Mff Questions

Decorating By AnnieCahill Updated 23 May 2011 , 3:51pm by AnnieCahill

AnnieCahill Posted 22 May 2011 , 7:52pm
post #1 of 12

Hey ya'll, just a couple of questions. Even though I've been decorating for almost 15 years now, I never really ventured into fondant territory. I have done a few accents with Wilton fondant, which was easy to work with, but I've never been asked to do a full fondant cake. I'm thinking about making some of Michele's fondant, but I had a couple of questions.

1. Do you think this fondant is ok for a newb to make and work with? I'm worried about not getting the right texture and screwing it up.

2. I'm worried about coloring it. I have a very colorful cake coming up and from what I've read, it's best to color it in the beginning during the cooking process. If I make two batches, is it easy to color once it's made? I don't think I'll be able to color it during the cooking because of all the colors I have to work with.

3. How is it for modeling figures?

Thanks in advance for your help!

AW

11 replies
didavista Posted 22 May 2011 , 8:22pm
post #2 of 12

I Love this fondant I find it very easy to work with and consistent every time. It's definitely easier to color in the liquid stage. You can color after just alot of kneading, which personally I try to avoid

didavista Posted 22 May 2011 , 8:22pm
post #3 of 12

I Love this fondant I find it very easy to work with and consistent every time. It's definitely easier to color in the liquid stage. You can color after just alot of kneading, which personally I try to avoid

AnnieCahill Posted 22 May 2011 , 9:18pm
post #4 of 12

Does it take color well? I guess the kneading is a pain but necessary when you need to make several colors out of one batch.

Do you have any suggestions about the pliability? I have read that if you put all the powdered sugar in it can get dry. I'm only used to using the Wilton fondant so that's my only frame of reference here.

didavista Posted 22 May 2011 , 9:47pm
post #5 of 12

I Think it colors very well. If a dark red or black sometimes it gets unworkable I just knead in a little more glycerine, that had always taken care of that problem..i got my calculator out one day and figured the recipe out for half batch, quarter etc.so I can color as needed that way or have less left overs

AnnieCahill Posted 22 May 2011 , 10:01pm
post #6 of 12

Thanks so much again. By the way, I noticed there are three recipes for her fondant listed...which one is the "best" one to use? I copied the one with all of her additional notes-it's the one I was planning on using.

Thanks again!

AW

Sugarflowers Posted 23 May 2011 , 4:13am
post #8 of 12

Wow! Finally new and wonderful questions!

If you use gel coloring then you might need more powdered sugar to make up for the glycerin in the color. If you use powdered color it can be darker. Use high quality petal dust (not luster dust). If you use powdered candy color it usually leaves specks of color that will never fully integrate onto the fondant. I like this for some designs.

You might want to make a half batch to test consistency and color correctness.

If you do have add more color after it has set be careful of changing the consistency. Gel colors mix quickly, but will soften the fondant. Knead with powdered sugar. Powdered colors can be slightly drying. Keep some glycerin on hand to keep it soft. Use only small amounts at a time. Some shortening on your hands will help.

As for modeling, add a little tylose to help it dry faster. Knead in 1-2 tsp. Of tylose to a fist sized piece of fondant. Let it rest over night for best results.

HTH

Michele

AnnieCahill Posted 23 May 2011 , 1:13pm
post #9 of 12

Michele,

Thanks so much for your reply. I really appreciate it. I did find your thread that had info about your fondant. Thanks for taking time to answer all those questions.

Hopefully a fondant newb can do this. I guess my only other question is which recipe should I use? I copied the one with the three tablespoons of ingredients (I think it was the updated version).

Thanks again!

Annie

AnnieCahill Posted 23 May 2011 , 1:14pm
post #10 of 12

Ok I lied-one more quick question....

If you don't have a steamer, what can you do to make the fondant shiny?

Thanks,
Annie

Sugarflowers Posted 23 May 2011 , 2:28pm
post #11 of 12

A friend told me that she sprays the cake with Everclear (grain alcohol). It's fast and dries quickly. It also won't leave spots that water can.

As for which recipe, any of them will work. I use the one with 3 Tbsp. gelatin. This is because the corn syrup that I can get is quite watery. If you use glucose then 1-2 Tbsp. The weather and general climate of where you live can make a difference in how much gelatin AND powdered sugar you use.

I'm sorry I can't be more precise. I just know that when I take my fondant to a less humid location it dries out quickly. The same goes for my gumpaste. I use very stuff gumpaste because I have hot hands and it's humid most of the time here. I did a demo in a dry state and my gumpaste began to dry before I could finish making the flower.

Experiment until you get the results that you want.

Michele

AnnieCahill Posted 23 May 2011 , 3:51pm
post #12 of 12

Awesome thanks so much for your help! I am nervous but very excited!

Thanks again!

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