Butter????

Baking By Divatologist Updated 25 May 2011 , 9:06am by JanH

Divatologist Posted 24 May 2011 , 10:41am
post #1 of 10

I'm sure this question has been asked a million times. I used the search option for the forum and didn't see this particular subject. I Googled it as well and saw folks mention Plugra alot. I have to admit that I bake with margarine because I don't like the taste of butter, mainly Land O Lakes butter. I wanted to ask you guys as well.

I made a sock-it-to-me and red velvet cake for the group Foreign Exchange this weekend. I was told by one of the band members that I would be receiving some marriage proposals because of the sock-it-to-me cake icon_lol.gif The thing is I used margarine in the sock-it-to-me cake and in the cream cheese frosting for the red velvet. I'm just afraid it will make a drastic change in flavor if I use butter. I read that butter is best and gives your cakes the best flavor. I'm always afraid that butter will taste like the Land O Lakes butter tapedshut.gif

What kind of butter do you bake with? What do you think the best butter for baking is? I would like to try it in one of my recipes to see if there is a difference in taste.

9 replies
bbmom Posted 24 May 2011 , 11:16am
post #2 of 10

If everyone loves your recipe then why do you want to switch? I personally bake with butter. I don't like margarine. I usually use store brand unless name brand is on sale. I have never noticed a taste difference between butter brands.

rpaige Posted 24 May 2011 , 11:25am
post #3 of 10

Personally, I do find that there is a difference in taste and I don't think I have "selective tastebuds" - unlike my children. I'm new to baking and certainly don't have long-term professional advice; however, I have found that if I use the butter with no yellow dyes located in the healthy section of some groceries or health food stores, I have the best results and a brighter white color to my icing base. Better flavor as well. I do not have a package available at the moment or I would give you the brand name - not coming to mind right now. Maybe the lack of dyes would taste better to you.

I know some recipes will specifically say "butter not margarine" and I'm not sure of the exact baking science behind that instruction.

I hope other more experienced bakers will respond and give us both helpful direction.

psurrette Posted 24 May 2011 , 12:00pm
post #4 of 10

I buy Land O Lakes if its on sale but our store brand is pretty good. I do not like Cabot at all or shaw's brand. Never never do I use margarine yuck what is it made of anyway............its one molecule away from plastic.

rpaige Posted 24 May 2011 , 12:24pm
post #5 of 10

Strangely, I recently read an article on margarine and it actually concerned me when I saw some of the facts. The one comment that did stick out in my mind was that it was only one process away from being a plastic! I smiled when I saw your comment. Now, I can't say that the negative article was not paid for by the Butter Association! Who knows the source some "facts" these days.

I try to not get too crazy about these subjects because, after all, the baking and decorating of cakes, in general, would not be considered a "healthy" food option for many of us!

My suggestion is to give a few other butter brands a try and see what you think is best.

LindaF144a Posted 24 May 2011 , 3:08pm
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by rpaige

Personally, I do find that there is a difference in taste and I don't think I have "selective tastebuds" - unlike my children. I'm new to baking and certainly don't have long-term professional advice; however, I have found that if I use the butter with no yellow dyes located in the healthy section of some groceries or health food stores, I have the best results and a brighter white color to my icing base. Better flavor as well. I do not have a package available at the moment or I would give you the brand name - not coming to mind right now. Maybe the lack of dyes would taste better to you.

I know some recipes will specifically say "butter not margarine" and I'm not sure of the exact baking science behind that instruction.

I hope other more experienced bakers will respond and give us both helpful direction.




If there are yellow dyes in the butter, then by law they have to state that on the label.

What you are getting with the different color yellows is all dependent on what the cow was fed. Different diets will produce different shades of yellow. As well as when the milk was made. Spring butter will have a different shade than winter butter.

Also all butters have "butter flavoring" added to them. There are brands of butter that I don't like also.

The best way to get butter without butter flavoring is to make it yourself. It is so darn easy that you will not believe it. Put heavy whipping cream in your STAND mixer (don't do a hand mixer, you will die of boredom before it is done), and turn it to high gradually (wait for the cream to thicken before you put it on high. Otherwise it splashes too much. Or cover the mixer with a towel) and walk away. Wait about 10 minutes. You will see it has turned a yellowish color and is now solid with some liquid.

Drain the liquid into a bowl. Put the butter into a cheese cloth, squeeze it until all or most of the liquid comes out. Voila! Butter. You get about 13 ounces for a quart of whipping cream.

Do NOT throw out that liquid. It is buttermilk. And the real kind too. If you want the best cake ever, use that liquid in place of the liquid in any other recipe. The liquid does not keep longer than say 24 hours, so do use it right away. Plan on making one awesome buttermilk cake.

The butter will keep for about 90 days if you "rinse" it before you squeeze the liquid out. If you plan on using it all right away, don't bother with the rinse.

Again this will vary in color depending on the diet given to the cow.

Google "how to make butter" Out there somewhere is a fantastic video that some guy made that cracks me up every time I see it. He has a great sense of humor. Plus there are tons of places that will further explain my succinct notes here.

scp1127 Posted 24 May 2011 , 3:58pm
post #7 of 10

Linda, when I have used butter from ths Penn Dutch Market with ingredients, "butter", it was too much fat for baking. I haven't tested in my buttercreams, but I'm sure it would be great. I only use LOL because I like consistent results.

Butters, flours, sugars... are not created equal. I don't like surprises.

Divatologist Posted 25 May 2011 , 7:49am
post #8 of 10

Thanks for the replies everyone. I never knew those things they were saying about margarine until I started to read up on baking. I have been baking since I was a teenager, but I just recently took an interest in learning about the ingredients that go into baking. I just followed the directions, but never knew why you use baking powder or baking soda. I didn't understand what the creaming was for.

So, I was just wondering what butter you all preferred.

scp1127 Posted 25 May 2011 , 8:30am
post #9 of 10

Diva, get a few books if you love the science. My two favorites are Bakewise, by Shirley Corriher, and I'm Just Here For More Food, by Alton Brown.

JanH Posted 25 May 2011 , 9:06am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by psurrette

Never never do I use margarine yuck what is it made of anyway............its one molecule away from plastic.




This is an old wives tale/urban legend:

http://www.snopes.com/food/warnings/butter.asp

HTH

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