Home Made Modelling Chocolate Uk

Decorating By sanmarco5 Updated 11 Jun 2011 , 6:17am by Coral3

sanmarco5 Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 7:37am
post #1 of 18

Hiya
I want to make some modelling chocolate for a cake i am making, and wondered if anyone in UK can tell me if we have a substitute for corn syrup?
Thanks

17 replies
livlou Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 8:34am
post #2 of 18

liquid glucose icon_smile.gif

LisaPeps Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 9:11am
post #3 of 18

Yes liquid glucose as PP said, or you can buy the American brand corn syrup off amazon.co.uk

Noobz Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 9:13am
post #4 of 18

Just to add liquid glucose is readily available in the large supermarkets with all the baking stuff thumbs_up.gif

mcaulir Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 9:26am
post #5 of 18

I have the same question - corn syrup and glucose aren't the same consistency.

Any ideas on the ratio for chocolate to glucose?

Noobz Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 10:23am
post #6 of 18

I've never seen corn syrup in real life but I use the same ratio as the recipes that use corn syrup and its always worked.

idontknow Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 10:42am
post #7 of 18

I ordered Karo's corn syrup from Waitrose online, so basically Ocado, I'm not sure if Waitrose actually stock it in store, they probably do in bigger ones.

What recipe are you using for modelling chocolate, I'd like to try it, let us know how it works out. icon_biggrin.gif

mcaulir Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 10:43am
post #8 of 18

Thanks! I've actually been experimenting this week, and it always seems to come together into a really hard lump that crumbles rather than it being a kneading consistency. Is this right? Does it just need to be heated slightly? I'm using cooking chocolate - maybe I need to splash out on the expensive stuff!

Reimagining_Confections Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 10:45am
post #9 of 18

You can sub them one for one. Not much difference in consistency.

In cooking terms, corn syrup in Europe is very often referred to as glucose. But it is not pure glucose; it also contains a fair bit of another, more complex, sugar, dextrin. Also, in that corn is largely an American crop, corn syrup has not been widely available in Europe. So European cookbooks are really calling for pure glucose, which has probably been processed from grapes or honey.

Pure liquid glucose is available in supermarkets in Europe, but is harder to find in the US.I don't think anyone will notice a little extra dextrin?

Noobz Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 11:03am
post #10 of 18

This is the recipe I use:

100g dark chocolate (70% cocoa solids)
29g of glucose syrup

This was for the dark chocolate modelling chocolate, for milk it didn't work, I think my ratios were off rather than the chocolate because I just used to cheap stuff for all the recipes.

I'm not an expert but I think you need to use less glucose syrup with white/milk.

sanmarco5 Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 9:30pm
post #11 of 18

Thanks

hollyml Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 9:37pm
post #12 of 18

I thought the usual UK sub for American corn syrup is Lyle's golden syrup. I have no idea whether or how it would work for modeling chocolate but it seems worth a try.

If your chocolate is crumbly it usually means you need more syrup. Just knead it in.

Holly

LisaPeps Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 9:48pm
post #13 of 18

I wouldn't use Golden Syrup, it would discolour it and add a nasty (IMO icon_razz.gif) taste to it. Also I'm not sure what it would do chemically speaking.

I find that cost wise, the corn syrup is a better option as the glucose you find in the supermarkets comes in tiny little tubes or tubs and is quite expensive. Does anyone know where else you can get it from?

Davwattie Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 9:57pm
post #14 of 18

I got my light corn syrup from here

http://www.americansweets.co.uk/karo-light-corn-syrup-16fl-470ml-476-p.asp

Used it to make some sugar coral on my dolphin cake thumbs_up.gif

mcaulir Posted 9 Jun 2011 , 9:33pm
post #15 of 18

Thanks! Will give it another go.

auzzi Posted 11 Jun 2011 , 4:53am
post #16 of 18

Liquid glucose is more viscous than american corn syrup.

A common moulding chocolate recipe is: Dark Chocolate Plastique
1.25kg dark chocolate (55% max cocoa solids)
1kg glucose syrup
Melt the chocolate in a microwave or place it in a clean, heat-resistant bowl over a pan of simmering water. Heat to 43oC. Heat the glucose syrup separately to the same temperature. Pour the syrup into the melted chocolate and sir with a wooden spoon until thoroughly combined. Allow to cool.
Transfer the mixture into a large clean freezer bag and leave overnight at room temperature to set. To use, peel away the bag and knead the chocolate until smooth and pliable, then roll out on a work surface lightly dusted with icing sugar.
This paste is quite firm and chewy. Use this recipe for making hand-moulded roses, lilies and other decorations.
Mix it 1:1 with white RTR for covering cakes.

Other suggested proportions: 180g chocolate with 140g liquid glucose

mcaulir Posted 11 Jun 2011 , 5:08am
post #17 of 18

Ahh, so the ratios are almost 1:1. Thanks for that. Much appreciated!

Coral3 Posted 11 Jun 2011 , 6:17am
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcaulir

Thanks! I've actually been experimenting this week, and it always seems to come together into a really hard lump that crumbles rather than it being a kneading consistency. Is this right? Does it just need to be heated slightly? I'm using cooking chocolate - maybe I need to splash out on the expensive stuff!




I made a batch recently that turned out very crumbly, I kneaded in corn syrup until it got to a workable consistency, then it was fine.

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