Why Use Jellyroll Pans Instead Of Cake Pans?

Baking By angiev77 Updated 8 Jun 2011 , 1:46am by all4cake

angiev77 Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 7:10pm
post #1 of 11

Does anyone know why some cake decorators use jelly roll pans for square and rectangle cakes but use regular cake pans for round cakes? It seems like the square and rectangle cakes are torted more this way since the jellyroll pans make very thin layers. Also, what are the baking differences on jellyroll pans?

10 replies
katnmouse Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 7:28pm
post #2 of 11

I'm completely guessing here but I'd say it is because it is much quicker and easier to simply cut a 1 inch high jelly roll cake into squares to stack rather than taking the time and effort to torte cake layers to get a 1 inch layer. It also would be less fuss and muss to prepare and clean up one jelly roll pan as opposed to multiple square pans.

cake_architect Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 7:56pm
post #3 of 11

also, on an old cake boss episode i overheard them saying in the kitchen that one sheet (which are baked in the jelly roll pans) only took 28 minutes in there oven- pretty quick if you ask me

imagenthatnj Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 8:30pm
post #4 of 11

Some bakeries even use sheet pans to make round cakes. They take a lot less time in the ovens. In some cake shows you can see how they cut the rounds with the rings and even how they assemble them inside that ring.

Like this, but of course, not with a pan, but with a real pastry ring.

http://www.cakejournal.com/archives/cake-tins

I've done that, with this pastry ring.

http://www.pastrychef.com/ADJUSTABLE-CAKE-RING_p_1185.html

cakeyouverymuch Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 10:10pm
post #5 of 11

When I did this cake (only the dock is cake) I used 9x15 jelly roll pans. I baked a total of 12 layers, but I only needed 10. When I put it together I stacked the first, third and fifth layers using two 9x15s side by side to make a 15x18. For the second and fourth layer I cut one caike in half, centered the whole one and filled the sides with the two halves. That way I didn't have to tort, the interlocking layers held the whole thing together, and I had a good solid surface to apply buttercream and fondant. If I'd had to tort a single cake that size, I would have made a mess of it for sure.

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/2050053

I've also baked round layers of less than an inch when I want a torted effect without actually doing the work. It's especially useful with larger cakes like this one that used three 14 inch layers each one inch thick:

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1949660

I also use the jelly roll pans when I'm going for this effect:

http://lamaisondesgateaux.blogspot.com/2010/12/et-maintenant-quelque-chose-differente.html

shanter Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 10:36pm
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Quote:


I also use the jelly roll pans when I'm going for this effect:

http://lamaisondesgateaux.blogspot.com/2010/12/et-maintenant-quelque-chose-differente.html




Wow. I understand layer upon layer with filling, but then what? Do you start with squares? When you stand it up so the layers are vertical, does it stay that way until you get the fondant on? How do you create the drum shape? By carving?

Curious in Seattle.

cakeyouverymuch Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 11:45pm
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter

Quote:
Quote:


I also use the jelly roll pans when I'm going for this effect:

http://lamaisondesgateaux.blogspot.com/2010/12/et-maintenant-quelque-chose-differente.html



Wow. I understand layer upon layer with filling, but then what? Do you start with squares? When you stand it up so the layers are vertical, does it stay that way until you get the fondant on? How do you create the drum shape? By carving?

Curious in Seattle.




No, i don't stack them layer on layer. When the cake comes out of the oven, I cut them in two lengthwise, so I have two pieces about 4.5 inches by 15 inches. I roll them up on the short side without filling as if I was making a jelly roll and chill them. Then I unroll them, fill them and re-roll the first one. When I come to the end of the first one, I continue with the secnd one, and a third and a fourth (my vanilla cake recipe makes two 9x15 pans). When all the cake is rolled, I roll the whole in plastic, stand it on end and chill it again. Once it is cold, I level it, crumb coat it, and proceed as I would with any other cake. The one I have on my blog is not the best example because there is not enough of a color difference between the filling and the cake. I will say, however, that I got much sharper edges on my fondant than I ever have with a conventional stack of cake layers. It's time consuming, but well worth it. I would not, however, use it for a tiered cake because I don't know how well it would take to a support system. . . .hmmmm. . . ..time to experiment.

shanter Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 12:43am
post #9 of 11

That's amazing! Thanks so much for the info. I may try this. icon_smile.gif
Shanter

all4cake Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 1:46am
post #11 of 11

Also, sheet pans store easier/take up less space and are usually kept in higher quantities due to their usage for other things...If one already has dozens of sheet pans, why not use them for as many things as possible including layer cakes, yes?

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