Texas Cottage Laws

Decorating By Encantoscakes Updated 27 May 2011 , 4:34pm by sillywabbitz

Encantoscakes Posted 27 May 2011 , 3:40am
post #1 of 12

Can anybody tell me about the laws in Texas about selling cakes from my home. This is unbelieveble soon nobody can do anything in their homes. It' s not enouhg with the home association icon_surprised.gif

11 replies
jason_kraft Posted 27 May 2011 , 12:58pm
post #2 of 12

You cannot legally sell food made from your home kitchen in TX, you would need to build an additional kitchen on your property that can pass inspection or rent a commercial kitchen. if you want to change the law you can contact your state representatives.

More info:
http://www.texascottagefoodlaw.com/

sillywabbitz Posted 27 May 2011 , 1:20pm
post #3 of 12

Ecantoscakes,
Your timing could NOT be more perfect. The cottage food law for texas will live or die in the next 24 hours. Go to the website Jason mentioned but you need to get on the facebook page where Kelley is updating us all with instructions.

We have a callign campaign right now to Senator Nelson (the cottage food bill is attached as an Amendment to her bill) and to your personal Senator and the President of the Senate. If you would like the numbers to call please PM me. As much as I want the world calling Senator Nelson, I don't feel right posting her number on such a broad forum. Please please please PM me or join the facebook page because this is our last chance for another 2 years.

bakencake Posted 27 May 2011 , 1:21pm
post #4 of 12

From What i hear tx is one of the most strict states to sell food in. Have you thought about maybe renting a restaurant, church or bakery's kitchen?

jason_kraft Posted 27 May 2011 , 2:46pm
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by sillywabbitz

Please please please PM me or join the facebook page because this is our last chance for another 2 years.



Why is it your last chance for 2 years? Bills can be passed any time the state legislature is in session.

sillywabbitz Posted 27 May 2011 , 2:58pm
post #6 of 12

Our state legislation is only in session every two years. In 2009 the cottage food bill died in committee. We've made more progress in the current 2011 session but if the amendment is not approved we don't get another chance until 2013.

TexasSugar Posted 27 May 2011 , 3:00pm
post #7 of 12

According to: http://www.txddc.state.tx.us/public_policy/txlegis.asp

The Texas Legislature meets in a regular session every two years, convening on the second Tuesday in January of every odd-numbered year. These biennial sessions are limited to 140 days. The governor can also call additional special sessions as necessary, which cannot exceed 30 days.

jason_kraft Posted 27 May 2011 , 3:11pm
post #8 of 12

Geez, I wish I could get every other year off from my job. icon_razz.gif

sccandwbfan Posted 27 May 2011 , 3:15pm
post #9 of 12

Is a church legal for selling cakes out of if they aren't monitored by the food dept.?

inspiredbymom Posted 27 May 2011 , 3:24pm
post #10 of 12

From what I have heard about the legislators in TX is that they don't get paid what other legislators get paid either. It is more like they are doing it as community service than a job. Is that correct? The state doesn't have to fork over so much money to have suits sit around and make stuff up to do. They have regular jobs and this is extra. Good luck!

sillywabbitz Posted 27 May 2011 , 3:31pm
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by sccandwbfan

Is a church legal for selling cakes out of if they aren't monitored by the food dept.?




Nope. In Texas, churches can only sell food produced in a church kitchen if it's a commercial kitchen inspected and approved by the health department. Non-profits and bake sales are not exempt from the law but I believe some counties will give you a permit or something to hold a bake sale.

sillywabbitz Posted 27 May 2011 , 4:34pm
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by inspiredbymom

From what I have heard about the legislators in TX is that they don't get paid what other legislators get paid either. It is more like they are doing it as community service than a job. Is that correct? The state doesn't have to fork over so much money to have suits sit around and make stuff up to do. They have regular jobs and this is extra. Good luck!




Hi Inspiredbymom,

I think you are correct. The representatives I have talked with in my area all have 'real' jobs. They seem to be house reps and senators only part time and only once every two years which I guess is what makes this system doable.

Thank you for the good luck vibes. I have every finger and toe crossed on this one. I've never been very political but I'm glued to the senate updates. They even do live feeds while they're in session.

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