What Do You Do When....

Decorating By cakedup_cakes Updated 24 May 2011 , 6:12pm by BlakesCakes

cakedup_cakes Posted 23 May 2011 , 5:50pm
post #1 of 17

So I have a 3 tier cake coming up. After I give the customer the price and they paid the deposit, I found out about SPS (single plate separators). Now before I learned about SPS, I already had one disaster cake when the bottom could not support the rest of the cake and it started leaning and eventually fall apart. So now I use them and want to use it with this order. So I told the customer about it and told her that I would like to use them but it would be an additional $35 which is completely refundable as long as I received them back. The customer said they are completely maxed out and denied. The cake is not due until July so I don't really understand that part but whatever..... So what do I do about supporting the cake? Should I ask her to sign a waiver saying she denied the extra support, go ahead and use them anyway and count it as a lost or what....

16 replies
jenmat Posted 23 May 2011 , 6:24pm
post #2 of 17

ok, that is weird. I would tell them that while you understand their financial issue, you cannot do a cake that has the risk of falling over, that their day is more important to you than that.

I ask for a deposit check, and then I do not cash it unless the items are not returned. I know that's seems pretty silly of me, I live in an area where people are pretty honest, and they don't have a need for my items anyway.

It sounds like the SPS was something you came to them with after the initial consult, and that you are asking their permission to use it. Next time, you will know better than to ask, you just say this is what I use and this is how it is going to go down.
So, you have a choice. Tell them you won't do the cake, or suck up the cost and use sps on your dime. DON'T use dowels, if you'd had trouble before, you will have trouble again. BTW, SPS is really supposed to be a single use system anyway, so I would consider building it into the cost of the cake.

BlakesCakes Posted 23 May 2011 , 7:53pm
post #3 of 17

Sorry, but it's up to you to deliver a stable cake. If you feel that you can't do that any way but using the SPS, then you need to buy it and take the $ out of your profit.

It's not the client's fault that you didn't know about, or choose to use, SPS before you agreed on a price. She contracted for a stable cake, period.

If I were the client, I'd decline to pay additional monies, too--and I'd still expect an intact cake to be delivered--and I wouldn't accept anything less.

Now, if you do it any other way and have a disaster, you'll wind up refunding lots of $$$$.

And yes, it's a single use system, so the price should be included in the cake price with no expectations of having the pieces returned.

Rae

ccr03 Posted 23 May 2011 , 8:08pm
post #4 of 17

I agree 100% with blakescakes.

poohsmomma Posted 23 May 2011 , 9:44pm
post #5 of 17

And SPS is VERY inexpensive!

leah_s Posted 23 May 2011 , 10:03pm
post #6 of 17

icon_smile.gif

::wipes tear from eye::

The SPS chorus is singin'!!

debbief Posted 23 May 2011 , 10:15pm
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

icon_smile.gif

::wipes tear from eye::

The SPS chorus is singin'!!




icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

So SPS is only intended for single use? I haven't used it yet but plan to for a wedding cake coming up in Oct. I thought everyone reused them...assuming they got them back.

leah_s Posted 23 May 2011 , 10:25pm
post #8 of 17

Yes, it's intended to be disposable. With a new food code in my city, it's absolutely disposable now.

Here's what I tell them at the consultation when I get to the line on the invoice that reads Equipment.
You need support in your cake. I use a very secure system of plates and legs that lock together inside your cake. You probably will never see it, but when you walk into the reception hall and your cake is standing - it's in there working. Without it, your cake will fall down, so you have to buy it.

And every. single. time. , they say, OH YES! we want that!

KTB4 Posted 24 May 2011 , 12:51am
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by poohsmomma

And SPS is VERY inexpensive!




For you in the US it is. Sadly I can't buy it in Canada so have to pay HUGE money for shipping and duties when I do.

Thankfully last year I totally stocked up when a certain place online was having a 20% off sale. I'm good for a bit icon_biggrin.gif

Kiddiekakes Posted 24 May 2011 , 12:56am
post #10 of 17

I agree with KTB4..I wish there was a place here that sold them inexpensively.

labmom Posted 24 May 2011 , 4:43am
post #11 of 17

when you buy the sps do you buy the 4 inch colums or do you buy the 9 in?
and how do they cut if you buy the 9 inch?

I have an order filled out for plates and colums but I thought I would wait to hear from everyone on here before I jump in with both feet to see what works.

