Buttercream In Summer Heat??

Decorating By tara7778 Updated 16 Jun 2011 , 3:10am by HomemadeUpgrade

tara7778 Posted 15 Jun 2011 , 12:46pm
post #1 of 10

I have 3 large cakes coming up this summer and they are all for outdoor parties/receptions. I was not very concerned until last weekend i had a small cake that completely failed due to the heat and the melting of my american buttercream. I used butter not shortening. My question is: does shortening hold up better to summer heat? What do other decorators do when they have to make a cake for a summer outdoor event?? Will fondant be better...or will the BC still melt under it and create a huge mess? Help please

9 replies
LindaF144a Posted 15 Jun 2011 , 1:01pm
post #2 of 10

Definitely take out some of the butter and use some shortening, try a 80 butter/20 shortening type thing.

The shortening has a higher melting point than butter and will not melt as fast.

I would also educate the customer to keep the cake indoors until it is served. If they do not have air conditioning then put it in the fridge until about 30 to 45 minutes depending on the size of the cake.

You could also try an all shortening recipe. There are several listed in the recipe section. Indydeb's recipe is the first one that comes to mind. Especially because you are new here, you might not know that there are a lot of other recipes that are better for the heat than the one you mention.

MadMillie Posted 15 Jun 2011 , 1:03pm
post #3 of 10

Do not use butter in this kind of heat. You may want to buy some high ratio shortening and use Sugarshacks recipe or use IndyDebi's recipe with Crisco. Keep it inside for as long as possible. It has been 100 plus here for the past day or so. Butter wouldn't even hold up in my house right now and I keep it around 75.

dmo4ab Posted 15 Jun 2011 , 1:06pm
post #4 of 10

IndyDebi's crisco based buttercream is wonderful in high humidity (not to mention great tasting!). I iced a cake last year for a 4th of July outdoor party in Alabama 90 degrees 98% humidity and it held up perfectly fine.

poohsmomma Posted 15 Jun 2011 , 1:09pm
post #5 of 10

Indydeb's buttercream holds up great. I had one cake set outside at a pool party in July in KY. Another sat in the trunk of a car (yes, I cringe, too, when I think of it) while the family ate at a restaurant on a 90 degree day. Both held up perfectly.
I realize you might rather use butter based icings, but some times just call for shortening.

LKing12 Posted 15 Jun 2011 , 1:14pm
post #6 of 10

Last week I had a groom's cake for a friend. It was 94 degrees and the heat index was over 100. I used IndiDebi's bc recipe for the first time. When I delivered the cake at 5:00 the table was in the sun. My friend assured me that it would be in the shade soon. Well, the next day the lady that cut the cake told me the cake looked terrific and tasted great and that was at 7:30. So, it has passed my test for heat resistance.
(It was also very easy to work with.)

LindaF144a Posted 15 Jun 2011 , 1:27pm
post #7 of 10

Well there you go. You have had 4 people tell you the same thing I did. I guess that means it will work.

tara7778 Posted 15 Jun 2011 , 5:00pm
post #8 of 10

thanks everyone! i found sugarshacks recipe the other day and i am def going to try it. I really appreciate everyones input.

LindaF144a Posted 15 Jun 2011 , 5:06pm
post #9 of 10

No offense to sugarshack and I am sure it is good. It is just that Indydeb's recipe is made from items that are readily available at your local grocer. I just wanted to point out that difference.

HomemadeUpgrade Posted 16 Jun 2011 , 3:10am
post #10 of 10

I modified Indydeb's recipe a bit. I use 1/2 cup butter and the rest shortening.

I sell cupcakes at a farmers market and it has been well over 100 degrees and my cupcakes hold up perfectly. No melting frosting at all. icon_smile.gif

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