What Is The Best Frosting Under Fondant?

Decorating By astokes2 Updated 22 Jun 2014 , 5:30pm by deeyama

astokes2 Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 3:19am
post #1 of 23

What is the best recipe to use under fondant on a cake? Is there different options or is buttercream the best choice? Also if you use buttercream, does is have to be a crusting bc?

22 replies
ConfectionsCC Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 3:50am
post #2 of 23

as far as I know, you don't have to have a crusting bc under fondant, I could be wrong though because I use a crusting recipe! I know ganache works very well under fondant because its not as soft, and you can get a nice sharp corner with it. However, its not necessarily for sharp edges! The trick with buttercream under fondant, stick it in the freezer for about 10 minutes, just long enough to firm up the icing, but not freeze the cake! This will help it to keep it's shape while you lay the fondant and smooth! There are different types of icing besides buttercream, but BC is the industry standard for cakes, and its delicious! Try different types of BC, there are several different types, all are very good tasting, but working with them may be slightly different. The funnest part of decorating is making test cakes icon_wink.gif

mena2002 Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 5:46am
post #3 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConfectionsCC

as far as I know, you don't have to have a crusting bc under fondant, I could be wrong though because I use a crusting recipe! I know ganache works very well under fondant because its not as soft, and you can get a nice sharp corner with it. However, its not necessarily for sharp edges! The trick with buttercream under fondant, stick it in the freezer for about 10 minutes, just long enough to firm up the icing, but not freeze the cake! This will help it to keep it's shape while you lay the fondant and smooth! There are different types of icing besides buttercream, but BC is the industry standard for cakes, and its delicious! Try different types of BC, there are several different types, all are very good tasting, but working with them may be slightly different. The funnest part of decorating is making test cakes icon_wink.gif




I agree thumbs_up.gif

cake_architect Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 6:25am
post #4 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConfectionsCC

The trick with buttercream under fondant, stick it in the freezer for about 10 minutes, just long enough to firm up the icing, but not freeze the cake! This will help it to keep it's shape while you lay the fondant and smooth!




that is by far the best advice! i use that trick on every cake i do and it comes out beautiful icon_biggrin.gif

op, i use a non-crusting buttercream recipe and it works wonderful every time!

sweettreat101 Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 7:11am
post #5 of 23

If you want nice sharp edges I use ganache. Otherwise I use a crusting butter cream

1Cake-At-ATime Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 7:11am
post #6 of 23

#1 Ganache
#2 buttercream

If I'm making a white, yellow or lemon cake with a fruit based filling, I will cover the cake with white chocolate ganache before applying fondant. White chocolate and cake is delish.

My buttercream recipe crust really well, but I really like working with chocolate and how it really helps with smoothness of the cakes.

sweettreat101 Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 7:45am
post #7 of 23

Can you give us your white chocolate ganache recipe. I love white chocolate.

TBEANZ Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 7:58am
post #8 of 23

Wow i'm glad i log into this forum. Answered a few question. I often use butter cream and am for ever looking for ways to get a smooth finish. Now i know refridgerate....love it... Thanks guys.

1Cake-At-ATime Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 8:24am
post #9 of 23

Sure!

This is the recipe I use from Planet Cake:

White Chocolate Ganache for Fondant:

600g of white chocolate bark
200ml of cream

For regular chocolate:

600g chocolate bark
300ml cream

If you can't get bark, just take the chocolate bar and with a bread knife starting cutting the chocolate into pieces. The smaller the pieces the smoother the ganache.

Then boil your cream over the stove, once you have a good boil remove from heat. Pour cream over chocolate and stir until smooth.

Leave out for the next day's use. I have learned to just not cut corners and literally make my ganache a day prior so it can sit overnight.

If you used a m'waveable bowl, for the white chocolate, because of the milk, you can put in fridge and then zap it in the m'wave a bid to get it soft.

For me, since I only use aluminum bowls for my chocolate, if I need to soften the white chocolate, I just boil some water in a pot and then place my white chocolate over the steam to soften it up.

The ganache should feel like your mixing peanut butter in the jar.

Oh, I have also did I mixture of the two on one cake. Coat with a thin layer of white chocolate all over cake and then add a sketchy layer of regular chocolate (reg chocolate hardens faster).

What I do is use an aluminum mixing bowl because if I need to soften the white chocolate, I just boil some water in a pot and then place my white chocolate over the steam to soften it up.

If you need to know how much ganache to use for your cakes, I have a ganache calculator I was given from a poster off the Plant Cake forum. I can email it to you if you like.

1Cake-At-ATime Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 8:29am
post #10 of 23

Oh and according to Planet Cake, once the fondant is one the cake, it can be left on the counter. Putting the cakes in the fridge or freezer will cause for condensation.

astokes2 Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 3:57pm
post #11 of 23

So let me get this straight, even if there is dairy in a recipe, once you cover it in fondant you can leave it on the counter? How long can you leave fondant out before it start to gets hard?

