Problem With Red Colored Gumpaste

Decorating By inspiredbymom Updated 30 Jun 2011 , 8:00pm by carmijok

inspiredbymom Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 4:12pm
post #1 of 7

I recently needed to make red blossoms for a wedding cake. I used gumpaste because I didn't want them to "wilt". I colored it two days in advance to set the color. I spent several hours preparing the 72 blossoms. After a couple of hours, the blossoms faded. They turned from red to a brick or clay color. They looked awful! However, the gumpaste that was not used still looked red! Since I only had one more day before I had to work on the cake, I stayed up all night making flowers out of fondant with tylose and prayed for the best. I used the same coloring (americolor red red). I stayed away from wilton coloring just because I didn't want the color to fade. (I have read many topics about the dye problems in red) So, can anyone shed any light on what happened? I used Wilton premade gumpaste with americolor. The new flowers never faded even though I didn't have time to let the color "set". I'll have a pic up soon. I forgot to take a pic of the yucky flowers. I was so upset that I dumped them all because I needed my trays for the new flowers. Any thoughts???

6 replies
carmijok Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 4:25pm
post #2 of 7

Ack! You shouldn't have dumped them! Gum paste will dry a lot lighter, but what you can do is paint over them with red food color and extract or vodka to get the deeper color you want. I had to do that to match the brim of the purple baseball hat to the cake I made and also to deepen a navy background for my Dallas Mavericks cake logo (in my photos). I would also think petal dusts might work too...but I love the color I can get with the gel and lemon extract (or vodka).

inspiredbymom Posted 30 Jun 2011 , 6:00pm
post #3 of 7

I like your hat! Okay, my DH tried painting the flowers but it looked streaky. How did you keep it from streaking? I tried petal dust and it was real light. UGH! I must be doing it wrong. Practice will make it happen I guess! Thanks for the advice! I'll keep working at it!

TexasSugar Posted 30 Jun 2011 , 6:03pm
post #4 of 7

I agree with carmijok, gumpaste does tend to dry lighter in color.

SarahBeth3 Posted 30 Jun 2011 , 6:07pm
post #5 of 7

Sorry this happened. I had the same problem too the first time I used gum paste. Thankfully it was a surprise cake for my mom for mother's day, so the color didn't have to be perfect and I was able to tint my icing to match later. I just assumed it would dry darker like fondant. Now I always go darker than what I want (just like I go a little lighter with fondant) and it comes out great!

joycesdaughter111 Posted 30 Jun 2011 , 6:10pm
post #6 of 7

Did you have your flowers near a window?

Direct sunlight can fade gumpaste flowers.

I had this happen with purple fondant/gumtex flower left by a sunny window...they faded to a pinkish color.

carmijok Posted 30 Jun 2011 , 8:00pm
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by inspiredbymom

I like your hat! Okay, my DH tried painting the flowers but it looked streaky. How did you keep it from streaking? I tried petal dust and it was real light. UGH! I must be doing it wrong. Practice will make it happen I guess! Thanks for the advice! I'll keep working at it!




Are you using gel color or the petal dust...because petal dust won't work on this process. Just put a bit of gel color on a plate or a pallet and then mix a little vodka or extract to make it more spreadable and paint it on. It's like working with water colors. You can thin it or keep the gel more thick. And just keep painting it until it's more uniform in color and let dry. You can also use the 'streaks' to your advantage too...the darker color can highlight the veining or crevices in your petals. On my cap, the color settled into the 'stitching' and made it stand out more I think.

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