Decorating By n_jean Updated 22 May 2011 , 10:47pm by jason_kraft

n_jean Posted 22 May 2011 , 10:36pm
post #1 of 3

I dont have a picture yet because I'm still working on it, but how do you get past the, "I'm selling this for $$, OMGosh, I wouldnt pay that!"

Maybe its just me because I'm such a tight a$$ but I have decided that 1.5 per serving is resonable but then you start adding it up. 9X13 sheet cake double layer with filling. It is the Strawberry Lemonade cake w/ a Strawberry buttercream filling. I know that $84 is truly what I should charge for this but icon_eek.gif wowzers...

There will be no fondant on this cake all buttercream for a graduation cake. Thanks for tip and advise!!!!!


2 replies
Kiddiekakes Posted 22 May 2011 , 10:43pm
post #2 of 3

It not only about the ingredient cost but your time as well.People are paying you for a custom creation and that comes with a price!!If it takes you 3-4 hours to do a cake for example you want to be paid $5.00 an hour..Probably not so charge for your time and what you are worth..People will pay it if they want it!!

jason_kraft Posted 22 May 2011 , 10:47pm
post #3 of 3

Cakes for parties are served very differently from wedding cakes, serving sizes are considerably bigger. Most of our business is party cakes, and we start at $69 for a quarter sheet double layer cake that would serve about 25 people. Fruit filling and fondant are extra.

But that won't really help you, since we probably have very different cost structures...I live in CA where it is illegal to sell baked goods made from home, so we have to pay for commercial kitchen rent, inspection fees, etc. To find out what you should be charging, add up your ingredient costs, labor costs, and overhead on a per-order basis, then add 20-30% for your profit margin. Of course make sure you can legally sell cakes from home in your state first, if not you should charge $0 until you can secure a commercial kitchen.

Quote by @%username% on %date%