imagenthatnj Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 6:45pm

Oh, that's why. That's not egg whites. And if you ever want to use powdered egg whites, that's not the same as meringue powder.

Edited to say that I didn't mean to say that egg beaters are not egg whites. They are, but I think they have more stuff added to them. I just know not to use them for meringues, and that's all I care to know.

1Cake-At-ATime Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 6:46pm

Oh wait, no I just checked...they are AllWhites Egg Whites. But it does say not good for meringue.

imagenthatnj Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 6:55pm

Hey! Those are the ones I use all the time! That's crazy. I've never read the not good for meringue line. And I've been using them for 4 years already.

And this is what's on their website (see the word "frostings" there?)

AllWhites® 100% Liquid Egg Whites are delicious scrambled, as a white omelet or as a tasty protein fruit drink! They are also great for French toast, quiche, meatloaf, cakes, frostings, cookies and batters and coatings for baking!

I'm going back home tonight to check for that line.

But they do work. Trust me. Maybe you have to whip longer before you add the butter.

1Cake-At-ATime Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 7:03pm

Weird. On the side my carton, the green and white box with blue "All Whites" lettering says:

"AllWhites 100% Liquid Egg Whites are heated during the pasteurization process and therefore not recommended for meringues or angel food cake"

Its the AllWhites carton with the veggie omelet on the front.

This is the reason why I cannot wait to return to the States because being overseas for six years has me out of touch with certain food products. I didn't even know this stuff existed until our commissary started carrying them about two months ago. icon_sad.gif

imagenthatnj Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 7:22pm

I'm almost sure those are the ones I have at home and that I've been using, without reading any of this. And they have worked. Not sure if because I make IMBC, so I don't have to heat them up, just whip them. I'll check when I get home after work.

Read here what Eme says about them.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&;file=viewtopic&t=631817&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=15

FromScratchSF Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 7:39pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj

I'm almost sure those are the ones I have at home and that I've been using, without reading any of this. And they have worked. Not sure if because I make IMBC, so I don't have to heat them up, just whip them. I'll check when I get home after work.

Read here what Eme says about them.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&;file=viewtopic&t=631817&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=15




Huh, gotta disagree with her, you need stiff peaks for a fluffy SMBC. Otherwise it's the consistency of butter. And crazy that you get the carton egg whites to work! I only tried once and they failed. It's less expensive for me to just buy real eggs and as I've posted before, I use the yolks in my cakes or make them into custards/curds. I have minimal to no waist.

Jen

imagenthatnj Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 7:45pm

Yes, I disagree with her on the soft peaks. But I get stiff peaks. Not sure if because I take them from the fridge to the mixer (as I said, IMBC) and don't heat them up at all, until they're stiff peaks and the 248˚F sugar syrup hits them.

I wish I could use the real eggs, but there are too many people afraid of them, and asking me what I used...sigh...

So maybe they work for me to stiff peaks because I'm making IMBC. I can't remember the names of the people who work with that same brand of egg whites, but there are a few here in CC.

tigachu Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 9:56pm

I started using the egg whites from the carton in my SMBC about a year ago. I have been making SMBC with regular egg whites for years prior but decided to try the carton after reading a posting about it on here. I didn't notice a difference at all. I used the store brand 100% egg whites and I am pretty sure the carton said it wasn't suitable for meringues. Its odd but I still got stiff peaks out of it even though the carton said it wouldn't work icon_confused.gif I will say that it takes a bit longer for me to get the carton egg whites to a stiff peak in comparison to the regular egg whites.

I switch back and forth with using regular egg whites and the carton-it really just depends on my mood and if I have future plans for the extra yolks.

1Cake-At-ATime Posted 25 Jun 2011 , 11:04am

What are you ladies using to whip the eggs? Hand mixer or stand mixer? And on what setting?

LindaF144a Posted 25 Jun 2011 , 1:47pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Cake-At-ATime

What are you ladies using to whip the eggs? Hand mixer or stand mixer? And on what setting?


KA stand mixer on 8

tigachu Posted 25 Jun 2011 , 1:50pm

I use my breville stand mixer, starting low until the egg whites get frothy and gradually increase the speed to the "whip" setting. The fresh egg whites whip up faster for me but the carton ones work for me, too.

imagenthatnj Posted 25 Jun 2011 , 2:13pm

Egg whites (from carton) with cream of tartar added, starting low like tigachu until they get frothy, then going to medium and when it's at soft peaks I add the sugar. Then I beat on high until they are stiff. (I'm making IMBC, not Swiss)

Then the hot syrup.

I was actually once very obsessed with meringues, and I bought a few of the CIA DVDs, including this meringue DVD (there's a little preview there).

http://www.ciaprochef.com/fbi/dvds/Meringue.html

The chefs on that DVD don't put the hot syrup in when you are at high peaks, but when you're at low peaks, which never worked for me...go figure. I really gotta check it out again. lol.

LindaF144a Posted 25 Jun 2011 , 4:43pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj

Egg whites (from carton) with cream of tartar added, starting low like tigachu until they get frothy, then going to medium and when it's at soft peaks I add the sugar. Then I beat on high until they are stiff. (I'm making IMBC, not Swiss)

Then the hot syrup.

