Decorating Ideas

Decorating By Neen22 Updated 21 Jun 2011 , 11:10pm by shanter

Neen22 Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 10:04pm
post #1 of 14

I am getting ready to make 4 small round cakes for my aunts 50th birthday party. The party is German Themed. Any ideas of how I could decorate these acourding to theme???

13 replies
Bri122005 Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 10:14pm
post #2 of 14

Big mugs of beer.

Neen22 Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 7:33pm
post #3 of 14

Here is the tricky part for the German cakes. while it is a german theme...... they do not want any alcohol.......

nanikins Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 8:00pm
post #4 of 14

German flag, Volkswagen logo, Albert Einstein was German-born, BMW, Grimm fairy tales were of German origin, sausages and sauerkraut, Bavarian pretzels...HTH some in getting your creative juices flowing.

Good luck!

ame120103 Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 8:08pm
post #5 of 14

One of them could be the traditional alpine hat, another could be the flag, you could do something made to look like the bust area of a dirndl or laderhosen....german chocolate cake would be simple but a obvious idea. I'm in Germany right now so just trying to think of all the typical stuff I see everyday. Black forest and the cookoo clocks are huge here too.

shanter Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 8:21pm
post #6 of 14

On one of the cakes you could pipe or write somehow Happy Anniversary in German: glücklicher Jahrestag (I think that's right--if not, someone please correct me).

shanter Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 8:35pm
post #7 of 14

Black forest: evergreen trees, ladies hat with the red pompons (type "black forest hat" into Google images). Edelweiss. Mercedes symbol. Outline of a map of Germany, maybe showing a city or two--ones of special significance? The Brandenburg gate. Neuschwanstein castle.

I think I'm getting way off track....

Best wishes from Seattle.

shanter Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 9:49pm
post #8 of 14

I can't stop thinking about this. icon_smile.gif
How about making separate German cakes: black forest cherry cake, German chocolate cake, kugelhopf, er ..... is there such a thing as an apple strudel cake? There's probably a German apple cake recipe out there somewhere. Perhaps see this page:
germanfood.about.com/od/baking/tp/cakehub.htm

Moovaughan Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 10:09pm
post #9 of 14

If she is German how about a german plum cake called Zwetschgenkuchen
Traditional German Plum Cake (Zwetschgenkuchen)
Dough:
4 cups all-purpose wheat flour 1 ounce baker's yeast, see note 4 tablespoons sugar 1 cup milk 1/3 cup butter, unsalted and melted 1 eggs 1 pinch salt Filling:
3 1/2 lbs damson plums, see note Topping
4 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Directions:
Sift flour into a large bowl and make a well in the middle.
Crumble yeast into well and mix it with 1 tablespoon of sugar, milk and some flour. This first yeast-mixture should be still fluid. Cover and let rise in warm place for 20 minutes.
Add remaining sugar, melted butter, egg and a good pinch of salt and mix with yeast mixture and flour. Knead with floured hands until dough is peeling away from the side of the bowl and blistering. This step may take 10 minutes (or more). Use some additional flour, if dough is too sticky. At the end you should have a smooth dough.
Cover and let rise in warm place for about 25 to 30 minutes or until dough has doubled.

Page 2 of 2Traditional German Plum Cake (Zwetschgenkuchen) (cont.)
Directions (cont.)
Meanwhile prepare the plums. Cut lengthwise and pit them. Cut the still connected plum halves once again lengthwise, but do not cut through. You should have a depitted plum which you can easily flatten.
Grease backing tray. Dough is calculated for a baking tray of 11 3/4 x 15 inches.
Remove yeast dough from bowl, knead once or twice and roll out on baking tray using a floured rolling pin. Along the sides of the baking tray form a border with yeast dough.
Place plums on yeast dough in closely rows and press slightly into dough. Let rise again for 15 minutes.
Preheat oven (425 F, 220 C).
Bake the plum cake in the middle of the oven for 20 to 25 minutes.
Meanwhile mix sugar and ground cinnamon for topping.
Remove plum cake from oven and sprinkle with sugar-cinnamon mixture. Cut into 20 pieces and serve warm or cold with whipped cream.
NOTE on Baker's yeast: If possible use fresh baker's yeast. But you can replace it by 1 1/2 packages dry yeast.
NOTE on Damson Plums: a traditional German Plum Cake is made with the slightly tart and not too juicy Damson Plums. You can also use other plum varieties, but the plums shouldn't be over-ripped or too juicy. I have tried it with other plum varieties and have reduced amount of sugar in topping.
NOTE on traditional German Plum Cake: in my opinion this cake has to be made with yeast dough. It takes more time to make than other doughs, but it is worthwhile. Don't be afraid of the juices. This cake has to be juicy!
There are existing several names for this type of frutit cake in Germany: Zwetschgenkuchen, Pflaumenkuchen and in Bavaria Zwetschgendatschi. Zwetschgen is the German name for Damson plums.

imagenthatnj Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 10:23pm
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter

I can't stop thinking about this. icon_smile.gif
How about making separate German cakes: black forest cherry cake, German chocolate cake, kugelhopf, er ..... is there such a thing as an apple strudel cake? There's probably a German apple cake recipe out there somewhere. Perhaps see this page:
germanfood.about.com/od/baking/tp/cakehub.htm




German chocolate cake is not German, it's American. Invented by Sam German, an American. I read once that it was called "German's Chocolate Cake" and someone dropped the apostrophe and now we all think it comes from Germany.

all4cake Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 10:27pm
post #11 of 14

der weinerschnitzel(?) ! Is that German?

imagenthatnj Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 10:30pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

der weinerschnitzel(?) ! Is that German?




lol

"Der Wienerschnitzel" is an example of incorrect use of German by native English speakers.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wienerschnitzel

Yummy.

all4cake Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 10:39pm
post #13 of 14

seeeee....all this time, I thought that was THE place to go for authentic German hotdogs and that they were called weinerschnitzels and the name was German for The Hotdog. LOL seriously...

how 'bout bratwurst or sauerbraten.

What if you did (I don't recall what name the technique was given) dimensional buildings (flat but raised-not 3d and not really 2d either) around the sides...maybe with some people in folk garb doing a celebratory dance or other various scenes?

shanter Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 11:10pm
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj

Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter

I can't stop thinking about this. icon_smile.gif
How about making separate German cakes: black forest cherry cake, German chocolate cake, kugelhopf, er ..... is there such a thing as an apple strudel cake? There's probably a German apple cake recipe out there somewhere. Perhaps see this page:
germanfood.about.com/od/baking/tp/cakehub.htm



German chocolate cake is not German, it's American. Invented by Sam German, an American. I read once that it was called "German's Chocolate Cake" and someone dropped the apostrophe and now we all think it comes from Germany.




These forums are sooooo educational!

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