Pencil Transfer Onto Fondant

Decorating By Crissielyn Updated 6 May 2013 , 8:49am by 2txmedics

Crissielyn Posted 19 May 2011 , 7:45pm
post #1 of 20

Hello,

I read an older post here where the person transferred a drawing onto their cake by drawing it out with pencil on paper and then laying the paper onto the fondant (pencil side down). I believe it left a faint line where she was then able to paint her image onto the fondant. Several sources online state that there is no lead in a #2 pencil and that the graphite used is harmless. (plus I would imagine it would only be a trace amount).

Does anyone have experience with this? How did it work out for you? I would imagine it would have to be done immediately after you put the fondant on the cake before it dries? Any tips?

Thanks!

19 replies
brown_suga Posted 19 May 2011 , 8:28pm
post #2 of 20

I've never tried this technique before but Master Sugar Artist Toba Garrett uses this technique quite frequently in her books and classes. I have seen it done with a graphite pencil and it does leave a faint line on the fondant. I thought it was done when the fondant was slightly dry as to not leave an imprint when you rub the transfer on it but I'm not quite sure. You can always try it out on a small test piece of fondant first. HTH

m_willford Posted 19 May 2011 , 8:32pm
post #3 of 20

I know that when my DH got a huge chunk of pencil lead stuck in his foot, we were told it wouldn't really do any harm if it never came out, because it's just graphite. That being said, I don't think graphite is exactly food safe even if it's non-toxic. So I would hesitate. Piping gel might be a better alternative.

Surprisingly, petal dusts are non-toxic, but not meant for a consumption. Which is why they go on gum paste decorations. Who would eat those? Lol.

But if you do try the graphite, I would try it out on a spare piece fresh and then one that has been left out a little and dried, so you can see which one way works better. And it's not going to hurt anyone.

ajwonka Posted 19 May 2011 , 8:45pm
post #4 of 20

For the palm leaves on my easter cake, i drew the outline, rubbed it on slightly dry gumpaste, & could lightly see the outline to cut out with manicure scissors. Worked well & i knew no one would eat them anyway!

Davwattie Posted 19 May 2011 , 8:53pm
post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crissielyn

Hello,

I read an older post here where the person transferred a drawing onto their cake by drawing it out with pencil on paper and then laying the paper onto the fondant (pencil side down). I believe it left a faint line where she was then able to paint her image onto the fondant. Several sources online state that there is no lead in a #2 pencil and that the graphite used is harmless. (plus I would imagine it would only be a trace amount).

Does anyone have experience with this? How did it work out for you? I would imagine it would have to be done immediately after you put the fondant on the cake before it dries? Any tips?

Thanks!




Ive done this a few times (the small badges/emblems on a couple of cakes in my pics)and it does work better on drier fondant.

I usually use greaseproof paper and trace over the image ive printed out, turn the paper over and lightly go over the outlines of the picture again and then turn the right way up and go over the picture again onto the fondant.

It only leaves a very faint outline so you can easily paint it.

Davwattie Posted 19 May 2011 , 8:54pm
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crissielyn

Hello,

I read an older post here where the person transferred a drawing onto their cake by drawing it out with pencil on paper and then laying the paper onto the fondant (pencil side down). I believe it left a faint line where she was then able to paint her image onto the fondant. Several sources online state that there is no lead in a #2 pencil and that the graphite used is harmless. (plus I would imagine it would only be a trace amount).

Does anyone have experience with this? How did it work out for you? I would imagine it would have to be done immediately after you put the fondant on the cake before it dries? Any tips?

Thanks!




Ive done this a few times (the small badges/emblems on a couple of cakes in my pics)and it does work better on drier fondant.

I usually use greaseproof paper and trace over the image ive printed out, turn the paper over and lightly go over the outlines of the picture again and then turn the right way up and go over the picture again onto the fondant.

It only leaves a very faint outline so you can easily paint it.

Davwattie Posted 19 May 2011 , 8:54pm
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crissielyn

Hello,

I read an older post here where the person transferred a drawing onto their cake by drawing it out with pencil on paper and then laying the paper onto the fondant (pencil side down). I believe it left a faint line where she was then able to paint her image onto the fondant. Several sources online state that there is no lead in a #2 pencil and that the graphite used is harmless. (plus I would imagine it would only be a trace amount).

Does anyone have experience with this? How did it work out for you? I would imagine it would have to be done immediately after you put the fondant on the cake before it dries? Any tips?

Thanks!




Ive done this a few times (the small badges/emblems on a couple of cakes in my pics)and it does work better on drier fondant.

I usually use greaseproof paper and trace over the image ive printed out, turn the paper over and lightly go over the outlines of the picture again and then turn the right way up and go over the picture again onto the fondant.

It only leaves a very faint outline so you can easily paint it.

Davwattie Posted 19 May 2011 , 8:56pm
post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crissielyn

Hello,

I read an older post here where the person transferred a drawing onto their cake by drawing it out with pencil on paper and then laying the paper onto the fondant (pencil side down). I believe it left a faint line where she was then able to paint her image onto the fondant. Several sources online state that there is no lead in a #2 pencil and that the graphite used is harmless. (plus I would imagine it would only be a trace amount).

