Cake Slips But While In The Customers Home Am I Responsible?

Decorating By Lon6523 Updated 4 Jul 2011 , 4:56pm by costumeczar

Lon6523 Posted 3 Jul 2011 , 1:41pm
post #1 of 17

Ok customer picks up cake at 12:00 pm and I explained that the cake can not be in unleveled and leveled it in her car for her because cakes slip. I get a call that cake slips of off the board at 5:30 its a friend of a friend and the friend was supposed to pay me now its the next day are they not going to pay me because they think I'm responsible?

16 replies
leah_s Posted 3 Jul 2011 , 1:50pm
post #2 of 17

1. You must be paid in full before the cake leaves your hands. No $, no cake.
2. Repeat #1.
3. The cake should be sitting in its box, on non-skid on the floor of the vehicle.
4. You can always skewer the cake to the bottom board if you're worried.
5. This was a one tier cake?

DH2008 Posted 3 Jul 2011 , 1:59pm
post #3 of 17

Always paid in full before the cake leaves your possession & remind people if they're picking cake up that you are NOT responsible for it once it's gone. thumbs_up.gif

Ursula40 Posted 3 Jul 2011 , 2:03pm
post #4 of 17

Rule nr 1
No money no cake
Rule nr 2
I have a photo of cake before it is picked up
Rule nr 3
I take it to the car and place it on an anitslip mat
Rule nr 4 It has to be on a level surface, I don't care if they have to empty the boot to do it, no empty (and clean) boot, no cake
Rule nr 5
As soon as they start to drive, it's THEIR responsibilty, not mine

They do not pay for delivery, their problem, NOT MINE!!!

terrylee Posted 3 Jul 2011 , 2:48pm
post #5 of 17

That's 4 1/2 hours later......?????? it is not your responsibility. Yeh....1st rule....no money no cake...
...sorry this had to happen to you....

bakerliz Posted 3 Jul 2011 , 3:25pm
post #6 of 17

I hate to beat a dead horse, but no money, no cake. You might have just learned an expensive lesson, but it's any consolation, I often learn my lessons the hard way too icon_sad.gif

Lon6523 Posted 3 Jul 2011 , 11:40pm
post #7 of 17

Thank you all for your replies. I am learning this the hard way. They were friends but I'll never do it that way again. I did finally get paid after I made a phone call reminder.

tokazodo Posted 3 Jul 2011 , 11:51pm
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

1. You must be paid in full before the cake leaves your hands. No $, no cake.
2. Repeat #1.
3. The cake should be sitting in its box, on non-skid on the floor of the vehicle.
4. You can always skewer the cake to the bottom board if you're worried.
5. This was a one tier cake?




Leah, when you skewer the cake to the bottom, it's just like a dowel in a wedding cake right? Do you just use a kabob skewer?

Thanks!

What a brilliant idea! thumbs_up.gif

leah_s Posted 4 Jul 2011 , 1:24am
post #9 of 17

Yep. I don't think it really does anything, though. Not really. Makes me feel better.

Jess155 Posted 4 Jul 2011 , 2:49am
post #10 of 17

I'm confused as to how the cake slipped off the board. I've never had that happen. If it was a mistake that you made in the structure, I'd refund a bit of the money for your mistake. My 2 cents.

sweettreat101 Posted 4 Jul 2011 , 5:18am
post #11 of 17

I agree you need to get paid when they pick up the cake. No money no cake. You might not get your money out of this one. Not your fault but it depends on if they are honest. If they didn't pay me I wouldn't do business with them in the future.

costumeczar Posted 4 Jul 2011 , 12:44pm
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Yep. I don't think it really does anything, though. Not really. Makes me feel better.




Hahaha! Yeah, I don't think it does anything to do that either. I don't use center dowels unless it's some kind of a structure that needs the big center pipe bolted to the board and going through al the tiers.

If the cake starts to fall over a regular dowel will fall over too unless it's anchored really deeply into the cake baord. Like, bolted in. Even if it is, the cake can still slide through the dowel and rip itself to pieces if it really wants to slide off a board.

It sounds like the cake the OP is talking about was manhandled a little (or a lot), so a center dowel wouldn't really matter.

AnotherCaker Posted 4 Jul 2011 , 3:06pm
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Yep. I don't think it really does anything, though. Not really. Makes me feel better.


I think it helps, absolutely. But not with room temp cake. If that cake is BC glued down to the drum, and it's chilled thru, and it's skewered thru the drum itself...it's pretty solid.

ReneeFLL Posted 4 Jul 2011 , 3:19pm
post #14 of 17

Did you glue the cake down onto the board/drum with buttercream or something? If not, you should always do this. I am taking a cake to a party tonight. I am only walking about 6 houses down and I will still do this.

cakesnglass Posted 4 Jul 2011 , 4:29pm
post #15 of 17

This was happening at a bakery I was working at - we realized the girl was setting up cakes wrong. Not sure how you set up your cakes but I was taught you always flip the bottom layer onto your board. Top of the baked cake is always on the board. Never use the bottom of (pan) on the board. The pan releases can make your cake slid on a smooth surface plate. A little buttercream on the board helps to secure. Hope it makes sense...

artscallion Posted 4 Jul 2011 , 4:49pm
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesnglass

This was happening at a bakery I was working at - we realized the girl was setting up cakes wrong. Not sure how you set up your cakes but I was taught you always flip the bottom layer onto your board. Top of the baked cake is always on the board. Never use the bottom of (pan) on the board. The pan releases can make your cake slid on a smooth surface plate. A little buttercream on the board helps to secure. Hope it makes sense...




Great info about flipping the cake, cakesnglass! But I've never understood the reasoning for securing with a little buttercream. To me, that just seems like you're greasing it up for a good slide. My experience has been that buttercream = slide whereas rough , textured, slightly sticky cake surface against matte cardboard = no slide.

Of course, if you mean a dab of buttercream between the cardboard and the glass/metal/ceramic cake plate, I use a small square of those rubberized no-skid pads you use under area rugs between the cardboard and the cake plate

costumeczar Posted 4 Jul 2011 , 4:56pm
post #17 of 17

When I put the lowest cake board on the bottom drum I attach it by using loops of packing tape in an "x" on the drum. That sucker won't move after that.

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