Push Down Leveling

Decorating By chrisviz Updated 7 Jun 2011 , 8:07pm by sebrina

chrisviz Posted 5 Jun 2011 , 8:51pm
post #1 of 10

Seeing how many people do the "push-down" levelling method on a survey forum post leads me to a question. Whenever I over fill my pans to have the cake rise above the top, the top edges get a bit crusty... how does it work/taste if you push that down into the cake?

Thanks for any imput!

9 replies
labmom Posted 6 Jun 2011 , 4:11am
post #2 of 10

I don't normaly do the push down method. Unless I have a filling or worried about a bulge in the cake. I still level the cake as best I can without using those horrible wilton things. I have the professional abgay (spelling) one at the shop that we closed but It was one of the things that my partner who started the business wanted when we closed it.

I can have everything else in the shop but she won't give up that leveler...

I just don't trust the push down method....I keep my level on the back splash of my counter.

scp1127 Posted 6 Jun 2011 , 4:45am
post #3 of 10

I agree labmom. I try to get my cakes level during baking with proper prep. Then I cut what I need. I've never had this happen because I read this here... if your cake is not level and you turn it upside down as a layer, the middle will push the icing out causing a buldge.

I do level every layer with a cake board as I fill. I push to level, but it is so slight.

chrisviz Posted 6 Jun 2011 , 8:24pm
post #4 of 10

Thanks everyone... btw... my husband just made me a "home-made" version of an Agbay...did a trial run on a test cake...seems to work pretty good.. but the real test will be in a couple days when I start putting together a three tier cake I am making a friend. Fingers crossed! icon_smile.gif

kakeladi Posted 6 Jun 2011 , 8:55pm
post #5 of 10

Noone really gave you the exact way to do this method.
When a cake comes out of the oven, put something flat like a cookie sheet on top of the cake while it is still in the pan and push down on the sheet. Sone use a clean kitchen cloth/towel but the sheet workes better.

But my method is even better icon_smile.gif Learning exactly how much batter is needed in each pan and baking at lower temps yields a moist, almost perfectly flat cake that doesn't need any 'fine tuning' icon_smile.gif
I have done this for more than 30 yrs. Sometimes I use wet wraps (baking strips) sometimes not.
I don't have 'cake scraps' because I don't have to level my cakes. I'm not saying it is *perfect!* each and every time, but more than 99.5% icon_smile.gif

chrisviz Posted 6 Jun 2011 , 9:00pm
post #6 of 10

Thanks Kakeladi! Maybe I will give it a try for giggles. I try to bake lower too, but I havent master the art of the right amount of batter consistantly. icon_smile.gif

Thanks for the help!

lulu53 Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 3:06am
post #7 of 10

I agree with kakeladi!!! ( : I struggled and struggled w/ getting the cakes level..........whether it was a serrated knife, Wilton cake leveler or dental floss. I just couldn't get them level. And, then I read about baking your cakes at a lower temp.......in my case I bake ALL my cakes in every size @ 300 degrees. It may not be perfectly level every single time. But, I can say they are 9 out of 10 times. And, when they're not, it's just a little bubble on top and much much easier to cut straight off than before.

I usually do a 3 layer w/ 2 layers of filling. I like them to be at least 4 inches tall finished. So, I now make 3 cakes from my batter and fill the pan approx. 1/3 full.....bake at 300 degrees and I have 3 perfectly flat layers with no torting!

Hope this might help.....good luck! ( :

chrisviz Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 7:31pm
post #8 of 10

Thanks lulu53.. I have never baked mine as low as 300...just 325... I will try that next time. Thanks for all your help! icon_smile.gif

cherrycakes Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 7:44pm
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisviz

Thanks Kakeladi! Maybe I will give it a try for giggles. I try to bake lower too, but I havent master the art of the right amount of batter consistantly. icon_smile.gif

Thanks for the help!




I use a digital scale and weigh my cake batter. I pour it directly into the pan so it's very clean and gives me the exact amount of batter in each pan. I figured out how much a cup of batter weighs and then go by the Wilton chart for amounts.

sebrina Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 8:07pm
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisviz

Thanks everyone... btw... my husband just made me a "home-made" version of an Agbay...did a trial run on a test cake...seems to work pretty good.. but the real test will be in a couple days when I start putting together a three tier cake I am making a friend. Fingers crossed! icon_smile.gif




OMGsh! Would you please share how he did it?

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