Just Because It Pours Doesn't Make It A "liquid"

Baking By katnmouse Updated 13 Jun 2011 , 6:42pm by indydebi

katnmouse Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 1:19pm
post #1 of 12

Learned that lesson this weekend when I tried to use half/half as my liquid component in my WASC cupcakes (ran out of reg. milk). I debated using water vs. half/half and I stupidly thought the half/half would have to be better because it would add an additional fat component. Nope. Cupcakes still tasted good but the texture and cake color was way off. Unfortunately I took them to a family reunion where my MIL had bragged to everyone about how great they were going to be. icon_redface.gif

11 replies
Sangriacupcake Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 1:50pm
post #2 of 12

I learned that lesson the hard way, too. icon_sad.gif Sometimes you can substitute a different liquid, and sometimes it just ruins the batter... I've had much more success using sour cream as the "liquid" than cream or milk, although I'm not sure why.

I wish I understood more about the science of baking, because I just love experimenting in the kitchen. I measure carefully, take notes, perform post-mortems on my cakes, and turn every family gathering into a blind taste test!! My DH is a chemical engineer, and he's always joking that after 30 years of marriage, his influence has finally rubbed off on me!!

bakingpw Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 2:13pm
post #3 of 12

Sour cream is actually considered a "solid" not liquid ingredient. To substitute for sour cream, yogurt (also a solid) could be used as it is basically the same consistency.

cakegirl1973 Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 2:31pm
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakingpw

Sour cream is actually considered a "solid" not liquid ingredient. To substitute for sour cream, yogurt (also a solid) could be used as it is basically the same consistency.




I have subbed sour cream for milk, but only when I want the texture of the cake to be more dense. This works great for the Hershey cake recipe.

Sangriacupcake Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 2:34pm
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakegirl1973

Quote:
Originally Posted by bakingpw

Sour cream is actually considered a "solid" not liquid ingredient. To substitute for sour cream, yogurt (also a solid) could be used as it is basically the same consistency.



I have subbed sour cream for milk, but only when I want the texture of the cake to be more dense. This works great for the Hershey cake recipe.




That's exactly what I do, and I much prefer the recipe with sour cream. I've also tried using sour cream in other recipes, and sometimes it seems to work fine, sometimes not-so-much!

indydebi Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 4:41pm
post #6 of 12

off topic, but since there are a few sour cream users here.....

I've read so much about folks using sour cream and how it really adds to the cake. Can you taste the sour cream at all?

Because I detest sour cream. My oldest daughter jokes about how she was 'deprived' of sour cream until she was in her 20's ".....because MOM didn't let us have it because MOM didn't like it!" icon_lol.gif I got a free meal at taco bell years (!) ago because they put sour cream on my food (yes, I ordered it w/o sour cream; yes, I threw a fit; yes, I became one of "those" customers! tapedshut.gif )

So what does it do to the taste?

motherofgrace Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 4:54pm
post #7 of 12

Indydebi, doesnt change the taste at all. I once gave my cake to a friend who said

" thanks for not making me one of your sour cream cakes"

I laughed and said " oh you like this one?"

Friend " Yes its delicous"

Me" LOL it is made with sour cream!"


She never questioned my recipes again!

And I HATE sour cream as well!

katnmouse Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 4:57pm
post #8 of 12

I don't find any flavor impact with the sour cream vs. no sour cream. However, the disclaimer would be that I like sour cream therefore I wouldn't be looking for any "off" taste. I would compare the use of sour cream to buttermilk. It acts as a chemical component rather than a flavor one.

Sangriacupcake Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 5:22pm
post #9 of 12

The sour cream can't be tasted, but it does give cakes a rich, creamy taste and and velvety texture. I swear it's my secret weapon.

cookiemama2 Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 5:42pm
post #10 of 12

My hubby hates sour cream, but as long as he doesn't see me use it he can't taste it!
I use it when I make whip cream...throw in a few spoonfuls and it stablizes the whip cream and he can't taste it in there either!

Herekittykitty Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 6:02pm
post #11 of 12

I'm with you Debbie. Hate, hate, hate sour cream. Took forever for me to try the WASC recipe. Now it is the only one I'll use. Can't taste the SC at all.

indydebi Posted 13 Jun 2011 , 6:42pm
post #12 of 12

Ok.... I'm inspired now! I have an 80th birthday cake to make for an aunt next week and I;m going to give it a try! thanks!!

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