Layering 14" And Larger

Decorating By kristen81 Updated 11 Jun 2011 , 8:06pm by LindaF144a

kristen81 Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 2:00am
post #1 of 16

How does everyone put the top layer of a 14" or larger onto the filling and bottom layer? I've not had to do this often and tearing or breaking always has happened. Soon I'll need a 18", 14", 10", and 6" for a wedding. Any tips or tricks? I don't think the cake is still warm. I waited several hours.
Thanks!

15 replies
Joan1953 Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 2:03am
post #2 of 16

Hi. I always freeze my large cake layers before stacking them. Makes it so much easier.

Jmlpitbull Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 2:04am
post #3 of 16

Freeze it!

playingwithsugar Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 2:29am
post #4 of 16

with a pizza peel. don't laugh, it works.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

playingwithsugar Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 2:30am
post #5 of 16

with a pizza peel. don't laugh, it works.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

soledad Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 2:30am
post #6 of 16

This is great! icon_surprised.gif I never thought of freezing it! icon_biggrin.gif I have never freeze a cake.
But I will if I get to do another lg cake. Thank you!

dulcearoma Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 2:32am
post #7 of 16

The biggest size I've made was a 14''. I place it on a waxed cake board and slide it off onto the bottom layer. This has always worked for me. I have a side by side fridge/freezer so freezing cakes is not an option for me because they don't fit.

SweetSouthernBakery Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 2:42am
post #8 of 16

I have a cake lifter that works really well. I bought it from wal-mart. Or you could use one of the baking sheets that only has a "lip" on one side so that the cake can slide right off. I just a 14 in and either of these work perfectly.

kearniesue Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 2:42am
post #9 of 16

I always freeze mine - big and small. Makes them more moist, besides being easier to handle.

Karen

KakeMistress Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 3:38am
post #10 of 16

I always use the size cake board I need for that layer to transfer the cake to and from the torted layer, HTH

Coral3 Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 3:53am
post #11 of 16

I use a cake board, or a big glass chopping board I have, or sometimes I have it on the cooling rack and holding both together just flip it real quick onto the cake (the key is to be quick, the more you mess around the more time it has to fall apart on you)

HappyCake10609 Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 10:21am
post #12 of 16

I use a cake board as well just a little bigger than the layer I'm working on.

Sweetwise demonstrates the method with a cookie sheet in this video:

http://www.youtube.com/user/SweetWiseInc?feature=chclk#p/u/46/6oLhbNjMNWM

You can see her lift the cake with the cookie sheet about halfway through and then towards the end she layers the cake icon_smile.gif

LindaF144a Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 1:49pm
post #13 of 16

I vote for the pizza board. In fact I am buying some for my shop. This is after I had a 12 inch fall apart on me. I pieced it back together on the cake, but what a pain. I believe there are also cake boards. I saw them at Michaels. But they do not come in 12 and 14" size. I can still see where the cake would fall apart using it.

Oh, and a cookie sheet would work too. Maybe I'll buy some of those instead. I won't know until I go shopping.

playingwithsugar Posted 10 Jun 2011 , 5:20pm
post #14 of 16

lindaf144a

Get the aluminum pizza peel - it's a lot lighter than the wooden one.

And if your local supply store doesn't carry it, look around online for th16" one; it easily handles a 20 inch diameter round or square. Remember, the larger the paddle on it, the longer the handle. You might have to cut them down.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

kristen81 Posted 11 Jun 2011 , 12:19am
post #15 of 16

Thanks to all! Think I'll trying freezing it first.

LindaF144a Posted 11 Jun 2011 , 8:06pm
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

lindaf144a

Get the aluminum pizza peel - it's a lot lighter than the wooden one.

And if your local supply store doesn't carry it, look around online for th16" one; it easily handles a 20 inch diameter round or square. Remember, the larger the paddle on it, the longer the handle. You might have to cut them down.

Theresa icon_smile.gif




Thanks, I bought one today, an aluminum one. I think I can leave the handle as long as it is and use it to anchor against the length of my arm. I'll have to test it and see, but it looks like it work great.

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