aandsmommy Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 6:44pm
post #1 of

I had a customer come in for a tasting (they are complimentary when I choose the flavors (5 flavors of cake and fillings) and $35 if they want custom). She had a complimentary tasting...wanted to book and me to purchase a custom damask cupcake stand from etsy. I would not be able to resuse the cupcake stand and told her she was more than welcome to purchase it for her wedding. She also wanted another tasting to taste cream cheese frosting...I told her she could come in this weekend since I had a cake for with cream cheese frosting this weekend, but she cannot come until August...so I told her she was more than welcome to have another tasting in August for $35, or purchase some cupcakes. Anyhow she responded with this:

"I think there has been a miscommunication, and sense an underlying tension in our email exchange. From the beginning I knew that I wanted the red velvet cupcakes with cream cheese frosting. The tasting was very nice but all I really wanted was to do is know what I was purchasing for the wedding. I dont think $35 worth of cupcakes, or driving down to XXXX to pick them up this past weekend, is a good indicator for future collaboration, and conveys significant inflexibility. I dont think it is going to work for me, and I have decided to go with another vendor.'

No big deal...happy to pass on this, but do I respond? I guess she thinks I am inflexible because of the cupcake stand and not just having cream cheese forosting kicking around on the exact day that she wants it. You guys are so good at responding.

Thanks!

37 replies
AnotherCaker Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 6:51pm
post #2 of

Yeah, because cream cheese frosting is so different and unique from baker to baker.

aandsmommy Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 6:54pm
post #3 of

ha!!! spit my water everywhere...hilarious! that is an excellent response icon_wink.gif.

jason_kraft Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 6:56pm
post #4 of

I think a generic response is in order, thanking the customer for considering you and wishing her the best of luck with her event.

She's probably expecting you to try to negotiate the price of the tasting or the cupcakes to keep her business, so it will be interesting to see her response.

leah_s Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 6:58pm
post #5 of

Nah, I never respond to crap like that. NEXT!

EmmyNoah Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 7:08pm
post #6 of

I would say to her, "Thank you for your note. I apologize if you felt there was any underlying tension and that you misunderstood my policies regarding tasting and fees. I always strive to make my customers feel comfortable and if possible and when reasonable, try to do the best I can to deliver what they request. My best wishes to you for a very successful event (wedding)."

kneenah Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 7:11pm
post #7 of

I wouldnt reply cuz no matter how nice and direct u put the message she will think u are coming out with attitude. Best way to look at it is. It cant please every body.

amberhoney Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 7:18pm
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmmyNoah

I would say to her, "Thank you for your note. I apologize if you felt there was any underlying tension and that you misunderstood my policies regarding tasting and fees. I always strive to make my customers feel comfortable and if possible and when reasonable, try to do the best I can to deliver what they request. My best wishes to you for a very successful event (wedding)."




This one! Polite, firm and to the point. There is nothing in there that will make good fodder for her to bad-mouth you to anyone likely to place future orders with you. And you are not left with that awful feeling that you shoulda woulda coulda. Nuff said thumbs_up.gif

ccr03 Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 7:49pm
post #9 of

"Thank you for considering me and once again, congratulations on your wedding.

If I can be of any further assistance, whether for a groom's cake or any other occassion, please let me know. "

jenmat Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 8:07pm

Good Grief. Having not read the entire email exchange, I can't attest to the "underlying tension," but you have a policy, you stuck to it. So she was looking for a wishy-wasy doormat. Guess she needs to keep looking.

I'd send Emmynoah's response verbatim. No explantation, nothing but a polite recognition of her feelings and letting her know you aren't crying into your cheerios over her sensitivity to actually pay for things.

LKing12 Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 8:11pm

I wouldn't respond. Too much drama. You have a policy and she wants to drag you to the edge.

carmijok Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 8:15pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by amberhoney

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmmyNoah

I would say to her, "Thank you for your note. I apologize if you felt there was any underlying tension and that you misunderstood my policies regarding tasting and fees. I always strive to make my customers feel comfortable and if possible and when reasonable, try to do the best I can to deliver what they request. My best wishes to you for a very successful event (wedding)."



This one! Polite, firm and to the point. There is nothing in there that will make good fodder for her to bad-mouth you to anyone likely to place future orders with you. And you are not left with that awful feeling that you shoulda woulda coulda. Nuff said thumbs_up.gif




Totally agree!

imagenthatnj Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 8:17pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

Quote:
Originally Posted by amberhoney

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmmyNoah

I would say to her, "Thank you for your note. I apologize if you felt there was any underlying tension and that you misunderstood my policies regarding tasting and fees. I always strive to make my customers feel comfortable and if possible and when reasonable, try to do the best I can to deliver what they request. My best wishes to you for a very successful event (wedding)."



