Party Servings Vs. Wedding Servings

Decorating By cfpeoples Updated 27 May 2011 , 4:59am by JanH

cfpeoples Posted 25 May 2011 , 1:49pm
post #1 of 34

I have been working from my legal home kitchen for about a year, and when pricing "per serving" i always base it on the serving size for a "party cake" or a serving size for a "weddig cake". Which of course since the party size is bigger than the wedding size, means less proft for me. Is this what everyone does? The funny thing is that most of the time the party cakes are harder to do than the wedding cakes...so doesn't quite seem fair.

33 replies
cai0311 Posted 25 May 2011 , 1:59pm
post #2 of 34

All my cakes are 4" high, so all my servings are based off the wedding serving guide. It became too difficult to worry about both charts and I don't like the look of 2" tall cake so I don't make them.

As a side note, the party serving guide is not a larger serving of cake. The size of the a party serving is 2" x 2" x 2" or 8 square inches of cake. the size of the wedding serving is 1" x 2" x 4" or 8 square inches of cake. Same amount of cake just proportioned differently. I understand what you are saying - yes, you need a larger cake if you go by the party guide but the actual cake serving is the same amount of cake.

LindaF144a Posted 25 May 2011 , 2:06pm
post #3 of 34

Sometimes is up to the customer.

I worked at a cake shop where we said the 8" cake would serve 12-15 people. When customers you to asked me how it could do that I used to tell them it depended on how you sliced it. If you wanted to serve wedges, which most people are used to serving, they would make for very small pieces. In all cases where someone questioned the serving amount, they automatically upgraded to the higher size cake.

IMO, 12 slices in a 8" cake is too small to taste, let alone enjoy. And I had a lot of customers agree with me too. LOL At the most I can see getting a good size in a 8" wedge cut cakes is 8 slices. And that is what I intend on stating for my cakes.

Now if you cut in squares or rectangles like the OP mentioned, it is different. But I found that unless it is a wedding where a professional will be cutting the cake, most people do wedges.

cfpeoples Posted 25 May 2011 , 2:12pm
post #4 of 34

Thanks cai0311. I love your work! I should have clarified. I agree with you...i don't do the 2 inch size either. I was talking about the "wilton party serving size" It is for a 2-inch pans, 2 layer, 4 inches high. It has the party sizes listed as 1 1//2-inch x 2-inches X 4-inches high; as opposed to 1-inch x 2-inch x 4-inches. It seems like such a small difference, but by the time you add an extra 1/2 inch to each piece it adds up. And it seems like i get the short end of the stick since people add some very unique rquests to party cakes!!! Thanks for the advice. I was thinking of going in the direction you said....just the same serving size no matter what the occasion!

leah_s Posted 25 May 2011 , 2:20pm
post #5 of 34

Most professionals price using the wedding chart for everything. I don't care how you cut it, but that's the price. An 8" cake serves 24 and that's how it's priced. You can call it a single serving for all I care.

jules5000 Posted 25 May 2011 , 2:25pm
post #6 of 34

actually unless it has recently been changed in Wilton's books the measurements for the pieces of cake for a wedding is 2" x 1" x4" ok, maybe that one might be 8 cubed ", but the party cake is only 1/2" larger then the wedding cake and yet not really. It is 2" x 1 1/2" by 3-6" so Wilton says vary your cutting size if the cake is less than 3" high. Well I would hope so.

I tell the people that want to order a cake from me and pay for it that these are the sizes of the pieces according to Wilton. Do you want to go by these sizes or bigger? I let them decide and then we decide on the size of the cake and I decide my price on that.

I think, personally that the wedding cake pieces are way too small. Most people that have cake at a reception do go back for more. I realize that there are a lot more people that have to watch their sugar intake now than a few years ago, but let's not be so stingy with the size of the pieces of cake.

So why not make it a more realistic size piece. Like maybe a 2"x2" or a 2" x 3" Now at the Weddings that there is appetizers and a dinner and cake and mints the Wilton size Wedding cake is plenty for most I would say, but if there is just cake, punch, mints and nuts then more than likely you are going to find that people want more than that tiny little slice of cake.

I do not think that that is unreasonable or being gluttoneous. If you figure that there are a lot of people that spend a great deal to travel quite a ways to come to the wedding, they get the bride and groom a nice wedding present and they have to spend money on a motel night or two this is not a cheap thing to do.

