Diabetic Cake Help Please!!

Baking By gabbenmom Updated 1 Jul 2011 , 4:48pm by LittleLinda

gabbenmom Posted 17 Jun 2011 , 10:22pm
post #1 of 31

Hi all,
I have a friend that wants a cupcake tower for her sister's baby shower. However, her sister has gestational diabetes. She would like me to make a small cake that is diabetic friendly for her sister. Do any of you have a recipe for cake and/or icing that you know is good and would work?
I appreciate any help that you can give me!!!!

30 replies
Occther Posted 17 Jun 2011 , 10:32pm
post #2 of 31

Does she like cheesecake? You can make a great baked cheesecake with Equal or splenda. I have recipes if interested. They are great for low carb diets.

Sangriacupcake Posted 18 Jun 2011 , 12:26am
post #3 of 31

A plain, low-carb cheesecake is a great idea--and it doesn't need icing. You could stencil a design on it with cocoa powder or drizzle very lightly with some ganache. Other toppings could be served on the side for the other guests to choose. My DD has been a Type 1 diabetic since age 10, and her endocrinologist approves of this dessert!

deah Posted 18 Jun 2011 , 1:00am
post #4 of 31

There's a recipe on Sharon Zambito's website that I have used. I added sour cream for extra moisture but otherwise I follow her recipe. Most people can't tell that it's sugar free. http://sugaredblog.blogspot.com/2008/11/brotherly-love.html or try this if the link is omited - sugaredblog dot blogspot dot com/2008/11/brotherly-love dot html

gabbenmom Posted 20 Jun 2011 , 10:25pm
post #5 of 31

Thank you all so much for the help! Sorry I haven't responded. I haven't had any emails telling me I had responses.
She does want actual cake but I would love to have your cheesecake recipes and ideas. I try to do low carb and both of my parents are diabetic and like cheesecake.
Thank you Deah. I am going to look at your link right now!

Sangriacupcake Posted 20 Jun 2011 , 10:34pm
post #6 of 31

I like to add a couple of handfuls of mini chocolate chips to this:

http://splenda.tastebook.com/recipes?category_id=7-Desserts-Cheesecake&offset=6&recipe_view=true

warchild Posted 20 Jun 2011 , 11:05pm
post #7 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sangriacupcake

I like to add a couple of handfuls of mini chocolate chips to this:

http://splenda.tastebook.com/recipes?category_id=7-Desserts-Cheesecake&offset=6&recipe_view=true




Looks great but the couple handfuls of mini chips have added sugar and are high in carbs for a single small serving (1 tablespoon) so would have to be watched if one has diabeties.

cabecakes Posted 20 Jun 2011 , 11:19pm
post #8 of 31

I purchased a sugar-free cake mix and sugar-free frosting from Wal-mart. I believe it was Duncan Hines. I took it to work for my co-workers and none could tell that they were sugar-free. I didn't tell them until after they were eaten. My husband is diabetic, and he just loves it. You may want to check these items out.

Sangriacupcake Posted 20 Jun 2011 , 11:39pm
post #9 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by warchild

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sangriacupcake

I like to add a couple of handfuls of mini chocolate chips to this:

http://splenda.tastebook.com/recipes?category_id=7-Desserts-Cheesecake&offset=6&recipe_view=true



Looks great but the couple handfuls of mini chips have added sugar and are high in carbs for a single small serving (1 tablespoon) so would have to be watched if one has diabeties.




Yes, you're right! Maybe I just add 1 handful? It's just enough to add a little textural interest, not enough to make it a "chocolate chip" cheesecake.

To the OP: I should also add that my DD can eat a small piece of cake with the icing scraped off, as long as she watches the carb count for the rest of her meal. Maybe the guest of honor can ok that with her doctor. As Warchild pointed out, it's all about the carb count.

FromScratchSF Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 12:07am
post #10 of 31

So I just had a baby, and had a big secret - I had gestational diabetes diagnosed at 32 weeks. It totally sucked, especially as a baker. But call me crazy... I make scratch organic, right? Well, I'd break down and eat one of my cupcakes, say a devil's food cake with vanilla SMBC. At the hour mark I'd test my sugar - it was higher, but didn't go over my target. One day I was out and about and got a junky cupcake from a local shop - tested my sugar and it was crazy high. So, as long as I ate my own baked goods (in moderation, of course) along with the rest of my diet I was fine.

