Substition For Self Rising Flour

Baking By ginnyroyal Updated 24 Jun 2011 , 4:56am by josefina20

ginnyroyal Posted 23 Jun 2011 , 7:22am
post #1 of 9

Hi,
Can anyone tell me how much baking soda and baking powder I need to add to reg. flour to make it self-rising flour?

8 replies
tania9 Posted 23 Jun 2011 , 8:52am
post #2 of 9

Hi, self raising flour is just 1 cup of plain flour with 2 teaspoons of baking powder.

LindaF144a Posted 23 Jun 2011 , 12:04pm
post #3 of 9

2 teaspoons is not the correct amount for conversion to US measurement.

Self-rising flour has 1 teaspoon of baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon salt per cup of flour.

Lita829 Posted 23 Jun 2011 , 12:30pm
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

2 teaspoons is not the correct amount for conversion to US measurement.

Self-rising flour has 1 teaspoon of baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon salt per cup of flour.




You are also using cake flour opposed to AP flour, correct? When I first joined CC back in 2009, I was a part of a yellow cake scratch off and one of the ladies stated to mix 2tsp of baking powder and 1/2 tsp salt per 1 C of CAKE FLOUR. I think that your measurements are right because my cakes made with a recipe using the homemade self-rising cake flour would sometimes fall and I think it was because there was too much baking powder. Thanks for the info icon_smile.gif

LindaF144a Posted 23 Jun 2011 , 12:55pm
post #5 of 9

That is an interesting observation. I did read that self-rising flour is made from a softer wheat just like cake flour. I have yet to find any thing that says if you use cake flour, to use less leavening. The general rule of thumb is 1 tsp to 1 cup flour with no allowance for the less weight of cake flour. That is why I have been starting to question that general rule of thumb.

The best way to tell if you have too much BP is what happens while the cake is baking. Does it rise to a dome and then fall before it comes out of the oven, and then go concave afterwards too? Too much leavening. My scratch cakes will rise and stay risen before coming out of the oven. When they come out, they will settle to a nice flat surface. I also will lightly pat it down while it is still warm and this helps also. But if it stays risen until it is finished baking and out of the oven then it is not a case of too much leavening.

Hope this helps and does not confuse you.

Lita829 Posted 23 Jun 2011 , 1:20pm
post #6 of 9

From what you just described...it was the leavening. It's a good recipe but I got so frustrated because the cakes kept falling so I stopped using it. Its the Magnolia Bakery Lemon Cake Recipe. I haven't tried the recipe in over a year. All other recipes come out fine.

I may retry the Magnolia recipe with the proportions of baking powder that you gave to see how it comes out.

Thanks again icon_smile.gif

LindaF144a Posted 23 Jun 2011 , 1:23pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lita829

From what you just described...it was the leavening. It's a good recipe but I got so frustrated because the cakes kept falling so I stopped using it. Its the Magnolia Bakery Lemon Cake Recipe. I haven't tried the recipe in over a year. All other recipes come out fine.

I may retry the Magnolia recipe with the proportions of baking powder that you gave to see how it comes out.

Thanks again icon_smile.gif




That is the main reason why I don't like their recipes, all that self-rising flour. You have no control over the results. But then again I think that is why you will see some recipes with some self-rising flour and some regular flour added in.

Keep me posted on your results for the cake. I would be curious.

auzzi Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 4:35am
post #8 of 9

1 cup [AU] plain flour [250ml volume] + 2 teaspoons AU baking powder [no salt - bp contains salt] = 1 cup [AU] self raising/rising flour [250ml volume]

1 cup [US] all purpose flour [240ml volume] + 1 or 1.25 or 1.5 teaspoons US baking powder* + 0.25 or 0.5 teaspoons salt* = 1 cup [AU] self raising/rising flour [250ml volume]

Different cup sizes, different baking powders, different wheat flours ...

http://www.kitchensavvy.com/journal/2008/01/self-rising-flo.htmlhttp://www.pastrywiz.com/archive/recipe/0120.htm
http://baking.about.com/cs/hintsandtips/ht/selfrisingflour.htm
http://greekfood.about.com/od/doityourself/qt/farin_ap.htm
http://www.astray.com/recipes/?show=Self-rising%20flour-substitution

Note: UK amounts for baking power per weight/cup plain flour also varies widely.

josefina20 Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 4:56am
post #9 of 9

this is great post, i wanted to make a cake, but i did not have the self R flour the recipe call for, now i can make my own. thanks

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