This one! Polite, firm and to the point. There is nothing in there that will make good fodder for her to bad-mouth you to anyone likely to place future orders with you. And you are not left with that awful feeling that you shoulda woulda coulda. Nuff said thumbs_up.gif



Totally agree!




Me too.

BlakesCakes Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 8:31pm

No response. Not worth the time or trouble.

If she's too dense to understand that if she'd originally said, "I want to taste RED VELVET W/ CREAM CHEESE ICING.", she would have had to pay $35, but got a FREE tasting because she took the "Baker's Choice" option (I guess hoping she'd get lucky & score an RVCC??), then she'd never understand the other complexities involved in creating a real order using a contract & making a deposit.

So much the better.

Rae

CarolinaCakeMom Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 8:55pm

If you must send a response, do not apologize (...sorry you did not...). It sounds like there is no apology necessary. I would also not point out that she did not understand your policy. It seems like she is a stressed out bride. On another day, she may see the light and realize you were a good option. I would give her a sincere thank you for considering and ignore the underlying tension crack.

aandsmommy Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 9:00pm

well i did feel the need to respond...i did not apologize...took out that first portion and used the second half of Emmy's response...thank you EmmyNoah and everyone else who responded. I am sure it will fizzle out to nothing and I won't hear from her again, but I feel better that I did respond.

Thank you!

Annabakescakes Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 5:52am
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj

Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

Quote:
Originally Posted by amberhoney

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmmyNoah

I would say to her, "Thank you for your note. I apologize if you felt there was any underlying tension and that you misunderstood my policies regarding tasting and fees. I always strive to make my customers feel comfortable and if possible and when reasonable, try to do the best I can to deliver what they request. My best wishes to you for a very successful event (wedding)."



This one! Polite, firm and to the point. There is nothing in there that will make good fodder for her to bad-mouth you to anyone likely to place future orders with you. And you are not left with that awful feeling that you shoulda woulda coulda. Nuff said thumbs_up.gif



Totally agree!



Me too.




I am wired and done with cakes, so i am reading old threads, but I have to comment on this one!

I think the "when reasonable" part implies that you couldn't please her or "make her comfortable" because she was being unreasonable! Which is a little passive/agressive jab I would love to say to someone's face with a smile and feined innocence, and dare them (silently,with my eyes) to say something about it, lol! But I don't think that is what most of you meant.

I know if someone sent me a message like that, I would be wonderin and even asking people around me (or on here!) "Was that Be-otch trying to say I was being unresonable???"

costumeczar Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 2:07pm

Personally, I wouldn't have bothered to respond. If she writes you back don't respond to that, there's no point.

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 2:25pm

This is funny, we had almost this exact situation about a month ago with a bride, and all over wanting to taste Red Velvet w/Cream Cheese! What is it about that flavor??? icon_wink.gif

Melvira Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 2:58pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMaster2009

This is funny, we had almost this exact situation about a month ago with a bride, and all over wanting to taste Red Velvet w/Cream Cheese! What is it about that flavor??? icon_wink.gif




I can honestly *guess* that it's because with this flavor you either get really good or really bad. I've never really tasted 'so-so' RVCC. They've probably tasted both good and bad and want to be sure it's good where they're ordering it. icon_lol.gif

Kitagrl Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 3:00pm

Probably wouldn't have responded, or maybe just a "Thank you for letting me know, best of luck with your wedding."

She knew up front that she'd have to pay for a custom tasting. Sounds like she was trying to get out of that. I hate when people say "I would like the complimentary tasting but could you include X flavor????" haha.

If I'm in a good mood and X flavor is in the fridge, then sure...if not....then that is a CUSTOM tasting and costs money!

