Would Like Your Opinion On Methods Of Pricing 3D Cakes

Business By Dreme Updated 30 Jun 2011 , 9:45pm by Crustymuffin

Dreme Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 3:36pm
post #1 of 6

I know there are a million threads asking what should be charged. I know what I would like to charge I'm just curious on the method that others use for pricing 3d cakes.

I don't really do many 3d cakes but recently it seems that is all people want. This is all new to me. I had been pricing the cakes by my fondant serving price and then adding on pricing for details (for example the cost of a sugar crown, or a fondant figure). Lately I have been thinking about just going up by a dollar on my fondant price and making that the flat rate for 3d cakes instead of doing all the add ons (unless its like a million handmade sugar flowers or something). Im not sure


So how do you price your 3d/carved/sculpted cakes?

-Base price and then add on

or

-A higher flat rate fee with no add ons.

5 replies
Annabakescakes Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 4:02pm
post #2 of 6

A little of both...I charge a higher rate per serving, then add on if it is really technical. I get the serving amount by seeing the serving amount of the cakes i will use to carve, then subtracting a percentage. That is why I start with a higher serving amount. Some people charge regular serving amounts and charge for the cut off cake too. I think the most important thing is finding a method that you are happy with and sticking to it. It gets easier with practice.

Dreme Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 4:50pm
post #3 of 6

I was asking in another thread about how to figure out how many servings the carved cake will feed. I wanted to know if there was a percentage to go by on carved cakes for the servings.

Are you subtracting a percentage off the price, a percentage to get the servings, or both? Do you mind me asking how do you find that percentage? Some cakes i'm lost on how to figure out the number of servings.

Annabakescakes Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 5:10pm
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreme

I was asking in another thread about how to figure out how many servings the carved cake will feed. I wanted to know if there was a percentage to go by on carved cakes for the servings.

Are you subtracting a percentage off the price, a percentage to get the servings, or both? Do you mind me asking how do you find that percentage? Some cakes i'm lost on how to figure out the number of servings.




I subtract a percentage off the servings, but multiply it by the higher price.

I visualize the cake, and the cake I will use to carve it from, and how many servings the original cake serves. I figure how many much cake I will have to carve off and estimate what percent it is. I like to use shaped pans as much as I can, to carve off as little as I can, so sometimes i figure I cut off about 5% sometimes it is as much as 20%. That is how I get the servings.

It is all an estimate, I always try to err on the side of a few less servings than I think it will serve. So it will serve at least as much as I say, but I would rather charge a little less than say it will feed a certain amount and have them turn up short.

costumeczar Posted 25 Jun 2011 , 1:24am
post #5 of 6

I find that the number of servings is the least of my worries with 3-D cakes. I don't even worry about that in terms of figuring out how much to charge. The cost is in the time that it takes.

I can do a wedding cake in a few hours, then work on the groom's cake that goes with it for 5 hours. The number of the servings in the wedding cake would probably be about 4 times the number of servings in the groom's cake, but you have to charge appropriately for your time.

For argument's sake, say that you're charging $4 a servings for the wedding cake, and it would serve 120. So that's $480 gross profit on 3 hours of hands-on work. If your overhead is about 30% (I'm just pulling mumbers out of the air for argument's sake here) then you've netted about $336 out of that.

If you charged the same $4 a serving for the groom's cake that served 30, you'd be grossing $120 for 5 hours of hands-on work. Using the same expense percentage you've now netted $84 for more time spent.


And I'm also leaving out the time spent on prep work for the two cakes, which for a 3-D cake could potentially be more than the wedding cake.

Crustymuffin Posted 30 Jun 2011 , 9:45pm
post #6 of 6

3D cakes are pretty much all I do. Here is how I price it.
Price per serving (what you think you will deliver)
1/2 base price per serving (for carve away)
Hourly rate for Structure
Hourly rate for Sculpting
Hourly rate for Painting
Hourly rate for FX (setting up Smoke, lights, and motors)

It is actually broken down on the invoice this way. This helps me track what I am making my money on. thumbs_up.gif

I up charge all supplies 25% and I count everything.
Boards, motors, lights, Structure parts, everything!

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