I really believe processed white and powered sugar is a killer. My suggestion, because it worked for me, is to make a scratch chocolate cake using organic sugar, and top it with a SMBC also using organic sugar (SMBC has 1/2 the sugar in it then American Buttercream anyway) as a tester, give it to the friend and see if it spikes her glucose levels. Like I said, it will a bit, but no where near as much as a box cake with crusting buttercream.

Jen

gabbenmom Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 1:17am
post #11 of 31

Sangria- That sounds good! And no sour cream!! I don't like sourcream in cheesecake (not that I am the one eating it)

Cabecakes-that is great news! I will go and see if our stores have those. Do you remember what brand the cake and icing were?

FromScratchSF - that is interesting! I'm not surprised that the organic fresh cupcake was better for you! Your organic sugar- is it like regular granulated sugar, just organic? I have never made a SMBC. I have always wanted to but have never tried it.

I would think the momma to be would be fine eating a small slice of the regular cake as long as she watched the rest of her meal. Her sister wants her to have the sugar free though. Hopefully I can come up with something good!

FromScratchSF Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 2:32am
post #12 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by gabbenmom

FromScratchSF - that is interesting! I'm not surprised that the organic fresh cupcake was better for you! Your organic sugar- is it like regular granulated sugar, just organic? I have never made a SMBC. I have always wanted to but have never tried it.

I would think the momma to be would be fine eating a small slice of the regular cake as long as she watched the rest of her meal. Her sister wants her to have the sugar free though. Hopefully I can come up with something good!




Organic sugar is granulated but not as fine as white, it also is brown in color because they don't wash/bleach out the molassas. It tastes the same as regular sugar in baked goods. I run mine thru the food processor to break it up a little more because depending on my recipe I've had the sugar not dissolve when baked because the crystals are much larger then white sugar.

Sangriacupcake Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 2:50pm
post #13 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

So I just had a baby, and had a big secret - I had gestational diabetes diagnosed at 32 weeks. It totally sucked, especially as a baker. But call me crazy... I make scratch organic, right? Well, I'd break down and eat one of my cupcakes, say a devil's food cake with vanilla SMBC. At the hour mark I'd test my sugar - it was higher, but didn't go over my target. One day I was out and about and got a junky cupcake from a local shop - tested my sugar and it was crazy high. So, as long as I ate my own baked goods (in moderation, of course) along with the rest of my diet I was fine.

I really believe processed white and powered sugar is a killer. My suggestion, because it worked for me, is to make a scratch chocolate cake using organic sugar, and top it with a SMBC also using organic sugar (SMBC has 1/2 the sugar in it then American Buttercream anyway) as a tester, give it to the friend and see if it spikes her glucose levels. Like I said, it will a bit, but no where near as much as a box cake with crusting buttercream.

Jen




I wouldn't give organic ingredients too much credit for moderating your glucose levels. When fat and protein are consumed at the same time, sugar is absorbed more slowly....the eggs and butter of smbc will help keep the sugar from rushing to your bloodstream. This is why someone who is experiencing a low blood sugar episode should not try to correct it with a candy bar or chocolate milk...too much fat and protein!! Also, your scratch cake recipes probably have more fat than box mixes (mine do) and don't rely on a heavy dose of sugar for flavor.

I used to be part of the training team at our local hospital for parents of newly diagnosed diabetic children.

Of course, organic ingredients were wonderful for the baby! I hope you're feeling better now. icon_smile.gif

sacakesandbakes Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 3:55pm
post #14 of 31

Pillsbury has a sugar free line made with splenda. I use to be able to buy sweet and low brand cake mix by the diabetic foods at my grocery store. I would then put sugar free pistachio pudding in the mix and then use another box of pudding for the icing. Still my mother in laws favorite cake. I've even done with the yellow sugar free pillsbury mix. Good luck

FromScratchSF Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 4:48pm
post #15 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sangriacupcake

Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

So I just had a baby, and had a big secret - I had gestational diabetes diagnosed at 32 weeks. It totally sucked, especially as a baker. But call me crazy... I make scratch organic, right? Well, I'd break down and eat one of my cupcakes, say a devil's food cake with vanilla SMBC. At the hour mark I'd test my sugar - it was higher, but didn't go over my target. One day I was out and about and got a junky cupcake from a local shop - tested my sugar and it was crazy high. So, as long as I ate my own baked goods (in moderation, of course) along with the rest of my diet I was fine.

I really believe processed white and powered sugar is a killer. My suggestion, because it worked for me, is to make a scratch chocolate cake using organic sugar, and top it with a SMBC also using organic sugar (SMBC has 1/2 the sugar in it then American Buttercream anyway) as a tester, give it to the friend and see if it spikes her glucose levels. Like I said, it will a bit, but no where near as much as a box cake with crusting buttercream.