I had looked at cake jacks which were nice because of the adjustments but it just didnt feel right about the support .. I like the idea of the single plate and support of the legs.

I have a two tiered cake due in a couple weeks and then a 4 tier cakes due the following few weeks.. I would love some system that would make life easier.

I am not a fan of the metal ring system I can't remember the name of that system I do like the bakery craft system.

cakedup_cakes Posted 24 May 2011 , 12:07pm
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

icon_smile.gif

::wipes tear from eye::

The SPS chorus is singin'!!





Yes Leah, I learned about the SPS from YOU!!!! Thank you so much!! I didn't know that they were single use. I wish I would of waited to reply to her. I thought no one was going to reply to this question. I guess I'll just go ahead and suck up the cost :0( since they are not reusable. I called the people I place my order with and asked them if it was reusable and they said yes.... but anyway. I don't see what the big deal is she's not losing money, she's going to get it right back as long as she returned them, and I planned on doing the same thing as mentioned above, ask for a check and than return the check back to them but it's a lesson learned

cakedup_cakes Posted 24 May 2011 , 12:14pm
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by labmom

when you buy the sps do you buy the 4 inch colums or do you buy the 9 in?
and how do they cut if you buy the 9 inch?

I have an order filled out for plates and colums but I thought I would wait to hear from everyone on here before I jump in with both feet to see what works.

I had looked at cake jacks which were nice because of the adjustments but it just didnt feel right about the support .. I like the idea of the single plate and support of the legs.

I have a two tiered cake due in a couple weeks and then a 4 tier cakes due the following few weeks.. I would love some system that would make life easier.

I am not a fan of the metal ring system I can't remember the name of that system I do like the bakery craft system.




You should check out Leah's tutorial on Single Plate Separators (SPS) them :http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-603925.html

It much easier to buy the column the same height of the cake so you don't have to cut them.

sweetviolet Posted 24 May 2011 , 12:20pm
post #14 of 17

It looks like you've gotten your answer but I had another question for all the SPS users that are replying to your post. I'm not a pro baker, I don't have a shop or store, I make cakes for myself and friends.....but I've NEVER used the SPS and I've never had a cake fall or lean (sometimes they aren't perfectly straight to begin with, LOL) after assembly. Am I crazy? Is this something I def. should be using even if I've not had any problems up to this point? Any feedback would be great! Thanks!

bakingatthebeach Posted 24 May 2011 , 12:33pm
post #15 of 17

I never had one fall either, UNTIL I set up a wedding cake in a venue the the
A/C was off, window facing beach, melting buttercream and Im sure dowels not EXACTLY the same height. Mine wasnt so straight, then with all the movement of the dowels on transport and trying to set it up, well, 6 hours later the top tier slid off. After using SPS I dont use dowels anymore. My cakes are straight and travel great. And for me, its so much easier to stack using this.

cakedup_cakes Posted 24 May 2011 , 12:33pm
post #16 of 17

I'm not a pro either but I say if it ain't broke don't fix it. Me on the other had a problem with the past system I was using and had a disaster cake. Once I learned about the SPS I tried it and the cake came out good....well I did have one problem with the SPS, you could see the plates under the cakes so I had to put a border to hide it. I'm going to try to order a plate a size smaller than the cake for example if the cake is 8in, I'll use a 6in separator plate. Did I do something wrong for the plate to show...

BlakesCakes Posted 24 May 2011 , 6:12pm
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetviolet

I'm not a pro baker, I don't have a shop or store, I make cakes for myself and friends.....but I've NEVER used the SPS and I've never had a cake fall or lean (sometimes they aren't perfectly straight to begin with, LOL) after assembly. Am I crazy? Is this something I def. should be using even if I've not had any problems up to this point? Any feedback would be great! Thanks!




No, you''re not crazy! There are many, many ways to skin a cat--and to stack a stable cake.

I'm more than a hobbieist and less than a pro. I deliver stacked cakes and have never used any of the "plate & leg" systems, like SPS. I haven't had any issues, knock wood.

I use 3/16th inch foamcore boards under every tier, I cut my bubble tea straws even & level, I use a level to make sure that things are the way they should be, I deliberately stick tiers together with buttercream or wet fondant, and all of my cakes travel in a flat SUV bed lined with 2 layers of memory foam.

You do what works for you based on time, $$, & results. No one person's method is necessarily right for every other person.

Rae

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