I

It's up to you if you want to color fondant or not. It's less expensive if you do it yourself...just make sure to use the best gel color...I like Americolor's (available at Hobby Lobby).

Try covering the bodice with fondant...you can play with it to see if you like it...it's not permanent and kind of fun really. If it doesn't work out, just take it off and do something else

If you like your stencil, then try it! I used a stencil for a teapot cake, but I used buttercream over it, not paint. If I were to paint over a stencil I think I'd use a sponge to dab the gel over it so as not to bleed. But then I've not done that technique before so again it's up to you and I know you'll practice first, right? icon_wink.gif
Just have fun with it. Your daughter will love whatever you do.

AlexandraJoe Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 4:04am
post #7 of 10

GREAT advice thank you so much! I never thought of going to the hobby section - such a good idea and heaps and heaps of cheap stuff around.

I was thinking of using a sponge if I painted - but then buttercream will probably be a bit easier I'd say.

Also, after I've rolled out the fondant (and I've had this problem before) how do I get rid of the cornstarch that is left on it from rolling it out? I don't want the skirt to look dusty haha.

Also another question (sorry) I've seen a Dolly Varden with a wavy skirt, it's hard to describe. Her skirts falls in kind of pleats or folds - it looks beautiful. How would I do that? Is it moulding or is it the cake tin?

carmijok Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 4:34am
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexandraJoe

GREAT advice thank you so much! I never thought of going to the hobby section - such a good idea and heaps and heaps of cheap stuff around.

I was thinking of using a sponge if I painted - but then buttercream will probably be a bit easier I'd say.

Also, after I've rolled out the fondant (and I've had this problem before) how do I get rid of the cornstarch that is left on it from rolling it out? I don't want the skirt to look dusty haha.

Also another question (sorry) I've seen a Dolly Varden with a wavy skirt, it's hard to describe. Her skirts falls in kind of pleats or folds - it looks beautiful. How would I do that? Is it moulding or is it the cake tin?




To get rid of the cornstarch wet a paint brush with vodka or Everclear and brush it all over the fondant to take the cornstarch off. It dries quickly.
I am not familiar with the Dolly Varden. I know that you can make folds in your fondant to give it a draped look.
Also, I think painting would be easier. But practice and see which works best for you! Good luck!

AlexandraJoe Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 12:48pm
post #9 of 10

Thanks again - I do think you're right, I'll paint the transfer (do a practice run first!) and see how I go. I think sponges is the way to go.

As for the drapes / pleats, I have NO idea how to go about it and honestly think it might be beyond me as I'm such a beginner. There are a couple of tutorials here on it that I'll look through to see how I go.

Thanks for the tip about getting the cornstarch off - that's great! Vodka - who'd have thought that. I wonder how that was discovered!

carmijok Posted 6 Jul 2011 , 2:12pm
post #10 of 10

Actually vodka, Everclear or clear lemon extracts are used to apply luster dusts and other colors. They dry quickly so that your fondant won't melt. If you are painting on your fondant, use them like you would water in water color painting. It helps smooth and lighten your gel colors and if you want to use powdered color, then you can use the vodka to make a 'paint'. Just don't use too much or they will be runny. But even that's OK because the stuff evaporates so you can still use your color. Get one of those little cheap white plastic artists palettes at the hobby store to mix your stuff in. Be sure and post your picture after you make your cake!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%