Fresh Vs Frozen

Decorating By KrystalBella Updated 28 Jun 2011 , 10:52am by KrystalBella

KrystalBella Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 10:00am
post #1 of 9

Hello cake friends

I have a questions regarding freezing cakes. When you freeze a cake and then are ready to decorate it do you thaw it out first before you start decorating? Doesnt freezing dry out the cake? Also how long can you freeze cake for before it becomes un useable?\\

Thanks guys

8 replies
1Cake-At-ATime Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 11:35am
post #2 of 9

Yes, let my cakes sit out for about 10-15 minutes before decorating them.

Freezing doesn't dry out cake, in fact, it actually seals in the moisture provided you wrap and freeze just after the cake comes out the oven.

I have frozen a cake for 2 weeks and had zero issues with taste.

When you freeze cakes, just make sure you tightly wrap them well. I double wrap with saran wrap and double wrap with foil.

1Cake-At-ATime Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 11:36am
post #3 of 9

Yes, I let my cakes sit out for about 10-15 minutes before decorating them.

Freezing doesn't dry out cake, in fact, it actually seals in the moisture provided you wrap and freeze just after the cake comes out the oven.

I have frozen a cake for 2 weeks and had zero issues with taste.

When you freeze cakes, just make sure you tightly wrap them well. I double wrap with saran wrap and double wrap with foil.

PrivateNameHere Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 11:59am
post #4 of 9

I always let my cakes freeze before using them. But I always make very sure they are thawed before I decorate. I made that mistake once! My buttercream never set up and it got condensation all over it icon_sad.gif

blissfulbaker Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 12:39pm
post #5 of 9

I freeze cakes quite often. I leave them in the pan and cover the pan with plastic wrap. They always come out very moist. I do let it defrost but I decorate it while it is cold still.

kakeladi Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 1:12pm
post #6 of 9

Leaving cakes in the pan and fzing them will lead to having excess crumbs &/or trouble getting thme out of the pan icon_sad.gif

Take cake out of oven; set on rack to cool about 10 minutes; level even w/top of pan (if necessary); turn out onto plastic wrap; wrap well but not firmly - you don't want to distort the cake. Place into plastic bag and freeze.
When needing to work on a cake take it out of fzr & put into frig overnight. This is the best way to defrost them. If necessary or you forget to defrost in frig you can bring to room temp still wrapped in plastic wrap.
Icing a completely fzn cake can lead to the icing falling off the cake in whole/big sheets along w/the condensation problems mentioned in another reply.
One cannot rely on a certain amount of time to defrost as the size and flavor of the cake will make a difference. A 6 or 8" will defrost much quicker than a 12, or 16"er.

I have had occasion to have to defrost a cake very quickly - right out of the fzr to be decorated and ready for p/u in just a few hours so, being it was winter, I put it in front of the heating registericon_smile.gif A 10" single layer took about 15-30 minutes that way icon_smile.gif

1Cake-At-ATime Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 2:43pm
post #7 of 9

Whether the cake is in the pan or out, cakes can be frozen and thawed before decorating without any ill effects.

Everyone has their methods that work for THEM and if it's freezing a cake while in the pan, than kudos to them for having a system that works. If it didn't work, then I would imagine they would not recommend it.

I prefer to remove the cake from the pan before freezing, but I will and cannot say leaving a cake in the pan is a definitive no-no, because we all know that we don't work in the kitchen together.

OP I hope the later responses answered your question. icon_smile.gif

mena2002 Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 6:26pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Cake-At-ATime

Whether the cake is in the pan or out, cakes can be frozen and thawed before decorating without any ill effects.

Everyone has their methods that work for THEM and if it's freezing a cake while in the pan, than kudos to them for having a system that works. If it didn't work, then I would imagine they would not recommend it.




I agree everybody has their own way of doing things and it's usually what works best for them. thumbs_up.gif

KrystalBella Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 10:52am
post #9 of 9

Thank you so much to all. I was a little worried about freezing cakes but now i know that it doesnt destroy a cake im going to try it.

Again CC has been very helpful to me. I LOVE THIS SITE

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