Round Cake Vs Square

Baking By KrystalBella Updated 27 Jun 2011 , 2:46pm by 1Cake-At-ATime

KrystalBella Posted 26 Jun 2011 , 9:12am
post #1 of 11

Ok so im having a major issue with a cake im making. Everytime i cook the cake in a square tin it come out perfect. Everytime i cook it in a round tin it comes out darker and dry. This is when im cooking a pound cake. Should your oven be on a lower temp with round cakes? I know its not the time cause i kept checking it and it cant be the recipe cause the square comes out perfect. It took longer to cook the 6" round then it did to cook the 7 " square. I dont knwo what im doing wrong. Please help.

10 replies
1Cake-At-ATime Posted 26 Jun 2011 , 10:42am
post #2 of 11

I don't think oven temps will vary with shape of cake, but I'm only stating from my experience.

All my cakes are baked at 325' and maybe the times will vary according to size, but not according to shape. And I have noticed that my 6" rounds bake a little longer than an 8, but I contribute that to the depth of the pan due to the smaller size.

If you cakes are coming out dark, I recommend lowering your baking temp.

For the dryness, if you are using an all scratch recipe, then it could be that you are over baking them and/or the temp is again, too high. For my scratch cakes, I always add 1/4 cup of instant jello pudding (flavor matching) to my cake mix.

If you are using a box mix, then it could be that again, baking too long and at a high temp.

Also, try adding a heating core after you pour in the mix into the cake pan. As I understand it, heating cores help distribute the heat, ensures the center is cooked, and also prevents a doming cake. I have a traditional heating core, but I love using icing nails or icing tips as a heating core. I just place one right in the center of the cake pan after I have poured in the mix.

kakeladi Posted 26 Jun 2011 , 12:22pm
post #3 of 11

............try adding a heating core after you pour in the mix into the cake pan. As I understand it, heating cores help distribute the heat, ensures the center is cooked,..............

*Totally UNnecessary for such a small cake*. Even cakes as big as 14 & 16" don't really need one. I have baked 1,000s w/o any icon_smile.gif
I have a feeling it might be something to do with the heat distribution in the oven. It might not be baking evenly or the temp is off. Use an oven thermometer inside the oven and don't rely on the dial setting.

gatorcake Posted 26 Jun 2011 , 12:54pm
post #4 of 11

So need a little more information to potential diagnose the problem. I assume it is a 6 in round versus a 7 x 7 square. The question is how deep are the pans? Are they both 2 inches deep?

The related question is do you fill the pans to the same level?

The difference in cooking would be related to the volume of the pans, more specially the depth of the batter in each pan. Fill a 6 in round to half, take that same batter and then put it in a 7 inch square, the depths of the batter will differ. The batter in the 6 in round will be higher than if the same amount of batter is placed in a 7 inch square. Place both in the oven and the round will take longer to cook.


Thus although a 6 inch round is "smaller" than a 7 in square, if the depth of the batter is higher in the 6 in. round it, will take longer to bake than if the same amount of batter is placed in a 7 inch square.

If you are filling the pans to the same level this all of course is irrelevant but is the only thing I can think of at this point to explain the difference in cooking time.

1Cake-At-ATime Posted 26 Jun 2011 , 1:06pm
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

............try adding a heating core after you pour in the mix into the cake pan. As I understand it, heating cores help distribute the heat, ensures the center is cooked,..............

*Totally UNnecessary for such a small cake*. Even cakes as big as 14 & 16" don't really need one. I have baked 1,000s w/o any icon_smile.gif
I have a feeling it might be something to do with the heat distribution in the oven. It might not be baking evenly or the temp is off. Use an oven thermometer inside the oven and don't rely on the dial setting.




I think using a heating core is a bakers preference, like everything else. In my case, I must use them due to the type of oven I have in Europe and my cakes will only bake properly when I use them.

I recommended this to the OP as an option.

Thanks for your reply.

nanefy Posted 26 Jun 2011 , 4:25pm
post #6 of 11

It could be your pan - the silver tins are the best for baking, dark pans absorb and hold more heat, so if your square tin is silver and your round tin is dark, then that could be causing the problem. Assuming this is the issue, you can soak towel strips in water and then wrap them round your round tin in order to distribute the heat more evenly. Also try lowering the temperature.

charliecakes Posted 26 Jun 2011 , 5:08pm
post #7 of 11

Yes as nanefy said. Could be your pans. Are all of these pans by the same manufacturer. I have some really nice quality pans that bake up nice and fine and then I have other less expensive pans that do seem to make my cakes darken or have crispy edges.

kakeladi Posted 26 Jun 2011 , 5:55pm
post #8 of 11

.........Fill a 6 in round to half, take that same batter and then put it in a 7 inch square, the depths of the batter will differ. ...........

So very true! I just assumed (there is that aweful word again) that each pan was filled to the same depth and since I only use 2" deep pans that's what the OP was using icon_smile.gif Makes a world of difference for sure if they are 3" deep or not filled to at least 1/2 full no matter them size.

KrystalBella Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 9:35am
post #9 of 11

Hi all

Thank you so much for the replies. I had no idea that the colour of your tin makes a difference. Thats a good thing to know later on. The only tins i use are the DaddyO silver ones and they were the same thinkness. I filled the batter to the same as i did the square. The recipe i used actually says for what size tin and if it is round or square. Its just that the rounds dont bake the same. They did take alot longer then square too. I might try a lower temp next time.

Also for some reason my rounds bake flat and the square tins bake with a dome. I might try the flower nail thing. Im up for trying anything at this point.

THank you all again. This is the most helpful site ever and everyone is willing to help which is the best.

xxoo

PrivateNameHere Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 1:07pm
post #10 of 11

This post has lots of helpful info in it for me! Thank you everyone!

1Cake-At-ATime Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 2:46pm
post #11 of 11

Awesome! I'm glad we were all able to help each other. icon_smile.gif

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