Anyone Heard Of This...whipping Cream, ...

Baking By b-marie Updated 20 May 2011 , 3:46am by panchanewjersey

b-marie Posted 18 May 2011 , 12:46pm
post #1 of 11

I'm very new to this, and am searching for that "perfect" cake recipe...yesterday a friend gave me a very simple recipe, I made it last night, and it was GREAT, but she didn't have a name for it, and didn't know whether it would stack well or not...

1 pint of heavy whipping cream
2 cups of sugar
2 cups of self-rising flour
4 large eggs

Like I said, the cake was great, unlike the recipes I've been testing, everything seems to turn out dry...this one was very moist and had a wonderful flavor...just wondering about the stacking thing...

10 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 18 May 2011 , 1:11pm
post #2 of 11

Stacking is more about supports and less about the cake being really durable. As long as you've got the right supports in the cake, you can stack just about anything.

SecretAgentCakeBaker Posted 18 May 2011 , 1:17pm
post #3 of 11

There is no flavoring, such as vanilla, in the recipe?

Jennifer353 Posted 18 May 2011 , 1:32pm
post #4 of 11

Sounds like a really interesting cake... would you mind sharing the method etc so I could try it too?
Sorry without having seen a baked version of a cake I wouldn't even be able to try giving an opinion on stacking, etc

genevieveyum Posted 18 May 2011 , 1:34pm
post #5 of 11

Hmm- no butter? I'm surprised that the fat from the cream would be enough. The only way to know if it'll stack is to try it! Is it dense, or light and fluffy? The fluffier and more crumbly it is, the harder it will be to stack imho.

sillywabbitz Posted 18 May 2011 , 1:38pm
post #6 of 11

I'm with Texas_rose, it's about the support system more than the cake. Something like SPS should be no problem. If the cake is very light then it may not hold up under fondant but stacking with proper supports should be fine.

b-marie Posted 18 May 2011 , 2:12pm
post #7 of 11

Thanks for all of the replies! Very useful information...I'm going to just give it a try using dowels, I've never even stacked a cake before, but I'm gonna give it a shot and hope for the best!

Like I said, I'm VERY new to this, but if I were to tell you if this cake was light, or fluffy, or dense, I would have to say it is very light and fluffy.

As for the method, I didn't do anything special...didn't sift the flour, just combined all the ingredients and mixed with a hand-held mixer, poured the batter in two 8" square pans greased with Wilton's cake release.

No butter, and no vanilla...I wondered about the vanilla myself, and ALMOST added a teaspoon, but didn't.

matthewkyrankelly Posted 18 May 2011 , 2:38pm
post #8 of 11

This is basically a butter cake. A little vanilla would be nice, but any flavor would be good.

The heavy cream is about a third butter. The self rising flour has baking powder and salt in it.

All in all, seems like a nice quick recipe.

LindaF144a Posted 18 May 2011 , 6:37pm
post #9 of 11

Yep, butter can be made from heavy cream, so I suppose this would work.

It is the whole dump thing and mix that I need to try just see what I get for a cake.

And you don't need self-rising flour. 2 tsp of baking powder and 1/2 tsp of salt to AP flour would be fine too.

auzzi Posted 20 May 2011 , 3:31am
post #10 of 11

Whipped Cream Cake
"The American Womans Cookbook" 1938

3 cups sifted cake flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
4 teaspoons baking powder
2 cups heavy cream
4 eggs, beaten thick and lemon-colored
2 cups sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease two 9-inch-round cake pans or line them with parchment paper.

In a medium bowl, sift the flour, salt and baking powder together. Set aside.

Using a hand-held or stand mixer on high speed, whip the cream until soft peaks form. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating until light and foamy. Add the sugar, then the vanilla extract. Gently incorporate the flour mixture into the egg mixture. Place half of the batter into each of the prepared cake pans and bake 30 to 35 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake has only loose crumbs attached. Transfer to a wire rack. After about 20 minutes, invert the cake layers on the rack to cool completely.

"Rose's Heavenly Cakes" has a version: and there are others floating around the Internet also.

panchanewjersey Posted 20 May 2011 , 3:46am
post #11 of 11

I could imagine it taste good because of the heavy cream. Mmmm have to try it.

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