Fat Daddio Mad Dadder Pans Review And Warning!!!

Decorating By BGchef Updated 13 Feb 2015 , 12:25pm by EdieBabe

Jeff_Arnett Posted 21 Jun 2011 , 12:40am
post #31 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Samar523

Considering I got no replies to my earlier post asking how these pans are, I guess I'm the only one on cake central who was stupid enough to buy these. .


No...I also bought two...I HATE THEM!!! In fact, I don't like any of their pans.....my cakes come out way to dark in them! I will stick to Magic Line!

ozgirl42 Posted 23 Jun 2011 , 11:27pm
post #32 of 66

I haven't got got the mad dadder pans, but I have a full set of round and square tins and wouldn't use anything else! Logic would dictate that if you are baking a bigger and deeper cake (even though there is a deep and shallow side to these pans) that you would need to use either a heating core or flower nail or baking strips, surely?

Sorelle Posted 23 Jun 2011 , 11:40pm
post #33 of 66

I don't have these but I do have a similar problem with the paisley or teardrop pan, I solved it by putting a damp cloth for a cake strip on the smaller side only.

warchild Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 12:52am
post #34 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj

For anyone interested, there's Ateco heating cores in a package of 4. They look like the flower nails, but are thicker.

http://www.pastrychef.com/HEATING-CORES_p_1992.html#

I don't have the pans, and I don't use flower nails, but I just came across these and thought I'd share.




How funny! So many of us use flower nails, we recommend flower nails to other cakers all the time, but not one of us thought of sawing off the points & marketing them as heating cores! icon_rolleyes.gif

labmom Posted 24 Jun 2011 , 2:49am
post #35 of 66

Hi,
I couldn't figure these pans out either. And I just dont understand how they would work. Anyway, you can always list them on ebay, this reaches people all over the world also. You can be honest that your not going to use them anymore and maybe that your not happy with them someone will bid on them, I even got rid of one of the wilton levelers.
At least you might get some of your money back.

I too only purchase magic line pans. They are so good.

chrissycorrado Posted 7 Aug 2012 , 1:49am
post #36 of 66

I just found this link to instructions from fat daddios. They must have heard you guys. http://www.fatdaddios.com/userfiles/faq/Mad_Dadder_Baking_Instructions.pdf

DeniseNH Posted 7 Aug 2012 , 3:08am
post #37 of 66

Could this be why they're always on "sale".

chrissycorrado Posted 9 Aug 2012 , 2:28am
post #38 of 66

I just tried out the 8" round mad dadder pan. I used two flower nails in the deep end with 7 cups of batter and my cake rose so much that it buried the nails!!! Now I have to dig down into my cake and find the nails!! I placed the nails point side down with the flat top resting on the top of the batter. Did I do something wrong? Did this happen to anyone else?

sgalvan62 Posted 9 Aug 2012 , 2:53am
post #39 of 66

oh no i bought these pans too! oh well gonna give it a try on my bday next week( so if it doesnt work , no problem). but i was wondering can you put a filling in these? also those of you have used them do you recommend making a another cake to give them hieght?

BabyGerald Posted 9 Aug 2012 , 11:53am
post #40 of 66

These worked great for me. I used a super moist pound cake recipe and baked at 325. No flower nails or heating core. Largest size was 12".

Sorry it didn't work out for OP!

lkern777 Posted 9 Aug 2012 , 1:59pm
post #41 of 66

I read the instructions from Fat Daddio and it makes no sense to me to put the flower nails with the point-side down. I always put my flower nails flat side down with the point up. The picture of the flower nails in the link that someone posted above shows them flat side down. Does anyone else use flat side up?

chrissycorrado Posted 9 Aug 2012 , 11:46pm
post #42 of 66

I just tried the 10" round pan and this time I put the flower nails in the deep end with the nail head on the bottom of the pan and the point pointing up. It worked so much better! It baked for 70 minutes. I am happy with how it turned out.

jgifford Posted 10 Aug 2012 , 1:00am
post #43 of 66

I haven't tried these pans, and I won't. I haven't been happy with any of Duff's products. I did try his black fondant, but it looks and feels like plastic. You would think that his products would be a little more impressive. icon_confused.gif

sgalvan62 Posted 11 Aug 2012 , 6:38am
post #44 of 66

Could somebody tell me how to torte and fill a fat daddio's pan properly?

Pyro Posted 11 Aug 2012 , 1:19pm
post #45 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkern777

I read the instructions from Fat Daddio and it makes no sense to me to put the flower nails with the point-side down. I always put my flower nails flat side down with the point up. The picture of the flower nails in the link that someone posted above shows them flat side down. Does anyone else use flat side up?