To give them a tiny piece of cake at the celebration, which is what the reception is , is to me an insult. Like I said, if you are going to do more than just a cake and punch reception than is another story. I do not know how they came up with that tiny a little piece to begin with , but in my estimation it is way too small.

If the cake is not good it is plenty big, but hopefully that is not the case here. We are talking about a delicous cake here, right? This is just my opinion, but I would like to see how many might agree with me on this issue.

Kristie925 Posted 25 May 2011 , 2:39pm
post #7 of 34

I use Earlene's serving chart! http://www.earlenescakes.com/ckserchart.htm

LindaF144a Posted 25 May 2011 , 2:48pm
post #8 of 34

Leah has a good point.

And I think I worded mine wrong. I did say that I would say 8 servings for a 8" cake, but I will also show the chart that shows the 24 serving size. It is up to the customer to decide if they want to pay the price for that size cake or not. It is from past experience that I know the serving size amount gets questions a lot. That does not mean I'll charge less because it serves 8, the customer just has to decide how they want to cut it to get the size and number they want. If they don't think it will work, then they get to decide if they want a larger cake or not.

I did a sheet cake that I felt would not be enough based on the Wilton chart. I let the customer know what size she would have to cut the slices in order to get the number she wanted. She decided that the size serving would work for her. It must have, because I did not hear that there was not enough cake.

So it does depend on the perception of the customer, and it will vary. I've had customers by a cake large enough to serve 50 slices per the chart for a party of 6. So go figure. It's all good in the end.

Unlimited Posted 25 May 2011 , 2:51pm
post #9 of 34

If you think about it, the prepackaged Hostess and Little Debbie snack cakes are only about four bites (perfect for a snack) and a wedding cake serving is at least eight bites (perfect for a wedding), IMO.

indydebi Posted 25 May 2011 , 6:22pm
post #10 of 34

One of the things to ask at the consultation is if it is a dinner/buffet reception or a cake/punch reception.

if it's just cake/punch, then the bride should be encourages to BUY A BIGGER CAKE since this will be the only food. It is not the baker's responsibility to DONATE more cake just because the bride decides to serve larger pieces.

A can of Campbell's tomato soup says it will serve 2.5 people. Bull. I pour the whole thing in my big coffee mug and drink the whole thing myself. But if I wanted to serve 2 more people, I couldn't call Campbell's and tell them they "owe" me 2 cans of soup simply because we eat like Jethro Bodine.

*IF* a baker chooses to have the 1.5x2x4" as the standard serving size on their cakes, then this must be communicated to the client in a super clear, pound it into their head manner, or I swear to high heaven, there are people out there who will tell their friends: "Baker A's 10" round cake serves 38 but Baker B's 10" round cake only serves 25, so go with Baker A .... you get more cake." icon_confused.gif

Seriously. They will.

TexasSugar Posted 25 May 2011 , 6:34pm
post #11 of 34

I use the wedding sizes for every cake I make. If you do have two separate servings sizes then you should have two separate price per servings. Other wise like you said, you will lose out.

An 8in costs you so much to make in ingredients, labor plus you profit. It doesn't matter if they cut in 20 party servings, 24 wedding servings or two people take a fork to you, you should make the same amount on the cake.

I think it is just easier to stick with one serving size, one (basic) price per serving (less having to explain the difference) and if they want bigger slices, they just need to order more cake.

jules5000 Posted 25 May 2011 , 10:35pm
post #12 of 34

I appreciate your input. I guess that what I was trying to say you figured out even if I took too many words to say it.

I looked at the chart and saw the difference in the amounts of servings that she said she used versus the other #'s, but after looking at a wilton's year book the # of servings per 6" double layer cake(4" deep/tall) is only 12 servings , the chart had the 5" cake serving 20 people. I wonder whose figures the second figures were in her chart. I do not know how you could cut a 5" cake into 20 servings and have more than 1 bite of cake per person

Maybe I read it wrong or am misunderstanding it? Help me here too? Thanks. I still have so much to learn.

Kristie925 Posted 25 May 2011 , 11:06pm
post #13 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by jules5000

I appreciate your input. I guess that what I was trying to say you figured out even if I took too many words to say it.

I looked at the chart and saw the difference in the amounts of servings that she said she used versus the other #'s, but after looking at a wilton's year book the # of servings per 6" double layer cake(4" deep/tall) is only 12 servings , the chart had the 5" cake serving 20 people. I wonder whose figures the second figures were in her chart. I do not know how you could cut a 5" cake into 20 servings and have more than 1 bite of cake per person

Maybe I read it wrong or am misunderstanding it? Help me here too? Thanks. I still have so much to learn.



