Realistic Wedding Cake Cutting Guides/serving Sizes

Decorating By klallen21 Updated 22 May 2014 , 12:55am by MimiFix

klallen21 Posted 3 Jun 2011 , 3:17am
post #1 of 21

Hi everyone,

I've been on Wilton's site for cake cutting guides and serving sizes, but I've never been to a wedding (or cut a cake myself) with such small pieces. Does anyone know where a more realistic guide is?

I'm trying to make a cake for around 250-300 and wondering if 9-12-15 would be big enough (6 inch on top for bride and groom) and there will be a grooms cake as well.

Any advice is much appreciated!
Thanks!

20 replies
indydebi Posted 3 Jun 2011 , 3:42am
post #2 of 21

define "realistic"? icon_confused.gif

A 1x2x4 is the standard size piece of wedding/dessert cake. It's about the size of folded over peanut butter sandwich. I've cut my personal cakes (birthdays, holidays, family get togethers) this size and it's perfect for all.

no, it's not the huge, honkin' wedge of cake we slap on a plate and chow down on while watching tv, but it's not intended to be. icon_lol.gif A piece of cake after a nice dinner at a wedding is not suppose to be a meal. It's a piece of dessert.

How to cut a cake into these sizes is shown in my signature link below.

Here are pics of cut pieces of cake so you can get an idea of the "realistic" size: http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1156785

klallen21 Posted 3 Jun 2011 , 3:56am
post #3 of 21

Thank you for your reply and the picture...it's very helpful.

I'm not really sure how to define "realistic" other than not a dainty little piece and not a honkin' piece, but right in the middle. I just don't see how to get 24 servings out of an 8 in. round cake or 32 servings out of a 9 in. round cake, which is what Wilton suggests. I'm sure the math adds up to get that many...I just imagine those being tiny little pieces, I guess.

leah_s Posted 3 Jun 2011 , 4:00am
post #4 of 21

It really is a fine portion of cake. And it what EVERY caterer cuts to, so if your cake is being served at a venue you might as well plan on those sizes. It's easy to get 24 servings from an 8" cake.

That said, a 6/9/12/15 using all four tiers serves 185.

Your client needs to pick a number. You can't make a cake for 250-300.

CWR41 Posted 3 Jun 2011 , 4:02am
post #5 of 21

Using this chart,
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm
I figure it will only serve 177, so unless the groom's cake will serve the other 123 people--it won't serve enough.

(not including the 6", of course.)

indydebi Posted 3 Jun 2011 , 4:05am
post #6 of 21

it is hard to visualize getting 24 pieces from a cake that we normally cut into 8 wedges at home, but it's done easily. Really. Most venues cut cakes into the 1x2x4 size.

who is going to be cutting the cake? family? you? caterer? Many have told me they print out my 'how to cut a wedding cake' and leave it on the wedding cake table as a 'how-to' for the cake cutter.

I actually get about 10% more pieces when cutting the cake this way (I get 40-42 pcs from a 10" round, which is suppose to serve 38 ) and I STILL get people asking me for to cut them "a smaller piece, please!"

Many folks hear "one inch" and they think "paper thin". This is not the case at all, as you can see by the pic posted above. thumbs_up.gif

LilaLoa Posted 3 Jun 2011 , 4:08am
post #7 of 21

I think a lot of confusion comes from the HEIGHT of the cake. If you are making cakes that are only 2 inches high...then there is no way you will get that many servings out of them. But if you make them the standard 4" high, that's plenty of cake.

klallen21 Posted 3 Jun 2011 , 4:12am
post #8 of 21

Awesome, awesome...ok...I'm understanding! Thank you icon_smile.gif

lilmissbakesalot Posted 3 Jun 2011 , 6:07am
post #9 of 21

Absolutely... Wilton wedding chart is by far the best serving chart. It allows for a nice piece of cake and you as the baker will get the most bang for your buck.

I use the wedding chart for all cakes and have never once had a client come back and say that they ran out of cake. I give them an illustraction of how to cut their cake (like Debi's method) and more often than not I have people saying they had leftovers.

It can take some time to get used to not thinking a slice needs to be on the larger side... especially for weddings.

Chonte Posted 3 Jun 2011 , 6:37am
post #10 of 21

someone posted this on another thread but it may help you. it's a cake calculator. u select all the pans you are using and it will tell you how many servings it will be. you can play around with it and find the configuration you want HTH!

klallen21 Posted 4 Jun 2011 , 2:01am
post #11 of 21

I appreciate all of the responses. Thank you!!!

katecupcake Posted 3 Apr 2014 , 6:43pm
post #12 of 21

Hi,

 

I'm probably a little late on this post but I'd recommend using the slicer calculator/app on www.bakingit.com. You can put in your cake and it will show you how to slice it and how many slices you will get. This site is brilliant and I'm using it all the time now when I bake. Hope this helps you for future baking projects. 

MamaWa Posted 21 May 2014 , 8:41pm
post #13 of 21

Katecupcake,  thank you for your response!  the calculators on www.bakingit.com looks really good!!!

howsweet Posted 21 May 2014 , 10:39pm
post #14 of 21

Quote:

Originally Posted by katecupcake 
 

Hi,

 

I'm probably a little late on this post but I'd recommend using the slicer calculator/app on www.bakingit.com. You can put in your cake and it will show you how to slice it and how many slices you will get. This site is brilliant and I'm using it all the time now when I bake. Hope this helps you for future baking projects. 

I'm pretty sure I learned all the necessary math in junior high school. And Katie, it looks like you're 3 about years late. And all but one of your previous 6 posts contained a link to that site.

AZCouture Posted 21 May 2014 , 10:46pm
post #15 of 21

Quote:

Originally Posted by howsweet 
 

I'm pretty sure I learned all the necessary math in junior high school. And Katie, it looks like you're 3 about years late. And all but one of your previous 6 posts contained a link to that site.

:detective::lol:

howsweet Posted 21 May 2014 , 10:51pm
post #16 of 21

:lol:

 

I which I could learn to type -- three about?

AZCouture Posted 21 May 2014 , 11:55pm
post #17 of 21

Eh, I gave up on caring much about minor typos awhile ago. I go over correspondence with clients with a red pen, and give my self a break when chatting on forums. I understood what ya meant. 

as you wish Posted 22 May 2014 , 12:00am
post #18 of 21

AHaha! Howsweet, I had to read you post over three times looking for the error before I saw it!

MimiFix Posted 22 May 2014 , 12:20am
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by katecupcake 
 

Hi,

 

I'm probably a little late on this post but I'd recommend using the slicer calculator/app on www.bakingit.com. You can put in your cake and it will show you how to slice it and how many slices you will get. This site is brilliant and I'm using it all the time now when I bake. Hope this helps you for future baking projects. 

I'm pretty sure I learned all the necessary math in junior high school. And Katie, it looks like you're 3 about years late. And all but one of your previous 6 posts contained a link to that site.

 

I flagged all of her posts several weeks ago. My job here is DONE. 

AZCouture Posted 22 May 2014 , 12:27am
post #20 of 21

Good! That spammy stuff is obnoxious. I love how they try to act all non chalant about it too. "Oh, I just happened to come across this, have you ever heard of this miracle product?" Pfffffft.:roll:

MimiFix Posted 22 May 2014 , 12:55am
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 
 

Good! That spammy stuff is obnoxious.  

 

However, spam from katecupcake has not been removed.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

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