Starting To Stress Out... What Should I Do? (Kinda Long)

Decorating By CiNoRi Updated 12 May 2011 , 5:13pm by cai0311

CiNoRi Posted 12 May 2011 , 1:56pm
post #1 of 9

Hi all!

So i have a little dilemma. I have a client who is wanting to order a cake for a party in a few months. From day one I told them that the delivery date they wanted was unavailable due to an industry conference that I, as well as my colleagues will be going to. So there would be no one to make or deliver the cake to them that given day.

I did however offer to make it and deliver a few days early assuring them that the cake's taste/ freshness would be fine for the party.

So after i stressed all of the concerns they said they would think about it and let me know...no problem, understandably.

Then starting about a day later I was contacted about changing the design. There was no word on their concerns for early delivery/etc. So I sent a quote...a few days later they contact me again changing the design a second time, to something more intricate. We go back and forth for about a week, changing the design a 3rd time, again more involved... and sent yet another quote.

Now all of a sudden they are concerned again about the early delivery. I was about to email them back asking what exactly is the concern:

1) the cake being created too early
or
2) my delivery, then if they would need to transport it to another venue (Mind you i have asked for party venue info and never received it, so i was going on the assumption that the party is at a person's home).


Now im trying to be as flexable an acomidating as i can...but I feel i was upfront about avalibility, and i can only do but so much.

What do you think i should do?

I was going to reassure them that the freshness/ etc of the cake would be fine... and if their concern lies in the transportation .... I would check into hiring someone to setup and deliver... but this in fact would cause the delivery charge to go up. (I already charge almost nothing for delivery.... and im sure the cost of my cakes for what you get is far lower than the average - new business & I try to accommodate clients as much as possible - but as said before...I feel I have to draw the line somewhere icon_wink.gif )

What do you think? Should it handle it differently?


Thanks

8 replies
leah_s Posted 12 May 2011 , 2:11pm
post #2 of 9

I think you were on the right track with your initial response. The date is simply not available.

They are setting you up for a big complaint and a full refund.

"The cake design wasn't the same after it sat for a couple of days."
"Although I was assured the cake would be fresh, I know it sat on my counter for two days and it was surely stale."

Run like the wind.

VaBelle Posted 12 May 2011 , 2:12pm
post #3 of 9

I think you're handling it perfectly. You've been upfront about your availability so it's their choice. They're lucky you're even considering taking a job just before you go out of town.

TexasSugar Posted 12 May 2011 , 2:12pm
post #4 of 9

You keep saying a few days early. My question is, how many days early are we talking, and two how many days from baking/decorating and consumption are there?

I personally can't answer the concerns question with the vague a few days earlier. I am also one that doesn't like to have more than 4 days from the start of baking/decorating until the cake is eaten. I'm not saying after the 4th day the cake turns bad. I just always think about left over cake and people eating it the day after or the next day.

CiNoRi Posted 12 May 2011 , 2:21pm
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I think you were on the right track with your initial response. The date is simply not available.

They are setting you up for a big complaint and a full refund.

"The cake design wasn't the same after it sat for a couple of days."
"Although I was assured the cake would be fresh, I know it sat on my counter for two days and it was surely stale."

Run like the wind.




That's what I was kinda thinking too. Thanks! Makes me feel so much better hearing it from you! icon_wink.gif

CiNoRi Posted 12 May 2011 , 2:27pm
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

You keep saying a few days early. My question is, how many days early are we talking, and two how many days from baking/decorating and consumption are there?

I personally can't answer the concerns question with the vague a few days earlier. I am also one that doesn't like to have more than 4 days from the start of baking/decorating until the cake is eaten. I'm not saying after the 4th day the cake turns bad. I just always think about left over cake and people eating it the day after or the next day.




I totally hear you. I normally bake as close to the day before (and in some cases day of) the event as possible. At most 2 days prior, 1 day for baking, 1 for decorating.

There have been cases in the past where clients asked for me to deliver the cake as far out as 5 days prior, and I have still gotten rave reviews... but I do agree... i dont want to do that if I dont have to!


In this case...Id say bake on a Tuesday...and deliver Wednesday afternoon... then the party is on Saturday.

CiNoRi Posted 12 May 2011 , 2:57pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I think you were on the right track with your initial response. The date is simply not available.

They are setting you up for a big complaint and a full refund.

"The cake design wasn't the same after it sat for a couple of days."
"Although I was assured the cake would be fresh, I know it sat on my counter for two days and it was surely stale."

Run like the wind.




Sorry for the double post... But just thought some more. So what do you think is my best way out... and still save face? I mean I have told her that i can do a cake all along... and i can understand where they are coming from, I'd hate to loose them for potential future jobs (of which could be a wedding cake shortly there after -of which i need icon_wink.gif

The more i think about it...im just kinda stumped.

Thanks so much

cai0311 Posted 12 May 2011 , 5:12pm
post #8 of 9

There are a couple of ways you can back out and still save face. Assuming the client has not signed a contract/paid a deposit you can let me know that the date is no longer available. You don't have to say why the date is no longer available, let them think they waited too long and next time won't drag their feet making up their minds.

You could state something like this:
"I understand your concern about the cake still being fresh for your party. I feel that since I am not able to follow my regular schedule of baking and decorating the cake due to schedule conflicks it would be best if I do not take this order. Thank you for understanding."

You could also put the blame on the more complicated design. That because the currect design is more complex than the original and requires a longer decorating time, the cake would have to be made too far in advance and you don't feel comfortable with this.

cai0311 Posted 12 May 2011 , 5:13pm
post #9 of 9

There are a couple of ways you can back out and still save face. Assuming the client has not signed a contract/paid a deposit you can let me know that the date is no longer available. You don't have to say why the date is no longer available, let them think they waited too long and next time won't drag their feet making up their minds.

You could state something like this:
"I understand your concern about the cake still being fresh for your party. I feel that since I am not able to follow my regular schedule of baking and decorating the cake due to schedule conflicks it would be best if I do not take this order. Thank you for understanding."

You could also put the blame on the more complicated design. That because the currect design is more complex than the original and requires a longer decorating time, the cake would have to be made too far in advance and you don't feel comfortable with this.

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