When To Crumb Coat

Decorating By Rhonlynn Updated 24 May 2011 , 1:50am by Rhonlynn

Rhonlynn Posted 23 May 2011 , 3:58pm
post #1 of 12

My mom and I are having a debate as to when to apply the first layer of icing, or crumb coat. i thought I learned to cool the cake, or even freeze it, then crumb coat it. She says, as soon as it comes out of the oven, apply the first layer of frosting. Ofcourse she's not dealing with crusting buttercream, or a Wilton's cake course.

What is the right way to do the crumb coat? Oh, and i'm ordering Sugarshack's DVD. But I wanted an answer before I got the DVD. Thanks!

11 replies
aprilismaius Posted 23 May 2011 , 4:10pm
post #2 of 12

I agree with your method.

carmijok Posted 23 May 2011 , 4:21pm
post #3 of 12

I always freeze my layers before filling and crumb coating. If you crumb coat a warm cake it will melt the frosting and make a gooey mess I would think...particularly if the cake begins to crumb or even come apart.

bakingatthebeach Posted 23 May 2011 , 4:51pm
post #4 of 12

I crumb coat after the cake is cooled, the filling in the center of the cake will just melt if you do it when its warm.

Sangriacupcake Posted 23 May 2011 , 4:57pm
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhonlynn

Ofcourse she's not dealing with crusting buttercream, or a Wilton's cake course.




What icing are you talking about? I have a couple of recipes that call for glazing a cake when it's hot. But an actual crumb coat???? I can't imagine how that would work.

Sangriacupcake Posted 23 May 2011 , 5:07pm
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhonlynn


What is the right way to do the crumb coat? Oh, and i'm ordering Sugarshack's DVD. But I wanted an answer before I got the DVD. Thanks!




I don't think there's any one correct way to do a crumb coat. Like Carmijok, some chill or freeze the layers before filling and crumb-coating, and some just work with room temp cake. I like to fill and crumb coat as soon as the cake is properly cooled, then chill for about 30 minutes which creates a nice firm surface for applying the final coat.

I love Sugarshack's buttercream dvd, but Sharon Zambito does not crumb coat. Lots of decorators feel that a crumb coat isn't helpful to them.

hth

bakingatthebeach Posted 23 May 2011 , 5:16pm
post #7 of 12

I use buttercream, fill and crumb coat after cake is cooled then I let it settle then I finish icing it.

Rhonlynn Posted 23 May 2011 , 6:27pm
post #8 of 12

It's buttercream. Actually, it's a recipe from a forum post here, and it works better than Wilton. It tastes like icecream, and smooths very well.

msulli10 Posted 23 May 2011 , 6:50pm
post #9 of 12

Rhonlynn, what recipe is it? Just curious.

instant-gratificaketion Posted 23 May 2011 , 7:36pm
post #10 of 12

I'm curious about the recipe too!

Rhonlynn Posted 24 May 2011 , 1:50am
post #12 of 12

Imagenthatnj-that is it. Infact, that buttercream tastes like our Christopher Elbow Glace ice cream. I am not an ice cream person, but i want to eat the icing from the bowl. And oh it smooths perfectly. I've used it twice (with class final cakes for tomorrow, I didn't think I performed well in class, so I fully decorated one,and the other I'll ad what she is teaching us tomorrow. It's a little 6 x 2, and I didn't crumb coat it, and they are incredibly smooth.

It is very humid here, so the one large cake, I keep blotting it the oil just goes to the cake board, and stays there, but the thing is, it's smooth. If it were made for anyone, I'd move around the watermelon and pineapple in the refrigerator, and I'd not have the problem. I just keep crossing my fingers that our electricity stays how it is, with the air conditioner running, and everything stays how it is.

I'm going to get Sugarshack's DVD, and learn to ice it without the first coating.

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