Jen



I wouldn't give organic ingredients too much credit for moderating your glucose levels. When fat and protein are consumed at the same time, sugar is absorbed more slowly....the eggs and butter of smbc will help keep the sugar from rushing to your bloodstream. This is why someone who is experiencing a low blood sugar episode should not try to correct it with a candy bar or chocolate milk...too much fat and protein!! Also, your scratch cake recipes probably have more fat than box mixes (mine do) and don't rely on a heavy dose of sugar for flavor.

I used to be part of the training team at our local hospital for parents of newly diagnosed diabetic children.

Of course, organic ingredients were wonderful for the baby! I hope you're feeling better now. icon_smile.gif




Well, I knew I was on to something! I knew zero about DG until I was diagnosed with it... so I think I was right in that what I was eating effected me differently, but your explanation of why makes much more sense! Thanks, because by husband thought I was crazy.

gabbenmom Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 10:06pm
post #16 of 31

Yes Sangria cupcake. I know my dad's nutritionist told him if he has sugar to have some source of protein with it. Makes sense. Thank you!

Thank you Sacakesandbakes. I will have to go to the store and see if I can find a sugar free cake mix. That would make life easier! icon_biggrin.gif

Moovaughan Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 10:31pm
post #17 of 31

Since this is a "extra" cake and not for the whole crowd, go with the Pillsbury cake mix for diabetics, either the yellow or chocolate is good, the chocolate has more flavor to me.... to make it "semi-homemade" you can make the frosting from scratch... take a softened block of cream cheese and a box of sugar free white chocolate pudding mix (or any flavor of sugar free pudding) and some whipping cream (or half and half), beat the cream cheese and powdered pudding, adding a little whipping cream at a time just until you get the consistency of frosting then add a little spenda (2 or 3 packets to taste), a little pinch of salt, a little vanilla extract (or almond extract I like that best) and voila you have a frosting.

Other ways to use the pillsbury cake mix:
Cupcakes and fill them with the above, top them with whipped cream sweetened with splenda and fruit.

But the Best is the Chocolate Orange Triffle:
Bake the Pillsbury Diabetic Chocolate Cake by the box instructions.
In one bowl mix up homemade whipping cream with spenda, 1 tsp orange zest (you may want to add a little orange extract to bring it to taste).
In another bowl mix together white chocolate sugar free pudding with 1/2 block cream cheese (softened), 3 packets of splenda, 1 tsp vanilla extract., pinch of salt..
Shave some Unsweetened Bakers Chocolate (optional)
Now layer, chocolate cake, filling, whipped cream, cake, filling, whipped cream. Top off with whipped cream and sprinkle a litte of the unsweetened chocolate. This is fabulous!

gingerpup84 Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 11:07pm
post #18 of 31

I made a sugar free cake last weekend for a family friend. His wife is soy sensitive, so no boxed mixes!! The cake came out a bit dense, but you might give it a try. If you can use something other than real butter it might be a little lighter.

Yellow cake- makes 2 9" rounds or 1 9X13"
2 sticks of butter at room temp
2 cups of granulated splenda
1 1/4 tsp. vanilla
4 eggs
2 1/2 cups plus 2 TBSP all purpose unbleached flour
6 TBSP cornstarch
1 TBSP baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda
1 cup powdered dry milk
1 cup milk

spray pans with cooking spray and line bottom of pan with wax paper. preheat oven to 350

sift flour, cornstarch, baking powder, salt, baking soda and dry milk.

mix the milk and vanilla

Cream butter and splenda. add eggs one at a time

alternate adding dry ingredients and the milk.

pour into prepared pans and bake for 25-25 minutes.

For icing I used (got this recipe on this site from KRISSY26)

1 Cup Milk
2 small packages of sugar free pudding (I used white chocolate)
1 pint heavy whipping cream.

used whisk attachment on my KA. mixed pudding and milk. then added cream and beat until it was stiff. You can pipe this to some extent if it is REALLY cold. Tastes great though!!

For filling, I used the same recipe but with only one package of chocolate pudding. a little lighter. I could eat that stuff by itself!!

The person the cake was for couldn't believe it was sugar free. Only complaint was the density. I am thinking subbing the butter for margarine or shortening would lighten it up a bit.