1Cake-At-ATime Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 4:05pm
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by astokes2

So let me get this straight, even if there is dairy in a recipe, once you cover it in fondant you can leave it on the counter? How long can you leave fondant out before it start to gets hard?




With white chocolate its best to place it in the fridge overnight.

With the regular chocolate you can leave it out overnight.

I don't understand your other question about leaving fondant out...fondant is non-perishable.

Once the cake is completely covered, you can leave it out or put it in the fridge depending on the brand of fondant you use.

Did I answer your question?

leahk Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 4:23pm
post #13 of 23

The one time I used ganache, I got ownderful edges and coverage, but the fondant became dry and brittle. When I use BC the fondant stays soft. Any tips on how to keep fondant soft when using ganache.

astokes2 Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 4:44pm
post #14 of 23

I wasn't asking about how long fondant is good for ( i know it doesn't go bad ) I was asking how long before it starts to get really hard, i'd like it to still stay pretty soft on the cake and wondering how many days it can sit out before it gets hard. Also, any other opinions about refrigerating cakes with dairy in the frosting? Is it true that once cakes are covered in fondant that they can be left out even with dairy in the recipe?

1Cake-At-ATime Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 4:46pm
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahk

The one time I used ganache, I got ownderful edges and coverage, but the fondant became dry and brittle. When I use BC the fondant stays soft. Any tips on how to keep fondant soft when using ganache.




I use is a combination of wilton and satin ice and haven't experienced problems with dryness.

I could see where the fondant would absorb the BC, therefore, keep it soft. And I think ganache would do the same as it softens. The ganache does get hard, but as time expires it soften up.

Most customers return asking for "that ganache/fondant combo" as they would say it....mostly because the combo is not terribly sweet.

sugarmenot Posted 27 Jun 2012 , 2:50pm
post #16 of 23

Hey there! So I was reading these posts and I'm FREAKING out! I live in Miami FL as you know its very hot and extreamly humid here. I have put the cake in the freezer for 10 minutes to let it get firm. Once that has happened I have put the fondant over the cake and my cake is sagging! I dont know if its because when I take it out of the freezer i put the fondant over it the buttercream sweats or what it is.... any suggestions?!




Quote:
Originally Posted by ConfectionsCC

as far as I know, you don't have to have a crusting bc under fondant, I could be wrong though because I use a crusting recipe! I know ganache works very well under fondant because its not as soft, and you can get a nice sharp corner with it. However, its not necessarily for sharp edges! The trick with buttercream under fondant, stick it in the freezer for about 10 minutes, just long enough to firm up the icing, but not freeze the cake! This will help it to keep it's shape while you lay the fondant and smooth! There are different types of icing besides buttercream, but BC is the industry standard for cakes, and its delicious! Try different types of BC, there are several different types, all are very good tasting, but working with them may be slightly different. The funnest part of decorating is making test cakes icon_wink.gif


Laurelle Pastry Posted 17 Jul 2013 , 1:09am
post #17 of 23

Hai ConfectionCC, do i have to put the cake in the refrigerator after i cover it with fondant, so the bc will not melt and the fondant would not drop down? because every time i cover my cake with bc and cover it with fondant my cake always drop down after the bc melted, and i can not shape the fondant, what did you do to keep the cake sharp edge, if you use bc under it? Thank you for sharing in advance, have a good night.

Laurelle Pastry Posted 17 Jul 2013 , 1:12am
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurelle Pastry 

Hai ConfectionCC, do i have to put the cake in the refrigerator after i cover it with fondant, so the bc will not melt and the fondant would not drop down? because every time i cover my cake with bc and cover it with fondant my cake always drop down after the bc melted, and i can not shape the fondant, what did you do to keep the cake sharp edge, if you use bc under it? Thank you for sharing in advance, have a good night.

Laurelle Pastry Posted 17 Jul 2013 , 1:24am
post #19 of 23

Hai Sugarmenot, that is also happens to my cake, everytime i take it aout from the frezer and covering with fondant my cake become sweating so much nd difficult for me to shape it, and the next my fondant miss shaping and drop down, any body know what to do? thank you for sharing guys, you are the best.

VikaElli Posted 21 Nov 2013 , 4:40am
post #20 of 23

ACan u please email me that recipe as well?

blancaselen3 Posted 18 Mar 2014 , 7:59pm
post #21 of 23

how do you make the ganache?

810whitechoc Posted 19 Mar 2014 , 9:54am
post #22 of 23

Quote:

Originally Posted by blancaselen3 
 

how do you make the ganache?


Look on the first page half way down, if you want any more information on how to make Ganache search recipes there are heaps of threads there.

deeyama Posted 22 Jun 2014 , 5:30pm
post #23 of 23

AThere's also a difference in bc I found. American ones tend to add 1/2 c of milk or similar while in the UK there's only a tbs if any milk. I think the us one is too soft for fondant personally. I prefer the uk recipes. Also I put my cake in the frig vs the freezer overnight so it dries which makes it hold the shape better.

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