I assume you're talking about Earlene's chart? If so, she says a 5 inch will serve 6. I think the 20 that you saw referred to something else. Read the headings under the letters A, B, C, E, F, G and H across the top of the chart. Each column lists something different.

kakeladi Posted 25 May 2011 , 11:16pm
post #14 of 34

Every single food item you buy - canned, jared, bottled etc - tells you what a 'serving size' is (usually 1/2Cup) and then tells you how many servings that perticular can will yield. Campbell's soup: 1/2 cup serving size with 'about 2.5 servings' per can. Do you argue with them? Do you try to tell Campbells "OH NO, I eat an entire can of soup in one sitting ( as I sometimes do) therefore it is only one serving and you should only charge me for one serving! ?
Our baking 'industry' has determined the serving size of cake to be 1"x2"x4" OR in the case of sheet cakes or other 2"x2"x2". THIS is what most of us (and *everybody*) should be using. Like LeahS said, who cares if they make 1 or 50 servings out of an 8"x4" cake?? YOU should be pricing it according to the 'industry standard'. If they want to serve larger portions let them buy a bigger cake! Why can't we all agree on this??????

And if you look at any of Wilton's *OLD* books - like back in the 1960s you will see where an 8"x4" round was said to serve 8 'party size' servings. In the late '80s into '90s it became 10-12 and now (I think) it's 15 - all for the same exact size cake!
Yes, back then we were bigger eatersicon_smile.gif That was before it was determined that sugar/sweets were oh soooo bad for us.

jules5000 Posted 26 May 2011 , 1:15am
post #15 of 34

Actually I was mistaken. the 20 was not for servings it was for lace points you would need for that size cake . The servings listed were in Column F of Earlenes chart. and when I went back to find out which Column I found out it said 35. I was again shocked. Who would try to serve 35 people with a 5" double layer cake? No, Earlenes servings did say 6. You are correct about that. But go up to that website that lists her chart and see what I am talking about. I am just curious who set the other standard that is in Column F.

Second issue was the age of the Wilton yearbook. It is the 2009 yearbook on page 113. for a 6" round they want you to feed 12 people. They do not have the odd sizes except for a 15" on a few of them. the rest of the sizes are even. Thank you to whoever might have these answers. icon_smile.gif

LindaF144a Posted 26 May 2011 , 1:24am
post #16 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

Every single food item you buy - canned, jared, bottled etc - tells you what a 'serving size' is (usually 1/2Cup) and then tells you how many servings that perticular can will yield. Campbell's soup: 1/2 cup serving size with 'about 2.5 servings' per can. Do you argue with them? Do you try to tell Campbells "OH NO, I eat an entire can of soup in one sitting ( as I sometimes do) therefore it is only one serving and you should only charge me for one serving! ?
Our baking 'industry' has determined the serving size of cake to be 1"x2"x4" OR in the case of sheet cakes or other 2"x2"x2". THIS is what most of us (and *everybody*) should be using. Like LeahS said, who cares if they make 1 or 50 servings out of an 8"x4" cake?? YOU should be pricing it according to the 'industry standard'. If they want to serve larger portions let them buy a bigger cake! Why can't we all agree on this??????

And if you look at any of Wilton's *OLD* books - like back in the 1960s you will see where an 8"x4" round was said to serve 8 'party size' servings. In the late '80s into '90s it became 10-12 and now (I think) it's 15 - all for the same exact size cake!
Yes, back then we were bigger eatersicon_smile.gif That was before it was determined that sugar/sweets were oh soooo bad for us.




The reason why you see things like 2.5 servings for a can of tomato soup (yeah, right) is so that they can put in a low amount for the calories per serving. They have made it as low as they can to make it sound reasonable so that the calorie count looks good. It is pure marketing, and should not be taken as gospel.

Just like cake servings. I honestly do not understand the per serving charge. I can see where you want to do that for a special order cake like a wedding or something as formal. But for specialty cakes, it is a set price that will serve a range of servings all dependent on how large or how small you cut the cake. That is what I used to tell the customers where I used to work.

