How Should I Handle?

Decorating By maude Updated 12 Jun 2011 , 11:36pm by maude

maude Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 5:46pm
post #1 of 12

I received a call from a client who had sent her husband to pick up a cake this morning. She stated that the banner had fallen off the cake and broke in half. It was fine and boxed when he picked it up. It gave her some suggestions on how she could try and repair it. I then offered to give her a partial refund or a discount on her next cake. Not sure if I should have done that because I don't know how the cake was handled after it was picked up. What would you guys have done?

11 replies
Kaykaymay Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 5:59pm
post #2 of 12

Was it a topper or was it stuck to the side of the cake? If it stuck to the side I think a refund would be in order because that most likely means that it was not attached to the cake properly.

Paperfishies Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 6:00pm
post #3 of 12

I really don't understand why people call and complain about things that are obviously their fault. That would be like me going to the grocery, getting home, unpacking everything and dropping a glass jar of pickles on the floor and it shaterring. "Um, hey grocery store, I was unpacking my groceries and dropped my pickles, what can you do about that?"

Or, "Hey Nordstroms, I just bought a $150 bottle of perfume at your store but when I got home I was taking it out of the box and dropped it on my tile bathroom floor, do ya think you can replace it?"

Makes zero sense.

I think offering her a discount was very generous of you. I probably would have offered a discount as well just to make the person feel like they're getting some kind of deal.

I'm seriously contemplating making up a contract stating that if you choose to pick up your cake/cupcakes/dessert that once it leaves my presence, it is no longer my problem and 100% the customers responsibility. and also requiring a signature that confirms the cake/cupcakes met the standards of the customer.

TexasSugar Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 6:10pm
post #4 of 12

I don't think every accident can be blamed on the person that picked up the cake. Some things yes, but I don't think it is fair to give a standard, they screwed up.

With something like a banner it could fall off over time or movement.

I glued a blow to the side of a cake the other day, had paper towels under it to hold it while it dried. Had given it time to dry, moved the paper towels and watched it start falling off. It was just too heavy for what I wanted to do.

What was the icing on the cake? What was the banner made out of? How/where was it attached? How long had the banner been on the cake before pick up?

DSmo Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 6:17pm
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paperfishies

I really don't understand why people call and complain about things that are obviously their fault.




Unfortunately, sometimes it's NOT the customer's fault. I'm not suggesting the OP was at fault here, but sometimes cakers do send out cakes that aren't constructed properly to withstand transportation.

I think this case was handled correctly. It was not a blatant error on the part of the customer or the caker, so giving the customer a small compensation is appropriate.

cakesmith_duane Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 6:20pm
post #6 of 12

You may want to think about having them sign a disclaimer (contract) that states - Once the cake has left our shop and is being handled by someone other then our bakery staff, in the event of a mishap the fault rests upon the person who is transporting/handling the cake.

I have something similar to this statement and I have them print and sign their names. I build my cakes as sturdy as possible, but if something happens you need to CYA.

Just something to think about. Take care - Cakesmith

Paperfishies Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 6:24pm
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesmith_duane

You may want to think about having them sign a disclaimer (contract) that states - Once the cake has left our shop and is being handled by someone other then our bakery staff, in the event of a mishap the fault rests upon the person who is transporting/handling the cake.

I have something similar to this statement and I have them print and sign their names. I build my cakes as sturdy as possible, but if something happens you need to CYA.

Just something to think about. Take care - Cakesmith




Totally agree!

Paperfishies Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 6:24pm
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesmith_duane

You may want to think about having them sign a disclaimer (contract) that states - Once the cake has left our shop and is being handled by someone other then our bakery staff, in the event of a mishap the fault rests upon the person who is transporting/handling the cake.

I have something similar to this statement and I have them print and sign their names. I build my cakes as sturdy as possible, but if something happens you need to CYA.

Just something to think about. Take care - Cakesmith




Totally agree!

AnotherCaker Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 6:31pm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSmo

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paperfishies

I really don't understand why people call and complain about things that are obviously their fault.



Unfortunately, sometimes it's NOT the customer's fault. I'm not suggesting the OP was at fault here, but sometimes cakers do send out cakes that aren't constructed properly to withstand transportation.

I think this case was handled correctly. It was not a blatant error on the part of the customer or the caker, so giving the customer a small compensation is appropriate.




Agree with this way more than the typical "Don't blame the baker" crap that seems to be the norm lately. I've been seeing some things in galleries (off of CC) that make me shudder lately. Pieces of paper towels holding things up, large blobs of fondant supporting tiaras and figurines, dowels propped up on the cake boards holding things on, all in obviously "final product stage", in other words, these were left on the cake when they were either delivered/picked up, and that's how they went into the galleries. Looks like laziness and last minute jobs to me. Make the items in advance, allow time to dry/set/whatever, and attach them properly. It's like, people are jumping into constructing things at the time they need them, instead of making them ahead of time. Just grumbling out loud, don't mind me.

Kaykaymay Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 7:46pm
post #10 of 12

While yes the custumer has to understand that these decorations are sugar and need to be handled with care. You have to be honest and ask yourself if maybe it WAS your fault. Maybe it was a new technique or a new recipe and you were not famillier. Also without at least a picture I don't think we can give any real advice about how you should handle it.

sweettreat101 Posted 11 Jun 2011 , 7:31am
post #11 of 12

I usually give them the plaque and let them put it on the cake when they set it up. If you attached it properly then I wouldn't give a discount or refund. Once it leaves my presence it is no longer my responsibility.

maude Posted 12 Jun 2011 , 11:36pm
post #12 of 12

Thanks for all the responses and suggestions. The banner was gumpaste and attached to fondant cake. Seemed to be secured well, but she said it fell off during transit. It was a clean single break and she was able to fix it and even though I offered, she didn't want any money back. Don't get customers like that very often! icon_smile.gif

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