Cupcakes Doming

Baking By likes_2_create Updated 28 Jun 2011 , 2:02am by 4realLaLa

likes_2_create Posted 15 Jun 2011 , 9:33pm
post #1 of 21

How do I get my cupcakes to dome nicely in the center? Mine are usually flat.

20 replies
SarahBeth3 Posted 15 Jun 2011 , 9:42pm
post #2 of 21

Would changing the temperature do it?

Sangriacupcake Posted 15 Jun 2011 , 10:37pm
post #3 of 21

Baking at 375 will help get a nice, rounded dome.

likes_2_create Posted 16 Jun 2011 , 12:46am
post #4 of 21

Do I need to adjust the time at all?

LindaF144a Posted 16 Jun 2011 , 12:50am
post #5 of 21

It is best to alter the recipe to get them to dome really. You can try turning it up, but you won't get a nice dome. It is all in the recipe. I just spent the last week altering mine to get the result I wanted.

Posting your recipe is the best way to get to the bottom of it.

You can try raising the temp, but in my experience it doesn't give a nice dome, but rather a small pointed dome.

likes_2_create Posted 16 Jun 2011 , 12:55am
post #6 of 21

what types of things would I need to alter in a box mix? Since I just bake at home for my family I don't always alter a mix. Same with a recipe from scratch-I just follow the recipe I wouldn't know know what to do to alter it correctly. I don't have a specific recipe in question.

HappyCake10609 Posted 16 Jun 2011 , 1:03am
post #7 of 21

I have great luck by starting by oven at a higher temp. I preheat my oven to 425, I pop the cupcakes and set the oven for 5 min, then turn down the temp to 350 to continue baking, usually takes another 10-15 min. I use this method with all of my recipes, but I do primarily use different version of the WASC recipe. I did use it with the Hershey's Perfectly Chocolate Chocolate Cake though, which is a scratch recipe.

LindaF144a Posted 16 Jun 2011 , 1:30am
post #8 of 21

Sorry, I didn't know you meant a box. You can't alter it. You probably have to do the heat thing. Or you can leave it sit on the counter for 20 minutes before you put it in. That used to work for me.

Sangriacupcake Posted 16 Jun 2011 , 2:02am
post #9 of 21

I have yet to find a recipe that doesn't dome at 375. Some also work at 400, but some of my recipes rose too fast at that temp and cracked.

So, to answer your question, yes, I bake all cupcakes at 375. I also fill them with my scoop that measures 1 5/8 oz (3 T.) The combination works perfectly for me.

SarahBeth3 Posted 16 Jun 2011 , 2:07am
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

Or you can leave it sit on the counter for 20 minutes before you put it in. That used to work for me.




I've never heard of this before. How handy! I'm wondering, can you explain why this works? (sorry, I'm just curious & think this sort of stuff is so fascinating!) Thanks.

Karadactyl Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 4:24pm
post #11 of 21

I bake with a doctored mix. I preheat the oven to 400 degrees, pop them in for 7 minutes. Then I turned it down to 350 until they're done. Works every time.

SweetSouthernBakery Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 4:43pm
post #12 of 21

Leaving it out on the counter usually makes things NOT dome. That is why you set things out and let them come to room temp when your baking a cake that you don't want to dome. I can't help with helping them dome because normally I'm spending my time trying to get things not to dome. But what I do to help with that is let it come to room temp and bake on a lower temp. So maybe to counter act that use everything cold and bake a higher temp and it might help things dome. Good luck.

LindaF144a Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 6:34pm
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdrb84

Leaving it out on the counter usually makes things NOT dome. That is why you set things out and let them come to room temp when your baking a cake that you don't want to dome. I can't help with helping them dome because normally I'm spending my time trying to get things not to dome. But what I do to help with that is let it come to room temp and bake on a lower temp. So maybe to counter act that use everything cold and bake a higher temp and it might help things dome. Good luck.




No this is not true. Rose Levenbaum (sp?) of The Cake Bible suggests this, plus my own person experience has shown that cupcakes that have sat out waiting for their turn in the oven dome higher than cupcakes that have not waited.

My experience has been for scratch recipes only.

And the reason why you let things come to room temp before you use them is not to prevent doming, but to ensure that all your products mix well together. It is difficult to get butter and sugar to cream together without lumps with cold butter. And cold eggs will make the batter curdle and lose all the air you just put in by creaming the butter and sugar together. I have never read anything where that says it is because you want to prevent doming. If this is the case then I am baking cold from now on. It will save me tons of time.

kimmisue2009 Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 6:42pm
post #14 of 21

Without fail and for every recipe I have used, when I preheat to 400 degrees, and then turn down to 350 as I put them in, they dome like magic. Every single time. Between batches, I heat the oven back to 400.