Does anyone have experience with this? How did it work out for you? I would imagine it would have to be done immediately after you put the fondant on the cake before it dries? Any tips?

Thanks!




Ive done this a few times (the small badges/emblems on a couple of cakes in my pics)and it does work better on drier fondant.

I usually use greaseproof paper and trace over the image ive printed out, turn the paper over and lightly go over the outlines of the picture again and then turn the right way up and go over the picture again onto the fondant.

It only leaves a very faint outline so you can easily paint it.

Davwattie Posted 19 May 2011 , 8:57pm
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crissielyn

Hello,

I read an older post here where the person transferred a drawing onto their cake by drawing it out with pencil on paper and then laying the paper onto the fondant (pencil side down). I believe it left a faint line where she was then able to paint her image onto the fondant. Several sources online state that there is no lead in a #2 pencil and that the graphite used is harmless. (plus I would imagine it would only be a trace amount).

Does anyone have experience with this? How did it work out for you? I would imagine it would have to be done immediately after you put the fondant on the cake before it dries? Any tips?

Thanks!




Ive done this a few times (the small badges/emblems on a couple of cakes in my pics)and it does work better on drier fondant.

I usually use greaseproof paper and trace over the image ive printed out, turn the paper over and lightly go over the outlines of the picture again and then turn the right way up and go over the picture again onto the fondant.

It only leaves a very faint outline so you can easily paint it.

Crissielyn Posted 19 May 2011 , 9:08pm
post #10 of 20

I did try it out on a small piece of fondant. A very fresh pencil trace placed on a very piece of fondant transferred the image very well. However, it did not work very well on a piece of fondant that was dry. The "dry" fondant had only been sitting out for 5 minutes.

I'm not sure it's possible to draw out an intricate image and get it onto a freshly applied and smoothed fondant in a couple minutes time.

Sorta of wondering if I should already have the image drawn on the paper so I cam stick it on the cake straight away? Or, does the pencil somehow dry out on the paper so the pencil drawing would need to be as fresh as possible?

brown_suga Posted 19 May 2011 , 9:35pm
post #11 of 20

The drawing should be fresh if you leave it on the paper too long it will kind of settle into the paper since it's a porous material.

mcaulir Posted 19 May 2011 , 10:00pm
post #12 of 20

Depending what you're going to do with the design after it's on the fondant, another alternative is to put your design on paper, on the cake, then use a pin to poke little holes through the paper into the fondant.

imagenthatnj Posted 19 May 2011 , 10:04pm
post #13 of 20

What about that other method? Royal icing on acrylic piece. Would that work? Not sure what you're trying to transfer. If that doesn't work, then you might have to do the pin-prick transfer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FqbDTaauGO0&feature=related

Crissielyn Posted 19 May 2011 , 10:17pm
post #14 of 20

Dont want to do the RI on acrylic/glass trick or the pin prick trick on this particular cake. Those would work good if you are going to pipe the image on top of the RI impression or tiny holes.

I wanted to be able to get a faint outline that I can follow so that I can paint the image right on the fondant.

It makes sense that the pencil would need to be fresh. Guess I will apply the fondant, draw the image as quickly as possible on the paper, and then put it onto the slightly dry fondant....

Serena4016 Posted 19 May 2011 , 10:47pm
post #15 of 20

I have painted on fondant before and I have used pencil to transfer my design...See the cardinals and the hummingbird in my photo gallery. I have not painted directly on the fondant when it is on the cake. I have cut a piece of fondant let it dry slightly and then transferred the design. However the same procedure should apply...This is how I transfer the design.... Take your drawing, flip it over and trace the most important lines with pencil ( hold it up to a window if you can not see your drawing through the paper).Then flip it back over so you are looking at the front again, place it on your cake where you want it and re-draw over those same areas that you just drew on on the back. This will transfer those lines onto the fondant. You can't just rub on it. That will not give you anything. You need to actually draw the design. You will have to figure out how much pressure to use so you will not dent the fondant but you will see a faint line. Hope this helps!!

Serena4016 Posted 19 May 2011 , 10:51pm
post #16 of 20

Pencil will not dry out. It doesn't matter how old the drawing is.

Crissielyn Posted 19 May 2011 , 11:23pm
post #17 of 20

Thank you Serena. I had printed my image in reverse thinking I would be transferring the image on the printed side.

Sounds like to use the technique that you described I would not need to print it in reverse as I am actually drawing on the plain side (not the printed side).

Serena4016 Posted 20 May 2011 , 1:19pm
post #18 of 20

Correct! I have my original image and then I actually make photo copies of it to use to transfer. I do this just so the original stays clean and neat and I can refer back to it for details without it being drawn all over!! However I want it to look on the cake is exactly how I draw it on the paper.

Crissielyn Posted 20 May 2011 , 5:19pm
post #19 of 20

Just wanted to say that I used the technique described by Serena last night and it worked well. If I had simply drawn the image in pencil and placed it on the cake, it would not have transferred well at all. You really do need to trace the image again on the other side once its placed on the cake. I was able to do it with steady, but light pressure and it did not indent the fondant.

Thanks to everyone for your advice!

2txmedics Posted 6 May 2013 , 8:49am
post #20 of 20

Would this work on Crusted BC?....mine gets pretty firm...but wondering if it would work...Never have read if it can be done, anyone know?

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