Just Shoot Me.

Baking By KayMc Updated 2 Jul 2011 , 3:28pm by LindaF144a

KayMc Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 1:31am
post #1 of 11

I made Macmom's Creme Brulee cake recipe tonight. It called for a LOT of ingredients, as it starts with two boxes of cake mix, and many other ingredients. It took FOREVER to cook: double what the Wilton chart suggested. I made a 10 x 15" rectangle, and it looked beautiful when I took it out of the oven. I cooled it ten minutes in the pan, and then flipped it out on the cooling rack. Immediately it started to fall. I am so angry, as I have to rebake this tomorrow. This cake was done - I used a thick skewer and it finally came out dry. I am so mad that this cake is falling......

10 replies
LKing12 Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 1:43am
post #2 of 11

Sorry this happened to you. Last week I had a 15 inch square fall and I used rose nails. Sometimes I think the humidity is a factor in baking cakes.

kakeladi Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 1:54am
post #3 of 11

Was the cake *level* when you flipped it over? If there was any hump that is what caused it to fall apart.

KayMc Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 2:09am
post #4 of 11

Yes, the cake was level before flipping, or at least that's how I'm remembering it. I don't have a crater in the cake, but a gradual inversion in the middle. No crater at all, so I don't think it's underbaked. I'm going to try to level off the higher edges once the cake has cooled, and see how that works. icon_cry.gif

gatorcake Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 2:26am
post #5 of 11

Underbaking is not the only reason cakes will fall after out of the oven--I only start with this because it seems to be the most common explanation offered. Given the tester came out clean it is more likely that the cake simply lacked the requisite structure to support itself.

Was tweaking a yellow cake recipe to try and create a French Vanilla Cake. Everything looked good, tester was clean, rose to the top of the 2 inch high round, took it out. Looked over, 5 mins it was down 1/4 of inch, a few mins more was down 1/2 inch, by 10 mins had collapsed to 1 inch -- fell by 50%. I cut it open to look at it, it was completely cooked--it simply could not support itself.

The hot air that helps it to rise will keep it up in the oven but once it begins to cool, if it cannot support itself it will fall.

mena2002 Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 3:47am
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorcake

Underbaking is not the only reason cakes will fall after out of the oven--I only start with this because it seems to be the most common explanation offered. Given the tester came out clean it is more likely that the cake simply lacked the requisite structure to support itself.

Was tweaking a yellow cake recipe to try and create a French Vanilla Cake. Everything looked good, tester was clean, rose to the top of the 2 inch high round, took it out. Looked over, 5 mins it was down 1/4 of inch, a few mins more was down 1/2 inch, by 10 mins had collapsed to 1 inch -- fell by 50%. I cut it open to look at it, it was completely cooked--it simply could not support itself.

The hot air that helps it to rise will keep it up in the oven but once it begins to cool, if it cannot support itself it will fall.




thumbs_up.gif

Stephy42088 Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 4:02am
post #7 of 11

I just baked 2 half sheet cakes of the creme brulee cake and didn't have any problems, did you reduce the sugar? I'm no expert by any means but i thought that sometimes having to much sugar can cause them to sink or fall?

LindaF144a Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 2:17pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorcake

Underbaking is not the only reason cakes will fall after out of the oven--I only start with this because it seems to be the most common explanation offered. Given the tester came out clean it is more likely that the cake simply lacked the requisite structure to support itself.

Was tweaking a yellow cake recipe to try and create a French Vanilla Cake. Everything looked good, tester was clean, rose to the top of the 2 inch high round, took it out. Looked over, 5 mins it was down 1/4 of inch, a few mins more was down 1/2 inch, by 10 mins had collapsed to 1 inch -- fell by 50%. I cut it open to look at it, it was completely cooked--it simply could not support itself.

The hot air that helps it to rise will keep it up in the oven but once it begins to cool, if it cannot support itself it will fall.




Was this from a mix or scratch?

BrandisBaked Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 2:36pm
post #9 of 11

*BANG*

icon_lol.gif

Sorry your cake fell, hopefully the next one will be better.

I had this happen to me the other day. I doubled a recipe that always turns out well, but because it was doubled, I don't think I mixed it well enough (did it at home in a small mixer) - I am pretty certain that was the problem.

Next time, I am going to prepare the batches seperately and then combine them instead of trying to do it all in one batch.

gatorcake Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 3:05pm
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorcake

Underbaking is not the only reason cakes will fall after out of the oven--I only start with this because it seems to be the most common explanation offered. Given the tester came out clean it is more likely that the cake simply lacked the requisite structure to support itself.

Was tweaking a yellow cake recipe to try and create a French Vanilla Cake. Everything looked good, tester was clean, rose to the top of the 2 inch high round, took it out. Looked over, 5 mins it was down 1/4 of inch, a few mins more was down 1/2 inch, by 10 mins had collapsed to 1 inch -- fell by 50%. I cut it open to look at it, it was completely cooked--it simply could not support itself.

The hot air that helps it to rise will keep it up in the oven but once it begins to cool, if it cannot support itself it will fall.



Was this from a mix or scratch?




Was a scratch recipe (uses cake flour). Made two changes to the original -- substituted heavy cream for the whole milk and changed from 2 eggs to 1 egg and 2 yolks (was only enough batter for one round). Made original recipe right after and the cake came out perfect. Pretty sure it was the change in the eggs, 2 yolks don't equal the same structure building as a single egg.

Coincidentally I also made a yellow cake that is very similar to the one I tried to alter but for eggs uses 1 whole egg/2 yolks but this recipe uses AP flour instead of cake flour. Given that AP flour has more gluten, hence more structure building, I am more convinced that the recipe I altered fell due the use of yolks instead of whole eggs.

LindaF144a Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 3:28pm
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorcake

Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorcake

Underbaking is not the only reason cakes will fall after out of the oven--I only start with this because it seems to be the most common explanation offered. Given the tester came out clean it is more likely that the cake simply lacked the requisite structure to support itself.

Was tweaking a yellow cake recipe to try and create a French Vanilla Cake. Everything looked good, tester was clean, rose to the top of the 2 inch high round, took it out. Looked over, 5 mins it was down 1/4 of inch, a few mins more was down 1/2 inch, by 10 mins had collapsed to 1 inch -- fell by 50%. I cut it open to look at it, it was completely cooked--it simply could not support itself.

The hot air that helps it to rise will keep it up in the oven but once it begins to cool, if it cannot support itself it will fall.



Was this from a mix or scratch?



Was a scratch recipe (uses cake flour). Made two changes to the original -- substituted heavy cream for the whole milk and changed from 2 eggs to 1 egg and 2 yolks (was only enough batter for one round). Made original recipe right after and the cake came out perfect. Pretty sure it was the change in the eggs, 2 yolks don't equal the same structure building as a single egg.

Coincidentally I also made a yellow cake that is very similar to the one I tried to alter but for eggs uses 1 whole egg/2 yolks but this recipe uses AP flour instead of cake flour. Given that AP flour has more gluten, hence more structure building, I am more convinced that the recipe I altered fell due the use of yolks instead of whole eggs.




Exactly! Science in action. I have had the same experience. Plus the added fat of the cream can have an effect too. Contrary to popular belief, more fat does not always equal more moisture.

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