I was actually once very obsessed with meringues, and I bought a few of the CIA DVDs, including this meringue DVD (there's a little preview there).

http://www.ciaprochef.com/fbi/dvds/Meringue.html

The chefs on that DVD don't put the hot syrup in when you are at high peaks, but when you're at low peaks, which never worked for me...go figure. I really gotta check it out again. lol.




I haven't looked at the video, but what hot syrup are you talking about for SMBC?

imagenthatnj Posted 25 Jun 2011 , 4:46pm

Linda, I'm saying right there that I'm making IMBC, not Swiss. I decided once not to bother with Swiss. I like the IMBC process better.

LindaF144a Posted 25 Jun 2011 , 7:54pm

Sorry, missed that in your post. Trying to read this and make a cake at the same time. icon_biggrin.gif

But that could be the reason why the carton egg whites work for you. It could be something with not adding the sugar or cooking it further like you do with SMBC.

imagenthatnj Posted 25 Jun 2011 , 8:05pm

Yes, I thought so. I even said so before. But then tigachu came back telling she makes SMBC with those same egg whites...lol

I just checked the cartons and I have those exact egg whites. I never read that they were not suitable for meringue, but they do say that. If I had read that long ago I would have never tried.

Nice logo on your new website by the way. I wish you much success with your new bakery.

airedalian Posted 1 Jul 2011 , 9:08pm

I don't know if it's going to recover my SMBC, but this glass of wine I'm having is certainly helping my temperament.

The house is too warm I'm convinced. When your butter sits on the counter for an hour and is beyond dent-with-your-fingers soft, it ought to be a hint... Followed FromScratchSF's recipe to a T, got beautiful stiff peaks, put in my butter and ... soup. Never even bothered to curdle. After 20 minutes I turned up the mixer to 3, just outta curiosity, and it spit egg white-flavored butter on me. Charming. Tried the bags of veggies all around with no appreciable difference. I just stuck the whole mess in the fridge, took out the wine, and figure it can't get any worse.

crazyladybaker Posted 1 Jul 2011 , 9:18pm

sorry the frosting didn't work icon_sad.gif Enjoy your wine though.
I have used the cartons of whites without problems.
Hugs and have a good evening.

imagenthatnj Posted 1 Jul 2011 , 9:28pm

What did you use, airedalian? Real egg whites? I hope you can still bring it back. Sometimes it does after being in the fridge.

Yes, I just helped a friend two nights ago make coconut IMBC (not Swiss) with cartons of whites, for the first time, and she knows it works now.

Do let us know if it works out.

airedalian Posted 1 Jul 2011 , 9:38pm

Thanks, y'all!

I'm pretty sure it's a karmic smackdown for trying to make an elaborate tiered cake far above my skill level just to one up an annoying family member. Little does karma realize I'm just petty enough to say "it's only butter/eggs and to heck with this month's grocery budget". If it doesn't come back together I'll start over. Now that I've ratcheted the AC down to about 65...

Yep, used real egg whites. Got a gorgeous meringue out of it. Clearly, the butter has it out for me.

I threw it back on the KA. At this point I don't know that I even know what it's supposed to look like, but the texture isn't soup anymore now that it's cooled off. When it was warmer it was definitely buttery; now I notice the egg more. Of course, I haven't added anything resembling a flavor to it yet.

The nice thing? Teenagers. I could pour it in a soup-like state over just about anything and they'll gulp it down and think it's heaven.

imagenthatnj Posted 1 Jul 2011 , 9:58pm

Pictures for you...to see if it looked at some stages, like this...

http://sweetapolita.com/2011/04/swiss-meringue-buttercream-demystified/

And more reading to do?

airedalian Posted 1 Jul 2011 , 10:23pm

Hey thanks!

The picture right below "This is a few cubes in, so you can see that the meringue has started to deflate, but once we add all of that butter, it will fluff up" is how it looked from Minute 1 through Minute 20. Smooth, pretty, just ... thin.

It did thicken up in the fridge and, after another 15 minutes on the KA , one presumes it would have stayed that way ... until I ticked it off by pouring melted white chocolate in it. A little at a time, and as cooled as I felt I could go before "melted" no longer applied. It's back in the fridge. I feel kinda like when I'm trying to punish the kids by sending them to their rooms but that's where all the fun stuff is, so they're happy as clams to be there...

Taste is good; daughter raved over the texture, but is concerned about the "whipped cream-like-ness" of it. Fortunately, I may choose something above my skill level but I'm not a complete idiot ... the tier this is on represents water, so I'm not even going for a smoothed out look. Choppy waves all the way. Provided it doesn't flat-out slide off the cake, I think I'm good.

FromScratchSF Posted 1 Jul 2011 , 10:23pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by airedalian

I don't know if it's going to recover my SMBC, but this glass of wine I'm having is certainly helping my temperament.