4realLaLa Posted 27 Jun 2011 , 7:49pm
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

Quote:
Originally Posted by sdrb84

Leaving it out on the counter usually makes things NOT dome. That is why you set things out and let them come to room temp when your baking a cake that you don't want to dome. I can't help with helping them dome because normally I'm spending my time trying to get things not to dome. But what I do to help with that is let it come to room temp and bake on a lower temp. So maybe to counter act that use everything cold and bake a higher temp and it might help things dome. Good luck.



No this is not true. Rose Levenbaum (sp?) of The Cake Bible suggests this, plus my own person experience has shown that cupcakes that have sat out waiting for their turn in the oven dome higher than cupcakes that have not waited.

My experience has been for scratch recipes only.

And the reason why you let things come to room temp before you use them is not to prevent doming, but to ensure that all your products mix well together. It is difficult to get butter and sugar to cream together without lumps with cold butter. And cold eggs will make the batter curdle and lose all the air you just put in by creaming the butter and sugar together. I have never read anything where that says it is because you want to prevent doming. If this is the case then I am baking cold from now on. It will save me tons of time.




I agree. I let my butter and eggs come to room temp first and my cakes don't dome. I do it for the same reason, so they will cream better and without lumps. I do however want my cupcakes to dome and they don't so maybe I will try the temp thing.

LindaF144a Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 1:03am
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4realLaLa

Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

Quote:
Originally Posted by sdrb84

Leaving it out on the counter usually makes things NOT dome. That is why you set things out and let them come to room temp when your baking a cake that you don't want to dome. I can't help with helping them dome because normally I'm spending my time trying to get things not to dome. But what I do to help with that is let it come to room temp and bake on a lower temp. So maybe to counter act that use everything cold and bake a higher temp and it might help things dome. Good luck.



No this is not true. Rose Levenbaum (sp?) of The Cake Bible suggests this, plus my own person experience has shown that cupcakes that have sat out waiting for their turn in the oven dome higher than cupcakes that have not waited.

My experience has been for scratch recipes only.

And the reason why you let things come to room temp before you use them is not to prevent doming, but to ensure that all your products mix well together. It is difficult to get butter and sugar to cream together without lumps with cold butter. And cold eggs will make the batter curdle and lose all the air you just put in by creaming the butter and sugar together. I have never read anything where that says it is because you want to prevent doming. If this is the case then I am baking cold from now on. It will save me tons of time.



I agree. I let my butter and eggs come to room temp first and my cakes don't dome. I do it for the same reason, so they will cream better and without lumps. I do however want my cupcakes to dome and they don't so maybe I will try the temp thing.


No, you don't understand. The temp thing will not make your cupcakes dome. It will make your batter curdle and not create an emulsion. Which will in fact prevent your cupcakes from rising, the very opposite of what you want to achieve.

4realLaLa Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 1:16am
post #17 of 21

Linda by the time I saw your comment/reply about the temp, I had already tried it. I set the temp to 375 degrees (convection) for the first 5 minutes then reduced it to 325 for the remainder of the time. It totatlly worked! Those cuppies were so beautifully domed. I'm gonna try it once more but this time with my chocolate cuppies to make sure it wasn't just a fluke.

4realLaLa Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 1:16am
post #18 of 21

Linda by the time I saw your comment/reply about the temp, I had already tried it. I set the temp to 375 degrees (convection) for the first 5 minutes then reduced it to 325 for the remainder of the time. It totatlly worked! Those cuppies were so beautifully domed. I'm gonna try it once more but this time with my chocolate cuppies to make sure it wasn't just a fluke.

4realLaLa Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 1:16am
post #19 of 21

Linda by the time I saw your comment/reply about the temp, I had already tried it. I set the temp to 375 degrees (convection) for the first 5 minutes then reduced it to 325 for the remainder of the time. It totatlly worked! Those cuppies were so beautifully domed. I'm gonna try it once more but this time with my chocolate cuppies to make sure it wasn't just a fluke.

LindaF144a Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 1:51am
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4realLaLa

Linda by the time I saw your comment/reply about the temp, I had already tried it. I set the temp to 375 degrees (convection) for the first 5 minutes then reduced it to 325 for the remainder of the time. It totatlly worked! Those cuppies were so beautifully domed. I'm gonna try it once more but this time with my chocolate cuppies to make sure it wasn't just a fluke.




Ooops my bad. I thought you meant you were going to try cold butter, not adjust the temp of your oven, duh!

Yes, that will work. I don't do it because I would have to wait for the oven to heat back up again for the next batch of cupcakes. So I stopped doing it.

Sorry to misunderstand.

4realLaLa Posted 28 Jun 2011 , 2:02am
post #21 of 21

No problem Linda. I probably was not clear.

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