An 8" cake should be a set price, regardless of how many it serves. It is not up to us to tell the customer that they have to cut the cake this way at this size to get this number of pieces. Basically telling the customer that you should get 24 servings in an 8" cake is the exact same marketing ploy as the tomato soup makers do. Look you are getting a lot for your money by getting 2.5 servings per can, or look you are getting a lot for your money by having 24 slices. The serving size and amount of servings is a suggestion. If they want bigger slices, which most of the time the customers I dealt could tell that 24 servings in an 8" cake meant small pieces, then they can order a larger cake. You are not obligated to give them a bigger cake at the 8" price to get bigger slices just because they want more cake per slice. I never had a customer balk that they had to order a bigger cake to get bigger cake slices. They just recognized that getting 24 slices meant we were expecting them to cut the pieces smaller than they would, so they almost always ordered a larger cake.

Come to think of it, it is an excellent marketing strategy as I always had a 100% upsell rate just by talking about how big of a slice of cake they can expect to get for the size cake they were thinking of ordering. Interesting.

indydebi Posted 26 May 2011 , 1:26am
post #17 of 34

kakelady, I wonder if the serving size changed with the type of wedding reception thru the years? Way back then, many (dare I say "most"?) receptions were simple cake-n-punch, so the cake was the only food. Therefore it was logical that the pieces of cake were cut bigger.

Over the decades, I've watched receptions move from cake-n-punch to more elaborate ..... adding finger sandwiches and veggie trays, then sandwiches and appetizer meatballs, to buffets, to full plated dinners. I rarely even hear of just a cake-n-punch recepton anymore.

With more food added over the years, the size of the wedding cake slice got a bit smaller.

Sorry....! The soon-to-be history teacher in me is surfacing again! icon_redface.gificon_rolleyes.gif

jules5000 Posted 26 May 2011 , 1:57am
post #18 of 34

Indydebbie, I believe you are right about why the sizes of the pieces changing. and you are right when you suggested that someone ought to ask what kind of reception are you going to have?

My family and I had way more cake left after their party than we could use so we ended up dumping the rest in the trash. if we had been going to be there for another day or two we would probably have tried to keep some of it, but we were also flying home so it was kind of too hard to take any with us. I am not upset that we had to throw some away so much as that I would have loved to been able to give it as a donation to a shelter house. But we had no time to look into it. We had to get home and start packing and be ready to go the next day. I guess the reason I am bringing this up is that I would rather have cake left over and know that everyone had the opportunity to have a great time and eat what they wanted and have a generous piece or two of cake. I would much rather be too generous than stingy and run out of cake at a party. It was my parents 50th and they and their friends deserved to celebrate. But I know that another reason there was a lot left was that we had a barbecue and food at the party as well as cake and punch, mints and nuts. So it is a very good thing to know the facts before making suggestions about what size they might need when you know how many they want to serve. Thanks for listening.

dawncr Posted 26 May 2011 , 2:42am
post #19 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by jules5000

I think, personally that the wedding cake pieces are way too small. Most people that have cake at a reception do go back for more. I realize that there are a lot more people that have to watch their sugar intake now than a few years ago, but let's not be so stingy with the size of the pieces of cake. So why not make it a more realistic size piece. Like maybe a 2"x2" or a 2" x 3" Now at the Weddings that there is appetizers and a dinner and cake and mints the Wilton size Wedding cake is plenty for most I would say, but if there is just cake, punch, mints and nuts then more than likely you are going to find that people want more than that tiny little slice of cake. I do not think that that is unreasonable or being gluttoneous. If you figure that there are a lot of people that spend a great deal to travel quite a ways to come to the wedding, they get the bride and groom a nice wedding present and they have to spend money on a motel night or two this is not a cheap thing to do. To give them a tiny piece of cake at the celebration, which is what the reception is , is to me an insult. Like I said, if you are going to do more than just a cake and punch reception than is another story. I do not know how they came up with that tiny a little piece to begin with , but in my estimation it is way too small. If the cake is not good it is plenty big, but hopefully that is not the case here. We are talking about a delicous cake here, right? This is just m;y opinion, but I would like to see how many might agree with me on this issue.




I appreciate your viewpoint, but I respectfully disagree.

I think the 1" x 2" x 4" standard slice is an appropriate size. If someone desires more that one serving of cake, then I think they should get a second piece. That way, they understand that they're eating two pieces of cake, and aren't deluded into thinking they're only eating one piece.

