Where Can I Find These And What Exactly Are They Called?

Decorating By mommie917 Updated 24 Jun 2011 , 11:25am by jason_kraft

mommie917 Posted 23 Jun 2011 , 8:19pm
post #1 of 11

Hi, I'm looking for some aluminum cake circles. I think they're about 4 inches tall. They look like giant circle cutters (they have no top or bottom) I've seen them on cake shows and they're use to layer and fill cakes evenly. Does anyone know what I'm talking about? Lol. Thanks!

10 replies
leah_s Posted 23 Jun 2011 , 8:26pm
post #2 of 11

cake rings I think. I haven't used those since culinary school.

joycesdaughter111 Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 2:18am
post #3 of 11

Ive always wondered why one would use a cake ring instead of a cake pan? Anyone?

Tug Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 2:48am
post #4 of 11

I've seen some at Sur La Table but they are pricey. I think a small 4 inch ring was about $9-$10. I didn't look at bigger rings because the price tag turned me off.

warchild Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 2:52am
post #5 of 11

Here's a couple links you can find cake rings.

http://www.cheftools.com/Fat-Daddio's-Cake-Rings-Molds/departments/1068/

http://cooksdream.com/store/bk.html

Amazon has cake rings also. Fat Daddio line in stainless steel.

Be sure you check for price difference between the 3 before you decide.

jason_kraft Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 3:18am
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by joycesdaughter111

Ive always wondered why one would use a cake ring instead of a cake pan? Anyone?



It saves on labor (which is usually the most expensive part of the cake) if you have a high volume operation. Make a ton of batter, pour it into half sheet or full sheet pans, and use the cake rings to cut out the sizes you need.

yummy_in_my_tummy Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 3:18am
post #7 of 11

I don't use cake rings, but I think people use them so they can cut perfectly sized circles from sheets of cake and then fill & stack them. That way the sides are all even because each layer is the exact same size. When you bake in a regular pan, sometimes one cake may pull away from the sides of the pan more than others. That's what I think anyway icon_smile.gif

sweetpea223 Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 3:44am
post #8 of 11

I've used those cake rings, not to cut cake but to mold cake mousse. The cake was a bit smaller than the cake ring, then layered with mousse and cake.

auzzi Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 7:16am
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Quote:

It saves on labor (which is usually the most expensive part of the cake) if you have a high volume operation. Make a ton of batter, pour it into half sheet or full sheet pans, and use the cake rings to cut out the sizes you need.




How do you factor in the cost of the cake off-cuts and how do you apportion the those costs to the cakes that you have cut using the rings?

Cakechick123 Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 7:28am
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi



How do you factor in the cost of the cake off-cuts and how do you apportion the those costs to the cakes that you have cut using the rings?




I also wonder, it seems like a huge waste to me

jason_kraft Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 11:25am
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi

Quote:
Quote:

It saves on labor (which is usually the most expensive part of the cake) if you have a high volume operation. Make a ton of batter, pour it into half sheet or full sheet pans, and use the cake rings to cut out the sizes you need.



How do you factor in the cost of the cake off-cuts and how do you apportion the those costs to the cakes that you have cut using the rings?



When baking in high volume you can afford to buy ingredients in bulk, so the cost of wasted batter is pretty low. The increased productivity resulting from a standardized process of baking only sheet cakes should outweigh the ingredient cost, especially if pan handling time is a constraint. For example, you can cut a 6", 8", and 10" round out of an 18x24" full sheet cake, so you only have one pan to handle instead of 3. Plus if you look at the start of the process you don't have to worry about which size pans to use, and you don't need to keep a large stock of pans in different sizes.

The scraps can also be repurposed into other products, like cake balls. Anything you can't repurpose would be considered overhead cost.

Of course, in a low volume situation where labor productivity is not a constraint (i.e. the ability to make 5% more cakes in a day would not lead to increased profit) then the advantage to this approach would be greatly diminished.

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