Gluten Free

Baking By brittsaqtpie1 Updated 12 May 2011 , 5:14pm by LindaF144a

brittsaqtpie1 Posted 11 May 2011 , 3:45pm
post #1 of 20

I'm making a practice GF cake. Is MMF GF as well as Buttercream Frosting?

19 replies
CiNoRi Posted 11 May 2011 , 4:11pm
post #2 of 20

Should be ok... but double check the ingredients your MMF recipe/ the Marshmallows specifically.

What BC recipe do you use?

brittsaqtpie1 Posted 11 May 2011 , 4:20pm
post #3 of 20

I usually use Indy Debi's BC

CiNoRi Posted 11 May 2011 , 4:30pm
post #4 of 20

My Hubby has to have GF stuff now... and i use her's also, you should be fine. I use Sweetex Shortening wich is GF as far as I know... Id be surprised if any other shortenings were a problem.

One possible issue in any baking/cooking tho is Extracts... they are usually alcohol based... which can be made from non-GF materials.
I know a lot of the McCormick Branded stuff is GF but you might want to double check. For my hubby, I have been making stuff with a brand of extract that I have no idea if is GF... but he hasnt had issues yet... however I think it's depended on the person. So if you can get some that is GF so you dont have to worry

CanadianCakin Posted 11 May 2011 , 4:40pm
post #5 of 20

Watch your confectioners sugar as well, it's not always gf.
Health food stores sell gf. Again it also depends on the severity
and sensitivity of the person with intolerance.

CiNoRi Posted 11 May 2011 , 4:43pm
post #6 of 20

Oh I didnt know about Sugar. Thanks!!

brittsaqtpie1 Posted 11 May 2011 , 6:09pm
post #7 of 20

thank you all! You've been very helpful icon_smile.gif

jason_kraft Posted 11 May 2011 , 6:28pm
post #8 of 20

You don't have to worry about the alcohol in extracts, the distillation process automatically removes proteins from the alcohol (including any gluten that may have been present).

I've also never come across powdered sugar that wasn't gluten-free, the ingredients are almost always just sugar and cornstarch. Of course it's still important to check the ingredients as well as any statements indicating processing on shared equipment with other gluten-containing products.

LindaF144a Posted 12 May 2011 , 12:58am
post #9 of 20

So corn starch has gluten in it?

jason_kraft Posted 12 May 2011 , 1:05am
post #10 of 20

Corn starch does not contain gluten.

liha21 Posted 12 May 2011 , 1:18am
post #11 of 20

I've heard of people who are so sensitive to it that they can't have anything that was made on the same equipment as something containing gluten. I will be making my first gluten free cheesecake in less than a month, so I made sure to ask how sensitive the customer is. I'm still worried I will make a mistake.

Kima920 Posted 12 May 2011 , 1:33am
post #12 of 20

@Liha21 cross-contamination is huge problem with some people who are on gluten free diets because many of them have Celiac disease which makes them highly sensitive to gluten. I make many gluten free cakes and cupcakes for moms in the area who kids are autistic and are on gluten free diets. I have separate equipment for making those cakes and cupcakes including separate sponges and mixing bowls/mixers. I would check with the person you are making the cheesecake for first..and ask. You don't want to make someone sick. If you are in an area like me that doesn't cater to that group of people then you might want to invest in some separate equipment, it could be very profitable for you.
Kima

jason_kraft Posted 12 May 2011 , 1:35am
post #13 of 20

Many people with Celiac are sensitive enough that they will have a reaction if gluten-contaminated shared equipment had not been thoroughly cleaned and sanitized. Porous equipment (such as wooden spoons) cannot be properly sanitized, so you'll need dedicated versions of anything with porous surfaces. You'll also want to avoid baking anything gluten-free for at least 24 hours after you've done any baking with gluten to avoid contamination from airborne flour.

Here is a link with more info:
https://breadsfromanna.com/article/cross-contamination

coleslawcat Posted 12 May 2011 , 6:12am
post #14 of 20

You also need to make sure you are using fresh ingredients. Use a new container of baking soda, baking powder, any spices etc. If you previously used those for gluten cakes it is possible that they will be contaminated. And take seriously the flour in the air. I have celiac disease and have gotten sick from this when all other precautions were taken.

jason_kraft Posted 12 May 2011 , 6:20am
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by coleslawcat

You also need to make sure you are using fresh ingredients. Use a new container of baking soda, baking powder, any spices etc. If you previously used those for gluten cakes it is possible that they will be contaminated.



This can be avoided if you break up your mise en place into two parts when baking with gluten: mise all your non-gluten ingredients first, put them away, then finish with the gluten ingredients.

Of course if you haven't followed this procedure in the past you would need fresh ingredients, or dedicated GF containers that are only opened during GF baking (and stored separately, or at the very least above any gluten ingredients).

liha21 Posted 12 May 2011 , 12:53pm
post #16 of 20

Thank you so much for all your help. I was planning on making sure everything was super clean and taking the flour out of the kitchen, but wouldn't have thought of getting new ingredients.

This is also going to be a fondant covered cheesecake, which I have never done before either, I'm going to give it a practice run this weekend. any input on that?

LindaF144a Posted 12 May 2011 , 1:04pm
post #17 of 20

So if there is no gluten in corn starch, then why can't you use powdered sugar?

And is it true you can use any recipe, but just change out the type of flour you use?

jason_kraft Posted 12 May 2011 , 3:26pm
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

So if there is no gluten in corn starch, then why can't you use powdered sugar?



You can use powdered sugar...as I said earlier in the thread, I've never come across powdered sugar that wasn't gluten-free.

Quote:
Quote:

And is it true you can use any recipe, but just change out the type of flour you use?



You can, but you'll probably be disappointed with the results. It takes some experimenting to get gluten-free recipes just right. Luckily lots of people have already done the R&D and there are many great recipes and GF baking books available out there.

coleslawcat Posted 12 May 2011 , 3:47pm
post #19 of 20

I have heard there are powdered sugars that are blended with something other than corn starch and aren't gluten free. That said, I have never seen one.

There are some wonderful all purpose gluten free flours out there that you can sub 1:1 in traditional recipes. I have had wonderful luck with Tom Sawyer Flour and Better Batter Flour. With many recipes you can't tell the difference at all. However, those flours cost about $20 for a 5lb bag and normally need to be purchased online.

LindaF144a Posted 12 May 2011 , 5:14pm
post #20 of 20

Thank you Jason, I'll be starting my R&D on that soon. I did find a flour that was gluten free, but super expensive. I guess I will have to price accordingly.

As for getting powdered sugar that are blended with something else, the safest way to insure you get the right kind is buy top shelf. Dominos sugar comes to mind. I only use top shelf products after I got poor results trying to use the store brand stuff.

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