You use them the normal way first ( at the bottom of the pan, with the point up ). Then you put one more on TOP of your batter " floating ", with the point down ( in the batter ). I guess they feel the top of the batter should also send heat down the cake.

GAILEMI Posted 18 Jan 2013 , 8:57pm
post #46 of 66

Are yours the square or round pans - I just tried the 6" round w/a heat coil & it seems to be all right - I baked @ 325 instead of 350 - If yours are square I would be interested in buying them from you.

CraftyCassie Posted 18 Jan 2013 , 9:46pm
post #47 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enchantedcakes 

Maybe you could try putting a heating core on the deep end of the pan and cover the shallow end of the pan.

This was my thought also.  Worth a try. 

yortma Posted 19 Jan 2013 , 12:10am
post #48 of 66

I have the 12", 8" and 6" Fat Daddio Mad datter pans, and I like them.  I used the Ateco flower nail type heat cores, and also the bake even strips.  I also did not fill the pans vey full, relying on addition regular round layers to build up height.  They cooked fine.  The pans are not very Wonky though, and I usually carve the sides in more. 

pstmacary Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 3:59pm
post #49 of 66

I just purchased these. 

 

I have no idea what everyone means by putting aluminum foil, a heating core..smh. I am officially freaking out. 

 

Can anyone show a pic of what they mean by putting a nail flower or aluminum, etc. 

 

Thanks

yortma Posted 24 Jan 2013 , 2:13am
post #52 of 66

I have used flour nails in Fat Daddio’s topsy turvy pans without any problem.  I have the Ateco heat core nails which have flat bottoms and don’t rust, but are similar to flour nails.    To keep the nails in place during baking, cut a parchment circle to fit the bottom of the pan.  Poke holes in the paper where you want the nails to be.  Grease and flour your pan.  Set the nails in the pan, pointed side up of course, and place the parchment paper over the nails, so they poke through the holes.  (I have never bothered to grease the nails).  The parchment holds the nails in place, and after baking when you turn out the cake, they are easily removed as the base is outside of the paper.  

 

 

 

 

400

 

400


Edited by yortma - 12/5/12 at 7:27am
 
 
 
pstmacary Posted 24 Jan 2013 , 4:42pm
post #53 of 66

Thank you thank you @DeliciousDesserts and @yortma. I didn't realize I had a flower nail from a Wilton kit. I am buying parchment paper today and a couple more flower nails. I appreciate everyone's input here. :)

GAILEMI Posted 24 Jan 2013 , 4:49pm
post #54 of 66

thanks soo much - my nails fell over so this is a great solution - My friend baked the 6 & 8" cakes without any heating cores & they came out beautifully...I might try the 10" w/o

Rhondda Posted 21 May 2013 , 4:13am
post #55 of 66

Hi was just looking to see how to use those mad pans and found out that to stop the cakes from cooking unevenly just pop in a nail flower into the deep end of the pan. For the 8" and larger 2 or more. This way they act as a heating core and the cake cooks nicely... as I haven't tried them yet it does make sense to me to use nail flowers. I hope this helped although I won't be making them today I will in the next few weeks and I will use the nail flowers also. I have added the link for the instructions on how to use them. icon_smile.gif

 

fatdaddios.com/userfiles/faq/Mad_Dadder_Baking_Instructions.pdf

199jdehnert Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 2:26am
post #56 of 66

AOk I was a question I am purchasing the 3 tier, how do you stack them. Will the SPS system still work because the rods are all the same length.

199jdehnert Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 2:33am
post #57 of 66

A

Original message sent by BabyGerald

These worked great for me. I used a super moist pound cake recipe and baked at 325. No flower nails or heating core. Largest size was 12".

Sorry it didn't work out for OP!

How did you stack them so they were secure?

yortma Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 3:50am
post #58 of 66

Each cake is sitting on a level surface.  A flat area the same size and shape as the bottom of the next tier up  is carved out so the next tier sits level on the one below it.  The supports, whatever type they may be, are all the same length.  There are good YouTube videos demonstrating the technique.  The cakes are quite stable.  It is an illusion that each one is sitting on a slanted surface.  A center dowel, especially for transport will add extra security.  There is a nice  diagram by FromScratch SF in this CC Discussion:

 

http://cakecentral.com/t/595778/topsy-turvy-cakes

vtanderson Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 6:07am
post #59 of 66

I didn't buy the Mad dadder ones, but the anodized 2 and 4 inch deep squares and circles.  I've never had a problem with those ones, but maybe its a different quality for the Mad Dadder ones?

leah_s Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 10:47am
post #60 of 66

AYes, SPS works fine as long as you understand that the cakes are actually all sitting level.

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