KodiSnip Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 11:08pm
post #19 of 31

I made a 90th birthday cake using the sugar free Pillsbury cake mix from walmart. I used a sugar free chocolate pudding and the cake came out very good! I also used a sugar free frosting (sweet & low makes it) to decorate it. The frosting was not very stiff but I whipped it with a few tablespoons of meringue powder that stiffened it up quite a bit. I couldnt smooth it so I used the basketweave technique to decorate the sides of the cake and hide the roughness. HTH

http://cakecentral.com//gallery/1803754

The family could not tell that it was sugar free and ate every last bite

gabbenmom Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 11:15pm
post #20 of 31

Thank you Moovaughn! That sounds delicious!!!

Thank you for sharing all of that Gingerpup84! I appreciate it!

Wow KodiSnip! Your cake looks great! Thank you for all of your help!

KodiSnip Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 1:47am
post #21 of 31

Thanks icon_smile.gif

DreamofAngels Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 2:14am
post #22 of 31

You can use 1 box sugar free instant pudding and whip in 1 pint of heavy whipping cream for an icing you can pipe with and tastes great!

KodiSnip Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 4:32am
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamofAngels

You can use 1 box sugar free instant pudding and whip in 1 pint of heavy whipping cream for an icing you can pipe with and tastes great!




wow... I am going to have to do this soon! Thanks DreamofAngels!

thumbs_up.gif

DreamofAngels Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 2:04pm
post #24 of 31

icon_biggrin.gif My pleasure! BTW...I used a frnch vanilla flavored one and when the "icing" dried it was very yellow in color. I never realized how much food coloring they added. You may want to use plain vanilla or even white chocolate and add your own coloring.

KodiSnip Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 2:22am
post #25 of 31

Good to know... my dad is diabetic and loves loves loves chocolate cake. If I make a cake and use the french vanilla good to know I won't have to dye it yellow for a summery cake...

madcobbler Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 2:35am
post #26 of 31

Check out the splenda website for sugarfree icing and cake recipes. I use the granulated splenda splenda for baking. Not the concentrated stuff in the little yellow packets.

cakeladytx Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 2:46am
post #27 of 31

I just made my first sugar free cake last nite for a customer. I got the pilsbury chocolate cake mix and made the icing out of vanilla pudding, heavy whipping cream and milk and it suprisingly tasted good. My family tasted the cake scraps and couldn't believe it was sugar free. The only problem I had was that I made a gumpaste plaque with an edible image and did the lettering out of gumpaste and this morning when I went to box up the cake the gumpaste had turned to liquid. Luckily I had found this out early enough where I could scrape it off and redo without using gumpaste. I got an email from the customer and everyone loved the cake and said it was good and they couldn't believe it was sugar free. But has anyone ever had this happen with the gumpaste before? Was it because of the icing?

KodiSnip Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 1:05pm
post #28 of 31

I had the same happen to me with the sugar free cake I made. Thats why i went with regular buttercream roses. The roses were for decoration only and when the cake was served the roses were scraped off so that the cake remained diabetic friendly.

I personally think the chemicals involved in processing "sugar free" disintegrates the fondant and gumpaste.

MamaMarsha Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 2:02pm
post #29 of 31

I haven't tried this yet but will be for my mom's birthday cake next month.

Sugar Free buttercream icing

Ingredients

1 and 1/2 cups of powdered sugar replacement (recipe will follow below)
1/2 cup Crisco
1 tsp. clear vanilla
1 tbls. whole milk
.
SUGAR FREE POWDERED SUGAR REPLACMENT ------------------------------------
1 cup nonfat dry milk
1 cup cornstarch
2/3 cup sugar replacement (Sugar Twin is the recommended product)



Directions
Cream the shortening (Crisco) and vanilla until fluffy. Blend in the powdered sugar replacement until well blended. Add a little more milk if this mixture is to stiff to spread on the cake. You can use a bit of food coloring to some of the frosting and use it for decorations.

SUGAR FREE POWDERED SUGAR REPLACMENT ------------------------------------

Combine all the ingredients in a food processor or blender and whip until blended and powdered.

gingerpup84 Posted 29 Jun 2011 , 10:21pm
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeladytx

But has anyone ever had this happen with the gumpaste before? Was it because of the icing?




I had the same thing happen with my sugar free cake, but with fondant. I was thinking it might have been the oil content in the tiny bit of shortening in my fondant reacting to the cream in the icing, but if you had it happen with gumpaste I am not sure since gumpaste typically doesn't have any kind of oil. I was thinking next time I would use gumpaste instead of fondant. I will be very interested to see if anyone knows why this happens.

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