Stacking A Fondant Layered Cake

Decorating By purplerosie77 Updated 5 Jul 2011 , 4:30pm by Queento2

purplerosie77 Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 4:41pm
post #1 of 19

ok i have my cakes baked fondant made and now i am not sure how to go about stacking the 3 tier paisley cakes do i make cardboard bottoms for them and then apply fondant and then layer on top of each with the cardboards under or are they layered with no cardboards thanks so much... icon_cry.gif

18 replies
rhofarabia Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 4:56pm
post #2 of 19

By layers do you mean tiers?

If so, then I would think you need a base under each tier. The weight of the fondant and the BC (or other) underneath it would need support.

carmijok Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 5:02pm
post #3 of 19

First, make sure you have dowels in place before you stack anything! Put each cake on it's own board (secured with buttercream and sized to fit the cake). Depending on how heavy the tiers are, and if you're using thin cardboard and not SPS, I would cover the boards with either Freezer wrap or press n seal to keep any moisture from seeping into the boards. Some people don't do this. I do. Cover each cake with your fondant and then stack. Finish decorating.

Mookie122 Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 5:03pm
post #4 of 19

I'm a little new to this, but this is what I've learned.

1. always but cardboard under your tiers and use dowels or straws that are cut evenly with the top of the each of the lower tiers.

2. use a blot of buttercream under each tier to secure the upper tier to the lower one.

3. I usually cut my cardboards smaller that my tiers so that appears to be nothing between the tiers.

I hope these tips help, I were given the same ones by some very well known bakers in my area. Good luck.

all4cake Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 5:05pm
post #5 of 19

You don't have to place a cardboard between each layer (unless your resulting tier will be taller than 5" when assembled). A cardboard/cake circle (at least one...some use more than one) under each multi layer tier should be sufficient.

sparkle25 Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 5:09pm
post #6 of 19
purplerosie77 Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 5:37pm
post #7 of 19

Thanks everyone for the replies. I tried watching videos on u tube but could not tell if there was cardboard under the layers. And for dowels since its going to be fondant I would dowel each layer then cover with fondant correct. And then stack. Thanks everyone.. I will post pics after I'm done today

all4cake Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 5:43pm
post #8 of 19

you dowel each tier...not each layer. and dowel each tier after they're covered in fondant.

CWR41 Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 5:46pm
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplerosie77

And for dowels since its going to be fondant I would dowel each layer then cover with fondant correct. And then stack.




No, you don't dowel each layer... you use a support system for every 4" of cake height (or every double-layer tier).

paulstonia Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 5:57pm
post #10 of 19

And the supports, dowel or straws, are not cut level with the top of the cake, they are cut to equal lengths. If you are new to this, is your cake isn't quite level on the top and the dowels are a 1/4 inch shorter on one side the cake is going to lean. I put one in to measure, pull it, cut it, and then all the rest are cut to the same length. Good luck and have fun icon_biggrin.gif

all4cake Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 6:06pm
post #11 of 19

This is a really good explanation from start to finish, http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/8089829/how_to_stack_and_cover_a_wedding_cake.html

just keep in mind when the author states "each cake", it actually is referring to an assembled tier (commonly, 2, 2" layers with filling between is one cake or tier)

mrsg1111 Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 6:26pm
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by paulstonia

And the supports, dowel or straws, are not cut level with the top of the cake, they are cut to equal lengths. If you are new to this, is your cake isn't quite level on the top and the dowels are a 1/4 inch shorter on one side the cake is going to lean. I put one in to measure, pull it, cut it, and then all the rest are cut to the same length. Good luck and have fun icon_biggrin.gif




I've been baking for a few years now, and never thought of this! Thank you so much for this tip!!!!!

Soccerboy37 Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 8:54pm
post #13 of 19

Hi, first time poster, long time stalker icon_biggrin.gif. Trying to tie into this discusion about stacking. I was hoping to make a cake in the shape of a firework for the 4th this weekend. I was thinking 36" high using 6" round cakes, which would come to 6 cakes. I will use one large piece of fondant to cover the entire cake when I am done, just like a firecracker wrapper. Is my bottom cake going to be able to support the weight of my top? I realize I will have to use straws for support, but I'm worried now. Thanks for any help you can offer.

all4cake Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 9:05pm
post #14 of 19

6, 6"x6" round cakes stacked directly on top of each other...then, covered in fondant...I'd consider something more durable/strong than straws for your support. Possibly straws along with a center rod and plate system. Definitely allow each tier settle time before doweling as well as after assembling before applying fondant. Chilling your stacked tiers and applying a fondant wrap may prove to be less troublesome than trying to cover the tower like piece.

Narie Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 9:38pm
post #15 of 19

{36" high with 6 " round cakes would be 6 cakes.} ??????? What? If you make two layer tiers they will be about 4" high each. OK, 4 into 36 is 9 - so you would need 9 double layer cakes. That is a huge cake, and it would require an incredibly strong internal structure. Also your fondant sheet would have to be at least 78" in diameter. I hope I misunderstood your plan.

Soccerboy37 Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 10:13pm
post #16 of 19

Sorry, it wont be 36" high, lol. I was planning on making 6 cakes total and just looking at the Wilton page they are 2" deep pans, so that would make 12", not 36 lol icon_smile.gif I'm at work so I cant say for sure. Does this change things.. I know height wise that is a big difference.

Narie Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 10:33pm
post #17 of 19

OK- that is the same as a three tiered cake. You will need to treat the cake like 3 two layer cakes with a support system for each double layer. The only difference is the tiers are all same circumference. You will still be working with a large piece of fondant - 30 inches in diameter. Plan out ahead of time how you are going to move it from the table to the cake.
Good Luck - I hope it turns out very well.

Soccerboy37 Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 9:22pm
post #18 of 19

Thanks for the advice. I will let you guys know how it goes, if it goes well I may post pics. But we will see lol.

Queento2 Posted 5 Jul 2011 , 4:30pm
post #19 of 19

I'm interested to know if it worked out for her.

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