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 4:02pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melvira


I can honestly *guess* that it's because with this flavor you either get really good or really bad. I've never really tasted 'so-so' RVCC. They've probably tasted both good and bad and want to be sure it's good where they're ordering it. icon_lol.gif




Probably so. I guess my potential bride just didn't want to try it bad enough to pay for it. icon_rolleyes.gif

Melvira Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 10:29pm

Do I EVER know your pain!!! icon_mad.gif I had a bride that I was very excited to work with, she wanted a cheesecake wedding!! FUN! And I happen to make really good cheesecake in my narrow opinion. So, she's an out-of-town bride, coming back to the area for her wedding. I make her four different kinds of cheesecake at no charge. (I don't normally do it that way, but was feeling generous I guess??) 2 weeks later she emails me and says she loves the cheesecake, but thinks it will be easier to do cupcakes (in other words, cheaper!) so she wants to change it all. Of course she wants to try some cupcakes now. *sigh* No problem... but it won't be free. I can tell ya that much! icon_rolleyes.gif Hahaha. But she's a very nice girl so I'm trying not to yell at her. icon_lol.gif

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 10:41pm

Bummer! At least she's nice though! icon_smile.gif

This girl was NOT nice.

Kitagrl Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 10:53pm

I don't get why they have to try EVERYthing...I mean really, if your cheesecake is awesome, she should be thankful for that and just assume your cuppies are good, too!

Melvira Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 10:55pm

Yah, I have to agree that makes ALL the difference. I am the type of person who will go above and beyond for someone if they are just a little nice to me, you know? And I believe common courtesy is anything but! If more people were kind to each other, we'd have so many fewer problems in the world today. It's just sad because so many people are out there to use and abuse as many people as they can. thumbsdown.gif But like I said, when someone is nice to me, that cuts a lot more ice than being pushy and crabby!

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 11:03pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

I don't get why they have to try EVERYthing...I mean really, if your cheesecake is awesome, she should be thankful for that and just assume your cuppies are good, too!




This I will never understand. icon_rolleyes.gif

Melvira, my thoughts exactly! thumbs_up.gif

gatorcake Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 11:09pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

I don't get why they have to try EVERYthing...I mean really, if your cheesecake is awesome, she should be thankful for that and just assume your cuppies are good, too!




Never been to a restaurant where you have one thing that is really good and then try something else only to find out they don't do it so well? She should be thankful for all the work that went into the first tasting (and from the tenor of the post it seems like she is). Why does that mean she should not request another tasting and just take it on faith (especially if she is going to be charged for it)?

Cake is not cheesecake and simply because the client liked the cheesecake does not mean she would like the cupcakes. In all likelihood she will, but given that tastings are the way that clients select cake businesses, it seems only natural for her to request a tasting. IDK from the post it does not appear the individual is being troublesome by requesting a cupcake tasting.

Kitagrl Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 11:12pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorcake

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

I don't get why they have to try EVERYthing...I mean really, if your cheesecake is awesome, she should be thankful for that and just assume your cuppies are good, too!



Never been to a restaurant where you have one thing that is really good and then try something else only to find out they don't do it so well? She should be thankful for all the work that went into the first tasting (and from the tenor of the post it seems like she is). Why does that mean she should not request another tasting and just take it on faith (especially if she is going to be charged for it)?

Cake is not cheesecake and simply because the client liked the cheesecake does not mean she would like the cupcakes. In all likelihood she will, but given that tastings are the way that clients select cake businesses, it seems only natural for her to request a tasting. IDK from the post it does not appear the individual is being troublesome by requesting a cupcake tasting.




At the same time...if I take a group to a restaurant, I don't get to taste everything on the menu before buying dinner...

gatorcake Posted 2 Jul 2011 , 11:47pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorcake

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

I don't get why they have to try EVERYthing...I mean really, if your cheesecake is awesome, she should be thankful for that and just assume your cuppies are good, too!



Never been to a restaurant where you have one thing that is really good and then try something else only to find out they don't do it so well? She should be thankful for all the work that went into the first tasting (and from the tenor of the post it seems like she is). Why does that mean she should not request another tasting and just take it on faith (especially if she is going to be charged for it)?

Cake is not cheesecake and simply because the client liked the cheesecake does not mean she would like the cupcakes. In all likelihood she will, but given that tastings are the way that clients select cake businesses, it seems only natural for her to request a tasting. IDK from the post it does not appear the individual is being troublesome by requesting a cupcake tasting.



At the same time...if I take a group to a restaurant, I don't get to taste everything on the menu before buying dinner...




True but that is not the protocol for restaurants. Tastings are how individuals decide who makes their wedding cake. So a client is locked in to everything else they make based on tasting one item? If that is the case then why not simply offer a basic cake yellow cake with buttercream? If they like it they should like everything else?

If the individual is gladly willing to pay for the tasting (and are being civil, cordial, nice, or whatever term works here) I don't see them as being unreasonable, burdensome because they opted to go in a different direction (if based on cost) and want to know that by going this new direction this is still the best person for them.

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