Our portions in the US have been so super-duper-sized that we don't even recognize what an appropriate serving size is. Our serving plates and bowls have grown as well, so we don't realize just how much we're eating. Why are we killing ourselves with obesity? Other countries don't have quite as big a problem. When was the last time you had a piece of cake in Asia or Europe? I don't think it's a sign of my hospitality to my guests to serve them excessively huge and unhealthy quantities of food.

A 2" x 3" x 4" piece of cake is a grotesquely-large piece of cake (24 sq inches), and likely has as many calories as many persons' daily allowances should be, if they are within a normal weight range. If we tell customers that this is a serving, we'll also need to tell them that our price is $9 per serving (as an example), rather than $3 per serving. Brides may not compare our price with our competition accurately, and go with the baker who seems to offer the better value, even though both are the same price.

I hope we keep the standard 8 sq in serving size. I'm not saying we should try to restrict what people choose to eat, but I believe we shouldn't try to fool them into thinking they're eating less than they are.

Dissenting opinions welcome. icon_wink.gif

Edited to add link:
http://www.fooducate.com/blog/2010/08/31/four-graphic-examples-of-portion-distortion-youll-be-shocked/

JanH Posted 26 May 2011 , 7:08am
post #20 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by jules5000

I think, personally that the wedding cake pieces are way too small. Most people that have cake at a reception do go back for more. I realize that there are a lot more people that have to watch their sugar intake now than a few years ago, but let's not be so stingy with the size of the pieces of cake.




If the cake were the only food item, I could probably eat two whole wedding sized cake slices during the course of the reception. (But only if it's really great cake!) icon_biggrin.gif

But if other food is also served - the wedding size cake serving would be more than adequate to satisfy my dessert cravings. thumbs_up.gif

HTH

TexasSugar Posted 26 May 2011 , 3:19pm
post #21 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawncr


Our portions in the US have been so super-duper-sized that we don't even recognize what an appropriate serving size is. Our serving plates and bowls have grown as well, so we don't realize just how much we're eating.




I have complained more than once about how a medium drink at a fast food place is what was considered a large size not that long ago. We do live in a super sized world that offers to make things even bigger.

Those that said that serving sizes are a suggestion. No one is telling anyone they can't make a 8in cake a serving for two instead of 24. I think the basic idea is you need to pick a serving size that you are comfortable and stick with it.

When I am asked about a cake I list out the cake size as well as how many servings and spell out the serving size. That way they have all the information. If they want bigger pieces they order more cake. No one has come back and told me the cake was too small, or didn't serve enough people.

LindaF144a Posted 26 May 2011 , 3:38pm
post #22 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF1441

I think, personally that the wedding cake pieces are way too small. Most people that have cake at a reception do go back for more. I realize that there are a lot more people that have to watch their sugar intake now than a few years ago, but let's not be so stingy with the size of the pieces of cake.



If the cake were the only food item, I could probably eat two whole wedding sized cake slices during the course of the reception. (But only if it's really great cake!) icon_biggrin.gif

But if other food is also served - the wedding size cake serving would be more than adequate to satisfy my dessert cravings. thumbs_up.gif

HTH




Just for the record, I did not write that quote.

jules5000 Posted 26 May 2011 , 5:21pm
post #23 of 34

dawncr, I agree with you on one point. Most of America's fast food chains supersize everything. or are willing too. Indydebbie is right in saying that the medium drinks now are what the Large used to be. Actually when I think about it I think that there are a lot of places that the medium drink is more what the extra large drink used to be.

However I did a quick drawing of the size that I suggested that a cake size be which was 2" x 2" X 4". It is not a large piece of cake. Even a 2 x3 would not be that large. I believe that you are not doubling the size of cake that they have. You are just making it half again as big as it was in only one measurement(on the 2 x 2 piece) on the cake is larger, but not doubled I believe people, for the most part would just have one piece. I believe that there are several reasons that people go back for seconds at a wedding besides the pieces not being very big. Sometimes it is the time the wedding is at and the reception that soon follows. A lot of times, a wedding starts sometime between lunch and dinner and by the time you have gotten yourself ready for the wedding you are hungry, but you do not want to take a chance on getting your outfit dirty so you just wait. By the time of the reception you are quite hungry. I am quite sure that there are those that would go back for more no matter what size it was, but they are the ones that are more likely the ones that have the problem. I am sure that there are several reasons people go back beside the one I mentioned.
I am sure that that happens a lot becausse it has to me. No you don't necessarily want to eat two pieces of cake, but by the time you get home it is too late to eat(we are assuming this is just a cake and punch reception. If there is food at the reception, it is easy to eat that and then eat just one piece of cake. If you are a person that is out of c ontrol with eating it doesn't matter what it is or how big, but we are talking the average person.