The house is too warm I'm convinced. When your butter sits on the counter for an hour and is beyond dent-with-your-fingers soft, it ought to be a hint... Followed FromScratchSF's recipe to a T, got beautiful stiff peaks, put in my butter and ... soup. Never even bothered to curdle. After 20 minutes I turned up the mixer to 3, just outta curiosity, and it spit egg white-flavored butter on me. Charming. Tried the bags of veggies all around with no appreciable difference. I just stuck the whole mess in the fridge, took out the wine, and figure it can't get any worse.




Oh no!!!! How warm do you think your kitchen is? Yes, your butter can be too warm, butter starts to melt at 80 or so degrees, so if its warm, then yes. Pop it in the fridge to chill it back up a bit, but make sure you take it out and stir it every 5 mins or so. It will start to chill from the outsides in so make sure you stir often to keep the temp even. If it starts to solidify, DO NOT WHIP IT, it will break.

And have a glass of wine for me!

airedalian Posted 1 Jul 2011 , 11:02pm

Hey, Jen! I'm not sure what it is in here, but when it's 99 outside, walking in to 78-80 seems delightful enough. Normally I'm a 72 kinda gal, but with an outrageous power bill last month I'm trying to adapt. Apparently I'm a bit too used to it for this particular application!

I've had enough glasses for plenty of people, but in the end I'm pretty sure it's all worked out fine, thanks to all the advice on this thread and in the comments section of your blog. The important thing is that when said relative comments on how wonderful it is, the entire family is ordered to smile and has been placed under a gag order whereby the words "profanitiy", "wine", and "stomping around like two-year-old" are banned.

LindaF144a Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 2:48pm

If your kitchen is warm, do not leave the butter out to get to room temp, especially if it was that soft after just an hour. Making SMBC is a different process in the hot summer than it is in the winter, especially in humid areas like we have here on the east coast. (I have lived on both coasts and our humidity on this side of the country is completely different than on the west coast, as in we suffocate in it icon_biggrin.gif .)

I have used FromScratch's process here on a humid day and the frosting never set up. Out of frustration I left it on the counter and went to bed. Something happened over night because I woke to perfect frosting. You could do that, but if you want a quicker process for a humid area you will get a delicious SMBC using other methods also. Jen lives in SF where they must get a humid day once in every 10 years. I love it there, don't get me wrong. It is one of the things I miss about the west coast. But because we are all getting different reactions to a perfected recipe, I have come to believe that when one lives in a humid area, we have to do it differently.

In the summer, you can use the butter from the fridge after about 20 minutes out, especially if you do not have AC. If it is 90 degrees and you do not have AC, use the butter straight from the fridge, just add it in about 1 tablespoon at a time and wait about 10-15 seconds before adding the next piece. I know this is not what FromScratchSF recommends, but I do this all the time and it works. I will also be doing it in my shop. I also put the mixer on 4 when I do this. Putting on a higher speed than 1 will not ruin your SMBC. You will need to do this with a colder butter in order to insure that it gets incorporated.

As you add the cold butter it will cool your meringue. You will feel the bowl starting to cool. If your house is warm it will be impossible to cool that meringue to add the butter without getting soup. But if you add the cold butter, eventually the temp of the butter will take over the temp of the meringue and it will cool down. Think of it like adding ice cubes to a drink. Yes, some of the ice melts, but not completely before the drink cools down.

If you add the butter this way you will not get soup and you will not have to put the bowl in the fridge to cool everything down all the time. Your meringue will take on different looks at different stages. The end stage before it turns to delicious SMBC is it will either look like it is going to curdle or turn ugly, but that is the magic part before it all comes together. Once it gets past that stage it turns into light fluffy goodness. You should be glad to see that stage because it means you have reached SMBC nirvana.

As for the white chocolate, how hot was it when you added it to your SMBC? There is a fine line between too hot and cold. It should sit out after it is melted for a good 30 minutes. Having a hot kitchen means it would not harden back up. My experience has been that it takes a long time for the chocolate to harden, so don't worry about not getting into the icing right away. You can check it every so often for this too as it does not harden up completely but over a slow process. Also when you add it is key too. Was it still soupy and the magic did not happen yet? And if the SMBC is too cold (say from putting in and out of the fridge), your white chocolate will immediately harden up and you will get little teeny chunks of solid white chocolate.

All this advice is probably too late for this batch, but you can keep it in the back of your mind for the next batch.

FromScratchSF Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 3:40pm

Linda, just to correct you, San Francisco is a 7x7 mile square that is surrounded on 3 sides by water and is covered in fog about 85% of the year on the bay side of the city, and 95% of the year on the ocean side of the city. If you go to Weather.com right now it shows humidity is 100% with no rain. Living in San Francisco is like living on a completely different continent from the rest of California in terms of weather. I don't know why people don't think of SF as humid, because believe me, it is year round.

I just made a triple batch of my recipe with butter at 73 degrees and it came out perfect in 100% humidity and the thermometer says it's 72 degrees in the kitchen. It's why I was up before the sun to get my stuff done because once everyone starts really cooking the kitchen can get up to at least 90 degrees (because nobody has air conditioning here), which is not only bad for any buttercream made with no shortening, the walk-in is way too small for everyone to sit in to cool off icon_biggrin.gif.

Jen

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