Need Advice On What To Charge For This Cake

Decorating By k4of9 Updated 25 Jun 2011 , 8:58pm by mombabytiger

k4of9 Posted 18 Jun 2011 , 12:35am
post #1 of 9

Hello,
Last year I made a wedding cake for my sisters's wedding because she could not afford the cake she wanted. I did it as a gift, but since then I have been asked quite a bit to make cakes for others.
I am by no means a professional cake maker/baker. It is legal in my state to sell baked goods out of your home with the cottage law.
I was recently asked to make a 25th anniversary cake ( 6 days notice) 3 tiers: 12" 9" 6" and it is not for anyone I have ever met. My aunt asked me to do it for her future daughter in laws parents because their original baker fell through & they had both seen some cakes I had recently done.
Now I know that my cakes are not as good as most on here but I really have no idea what to charge since I have never charged before...but I don't want to be asked all the time now just because they think I will do it for super cheap. I am going to try to attach the pictures and I am hoping you can help me with this.
The flames and flags are made out of gumpaste and the the cakes are vanilla and chocolate with vanilla and chocolate buttercream fillings and frosting. They are covered in mmf. Thanks so much for any help. icon_smile.gif

8 replies
cakegirl1973 Posted 18 Jun 2011 , 12:42am
post #2 of 9

Your pictures did not attach. Can you post them via the photo gallery?

k4of9 Posted 18 Jun 2011 , 1:20am
post #3 of 9

Sorry I tried to attach the picture and it just won't go. I don't know what I am doing wrong. I will try the gallery.

BlakesCakes Posted 18 Jun 2011 , 3:54am
post #4 of 9

It's important to know BEFORE you agree to make a cake what you're going to charge--important to both you and the client. You need to know so that you are sure that you're being compensated fairly. They need to know so that they can decide if it fits their expectations & budget. A price should have been set & agreed to before an egg was ever cracked.

Right now, nobody knows..............

You're now in the awkward position of having a finished cake and the recipients have no idea how much $$ they'll be asked to fork over for it. Very, very awkward & uncomfortable for all involved.

Pricing is usually seen as the cost of supplies/ingredients + utilities/overhead+ labor + profit. Some of these are pretty consistent across the country, others vary widely.

Rae

k4of9 Posted 18 Jun 2011 , 4:17am
post #5 of 9

Blakescakes Thank you so much for all your "help". I do realize I should have set a price but I was not dealing with the actual "customer" if you could call it that since this is the first time I am charging for a cake. I was just looking for some friendly advice. Thanks again for all your "help"

BlakesCakes Posted 18 Jun 2011 , 4:27am
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes


Pricing is usually seen as the cost of supplies/ingredients + utilities/overhead+ labor + profit. Some of these are pretty consistent across the country, others vary widely.

Rae




Sure! Better late than never.

Let us know what you come up with when you add up the factors above.

Rae

kakeladi Posted 18 Jun 2011 , 2:32pm
post #7 of 9

Pricing depends a lot on location, type of creation, type of icing used, flowers &/or figures put on and much, much more. As has been pointed out, figure out your supplies, utilities, labor & profit.

From what I read on here a good mediumn going price is around $3 per serving.
The size you state will serve 100 so the price should be a minimum of $300.

mmdiez10 Posted 18 Jun 2011 , 2:51pm
post #8 of 9

I learned the hard way that the most important question you should ask is "what is your budget for this cake"? and take it from there. That will determine the size and effort you put into the cake.

mombabytiger Posted 25 Jun 2011 , 8:58pm
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Quote:

Sure! Better late than never.

Let us know what you come up with when you add up the factors above.

Wow, Rae. You have a lot more patience than I do. I'm pretty sure my answer to the sarcastic thanks for "help", when you actually did offer advice, would not have been this pleasant.


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