TexasSugar Posted 26 May 2011 , 5:47pm
post #24 of 34

I was the one that stated the thing about the drinks. icon_smile.gif

My question is:

Why is it the bride's/groom's/family's job to feed people until they are full at a reception?

The only time I can see this being important is if it is a sit down dinner type of thing. If you are talking about finger foods and cake and punch, then I don't see how people should be expected to buy bigger pieces of cake, so that everyone that is invited can be stuffed full when they leave.

I'd have the same feeling if I went to a Birthday party. If it is just a snack thing with cake (and scheduled appropriately) then I wouldn't expect to just get to eat my fill of cake. You make plans to eat before you go or after it.

People invited to the wedding are grown adults (with of course the exception of children) and should be smart enough to decide to eat before or after a wedding. If the wedding is scheduled at 3 pm, then isn't it their responsibility to either eat a late lunch or a snack if they know they wouldn't be able to go until 5 o'clock with out eating a 'real' meal? I don't think because of their decision to go to the wedding hungry a bride's father should have to shell out for a huge cake so everyone can have bigger slices of cake.

If I went to a restaurant and ordered a slice of cheese cake and thought their serving size was too small, do you think they would cut it larger for me for the same price? Or do you think they would say, if you want a bigger piece you have to order a second piece, thus paying double for your 'single' serving?

I think if you do decide to go with larger servings, you do need to charge appropriately and you need to make it clean to the customer what the price is and what the size is. Because most people shopping are going to assume that there is a standard and even if your serving size is bigger they may end up just comparing dollar amounts. They may thing well Bakery A's cake is $4 a serving and Bakery B's Cake is $6 a serving, I'm going with the cheaper one, with out considering the size difference.

Vanessa7 Posted 26 May 2011 , 5:57pm
post #25 of 34

When you look at Earlene's chart, column H refers to the total amount of servings based upon the size of cakes used. When figuring cake to serve they do not figure in the top tier because they assume it will be reserved for the year anniversary. Listed with the 5" cake is an 11" cake, which is where they get the 35 servings from. They list a 5" cake as 6 servings. The individual sized cake servings are in column C. HTH

With that being said, I now price according to Wilton's size and let customers know the serving size. Many times they are ok with that or they may choose to get a larger cake. I leave it up to them. That way I am not funding extra cake from my pocket.

jules5000 Posted 26 May 2011 , 6:17pm
post #26 of 34

Indydebby, It is not their responsibility to feed people until they are stuffed. I did not say stuffed. for example I have a wedding that I am going to this weekend. The wedding starts at 4:30. I have to leave the house by 3:30. So if I have a quick lunch before getting ready for the wedding. that would be somewhere around 12-12:30. I am hungry again( I eat small meals 6 times a day) by the time I leave. I can take a small snack with me to the wedding and eat on the way, but then I take a chance on messing up my clothes. Fortunately, this wedding reception is going to have food, and cake. I will only want one piece, even if I could have two because I am trying to not gain. I have my daughter getting married the next weekend and her reception is also going to have food. When this is the case it is not hard. It is just sometimes the timing, Diabetics, which I am not one have to eat every so often and it would be impossible to eat in the middle of the wedding. My mother is one, though. If you have a set schedule of when you eat and your body functions on that schedule it is sometimes hard to get your body to be agreeable to something else especially for just one partial day. sometimes people have different needs that make it hard when the scheduling is off. The Bride schedules the wedding as best she can to what her and her husbands plans are for taking off for a honeymoon and what they want and that is their right, but it does not mean that it is conventient for those they want to come to the wedding. I am sure that there are many brides that consider the timing for their guests as well as themselves when possible. these are the kind of facts that are reality for a lot of people that attend. I know it is not just myself. When there is food at the wedding, no you do not need as big a cake. I know you are a professional and I am not disagreeing with you. I am mainly just stating that there are other factors that come into play with guests at a reception. I do not push bigger pieces, I just inform them that this is the size they are talking about and if ou want a bigger piece than lets make the cake bigger. I always give them the choice.

