Full Sheet Cake

Decorating By caleyb Updated 9 Jun 2011 , 5:07pm by KASCARLETT

caleyb Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 3:39pm
post #1 of 13

Okay, stupid question time.... I have to make a "full sheet cake" for a graduation (way too much cake for 60 people, isn't it?). At any rate - what size pan do I use? Also, should it be a double layer or single? It is to be half chocolate/half vanilla. This is my first paid cake so I am a bit nervous about it! Any pointers are more than welcome!!!

12 replies
TexasSugar Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 4:30pm
post #2 of 13

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

Personally I would use the above chart and direct them to a cake closer to the size they need, rather than do a huge cake.

I would just do a double layer 11x15. It will give them 74 1x2x4 in slices.

CWR41 Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 4:41pm
post #3 of 13

Yes, a true full sheet serves a lot more than 60 people, but if they want extra cake and they're willing to pay for it, let them know if you can provide it. I doubt a true full sheet pan will fit in your oven, but since they want two flavors, it would work to your benefit to bake two 12x18 half sheet cakes--one of each flavor. You can push them together and ice as one single-layer cake (cut 2"x2"x2" servings to feed 10icon_cool.gif, or stack them and ice as one double-layer cake (cut 1"x2"x4" servings to feed 10icon_cool.gif.

If they don't really need 108 servings, an option to suggest would be a double-layer 11x15 1/3 sheet cake to serve 74.

cakegirl1973 Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 4:53pm
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar



Personally I would use the above chart and direct them to a cake closer to the size they need, rather than do a huge cake.

I would just do a double layer 11x15. It will give them 74 1x2x4 in slices.




I agree with texassugar.

indydebi Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 4:56pm
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by caleyb

Okay, stupid question time.... I have to make a "full sheet cake" for a graduation (way too much cake for 60 people, isn't it?).


this is why I refuse to use the terms "full" or "half" in reference to single layer rectangle cakes.

My favorite story is the guy who asked for a price for a "full sheet cake" (which serves 100, by the way). I asked him how many people he needed to feed. he said, "Ten." icon_eek.gif

I said, "Then why do you want to buy 100 servings of cake?" icon_confused.gif

Cake civilians, in general, have no idea what size a full or half sheet is. they just "use the lingo".

If 60 is the max number they are expecting, I agree with Texas about doing a 2-layer 11x15 that will serve 70-75.

cairocats Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 7:23pm
post #6 of 13

exactly what size is 1/2 sheet cake, full sheet, 1/4 sheet cake? I have no idea?

bonton Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 7:31pm
post #7 of 13

I just want to know how does a double layer cake increase the servings?
This has puzzled me for a long time.
Thanks
Bonton

crisseyann Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 7:36pm
post #8 of 13

A double layered cake yields more servings because it is twice as high as a single layer (twice as much cake per slice) so you will be cutting smaller slices than with a single layer cake.. Makes sense?

indydebi Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 7:38pm
post #9 of 13

bonton, because you have double the amount of cake.

What you have to think about is that you cut a 2-layer different than you cut a single-layer.

A single layer cake (which is 2" tall) is cut in 2x2x2" squares (8 cubic inches). A 2-layer cake (which is 4" tall) is cut in 1x2x4" rectangles (8 cubic inches).

If you cut the 2 layer the same way you cut the one layer, you'd have a 2x2x4" piece of cake .... 16 cubic inches .... twice the amount of cake per serving.

Many people hear the words "one inch" and think "paper thin". It's not. Here are pics of a 1x2x4" piece of cake to show that it's a nice dessert size piece of cake: http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1156785

KASCARLETT Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 7:59pm
post #10 of 13

This is my opinion of it: Lots of people will tell me, just a sheet cake and they are talking about a regular sheet cake, not necessarily the size. I just ask how many they need to feed and go from there! lol I think a full-size sheet cake at Walmart or Sams does feed about 60 or so, so they may be thinking that's what they need.

Sheet cake sizes vary from person to person or from stores. To me a full size would be (2) 12x18s put side by side; half sheet -(1) 12x18; 1/3 sheet 11x15 and 1/4 sheet 9x13.

caleyb Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 8:03pm
post #11 of 13

thanks everyone!

Do you "typically" do your "sheet cakes" (regardless of size) as double layer or single layer? When I have baked single layer cakes for my family in the past they always look so "short". I just don't know what the "norm" is.

indydebi Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 8:39pm
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by KASCARLETT

This is my opinion of it: Lots of people will tell me, just a sheet cake and they are talking about a regular sheet cake, not necessarily the size. I just ask how many they need to feed and go from there! lol I think a full-size sheet cake at Walmart or Sams does feed about 60 or so, so they may be thinking that's what they need.

Sheet cake sizes vary from person to person or from stores. To me a full size would be (2) 12x18s put side by side; half sheet -(1) 12x18; 1/3 sheet 11x15 and 1/4 sheet 9x13.


Your cake sizes listed are right on.

To add to this confusion, I have noticed that grocery store bakeries are downsizing their cakes. Just like a half gallon of ice cream is now 1.75 quarts and laundry soap keeps getting smaller (at the same price!), the "half sheets" that should be 12x18, are now 11x15.

So if I were to sell a 'half sheet' at $75, but the local grocery sells a 'half sheet' for $50, the client would be shocked that my 'half sheet' was so much more expensive. but they would be comparing apples to grapes.

KASCARLETT Posted 9 Jun 2011 , 5:07pm
post #13 of 13

I usually just do a single layer and fill the pan a little fuller than normal (if I can), just to make the cake taller (I think it just looks better when the cake is a little taller). I have done the 2-layer sheet cake before, but it really depends on how much the customer needs. It's really your preference. You can always make one layer and torte it if you want it to look a little taller.

indy - I know! It's it crazy! I have even noticed that cokes are now selling a smaller bottle (not sure of the size) vs the 2 liters for 99 cents and they are selling like hot cakes! Do people not realize that although the price is cheap, you have to buy MORE to get what you were getting before, so in all actuality you are paying more? Advertisers are getting more and more sneaky! It's amazing how many people just look at the prices and not compare quantity! And there are so many more things in the grocery store that are going to that strategy, but I'm not "buying" it! I'm a bargain shopper! lol

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