robinmarie Posted 26 May 2011 , 6:28pm
post #27 of 34

If you are using Earlene's chart, say for 50 people at a wedding, you would use a 11", 8" and a 5". The 5" cake is not considered apart of the 50 servings, but unless you are giving the bride a 5" for free, you still need to add in the 6 additional servings, because the bride and groom will eat the cake at their anniversary or whenever, so they will need to be charged for 55 servings if you are not going to be giving the top tier to them free. Hope that makes sence

tryingcake Posted 26 May 2011 , 6:39pm
post #28 of 34

I firmly believe we should go with industry standards. It's the same as women's clothing. For this designer I wear a size 8 - for that one a 10 but I even have a few size 4's that fit great. What a crock! Women's clothing used to have an industry standard and I wish they would go back to that.

So, I stick with the industry standard for cakes. Which I personally feel is enough cake for any one person, dinner included or not. It's cake for Pete's sake. It's not supposed to fill your tummy up, ever! But I digress....

I tell my customer's what an industry size serving is, I have a plastic example to show them and I include a cutting chart with every cake that goes out my door.

And, I charge the same per serving base charge regardless of what you are doing with it. I don't care if it's a birthday cake or wedding. This is my base price and it goes up from there depending on the design.

TexasSugar Posted 26 May 2011 , 7:03pm
post #29 of 34

Jules again you have confused me with IndyDebi, my comments were the ones you commented on. My comments also weren't made to you specifically. It was a general question to all of those that say give them bigger slices.

You did mention people with special dietary needs. That is a few people, that isn't including the whole wedding invitees.

I do personally have a big pet peeve with the super sizing of everything. I know that. And I know that not everyone agrees. The same comments come up about serving sizes all the time. Some people do feel the serving sizes are too small, others think they are perfect, and others just use them for a estimate and pricing. As a whole no one is right or wrong. I just don't understand the idea of the wedding party having to order, possible more cake than they need, just in case people want a large slice or to have to slices.

As far as the diabetic comment. My grandma was one for over 20 years. If something was planned when she needed to eat, then she did eat something ahead of time, and always had something in her purse in case she felt like she was going down. More often than not diabetic isn't going to be depending on cake as their food source.

dawncr Posted 26 May 2011 , 8:22pm
post #30 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by jules5000

dawncr, I agree with you on one point. Most of America's fast food chains supersize everything. or are willing too. Indydebbie is right in saying that the medium drinks now are what the Large used to be. Actually when I think about it I think that there are a lot of places that the medium drink is more what the extra large drink used to be.

However I did a quick drawing of the size that I suggested that a cake size be which was 2" x 2" X 4". It is not a large piece of cake. Even a 2 x3 would not be that large. I believe that you are not doubling the size of cake that they have. You are just making it half again as big as it was in only one measurement(on the 2 x 2 piece) on the cake is larger, but not doubled I believe people, for the most part would just have one piece. I believe that there are several reasons that people go back for seconds at a wedding besides the pieces not being very big. Sometimes it is the time the wedding is at and the reception that soon follows. A lot of times, a wedding starts sometime between lunch and dinner and by the time you have gotten yourself ready for the wedding you are hungry, but you do not want to take a chance on getting your outfit dirty so you just wait. By the time of the reception you are quite hungry. I am quite sure that there are those that would go back for more no matter what size it was, but they are the ones that are more likely the ones that have the problem. I am sure that there are several reasons people go back beside the one I mentioned.
I am sure that that happens a lot becausse it has to me. No you don't necessarily want to eat two pieces of cake, but by the time you get home it is too late to eat(we are assuming this is just a cake and punch reception. If there is food at the reception, it is easy to eat that and then eat just one piece of cake. If you are a person that is out of c ontrol with eating it doesn't matter what it is or how big, but we are talking the average person.




Hi Jules. I made an error in my previous post, by writing "sq inches" when I meant cubic inches. That may have been confusing. However, even if one doesn't want to deal with units of volume, a 2x2x4 piece of cake is *double* a regular serving, and a 2x3x4 piece of cake is *three* standard servings. Think about it: take a standard 1x2x4 serving. Place another standard 1x2x4 serving up against it. What do you have? A 2x2x4 piece of cake = double the amount.

At any rate, I also want to clarify my previous comments. I am talking about average, normal people, not people who have a compulsive overeating problem. The only "problem" is a culture that encourages the distortion of portion size. I don't want the caking industry to encourage and perpetuate that problem.

Hope that clarifies a little bit.

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