Torting And Filling Half Sheets, How Do You Not Break Them?

Decorating By sunset74 Updated 11 May 2011 , 2:35pm by itscake

sunset74 Posted 9 May 2011 , 3:19am
post #1 of 14

I am hoping someone here can give me some tips regarding torting and filling half sheet cakes. So far I have done this MANY times and I am trying to figure out if there is an easier way.

I have half sheet pans that are 3 inches deep and so I have been cutting them in half and putting half on a cake board and then putting it back on the filling, but they are REALLY hard to push onto the cake board and then push off without almost ripping them.

The other night I decided to try a different route and purchased a 2 inch deap pan and did 2 batches of batter per pan which was fine and it cooked fine and everything, but then when I wanted to put that layer on top of the other one I attempted this time to flip it onto the bottom. I got it there, but OMG it was not easy and definatly had to have a second set of hands which I do not want to have to rely on.

Can anyone tell me how they do this maybe make it easier for me.

THanks

13 replies
VeronicaLuis Posted 9 May 2011 , 3:41am
post #2 of 14

freeze the cake. The cake will become hard obviously and it won't break while you are transferring it. This is how I do it any way. Edna da la Cruz has a great video


Crazboutcakes Posted 9 May 2011 , 4:24am
post #3 of 14

I went to Michaels and boust a no sided cookie sheet (flat) that is big enough to handle a 1/2 sheet cake and then some, and what I do is after I cut the cake in the middle I use this cookie shet and slide it through and pick it up and set it aside than fill and replace it on top again, hopefully this link will work but this is kinda what I mean.


http://www.katom.com/268-977614.html?CID=pricegrabber copy and past if you can. It works great and I use it on all sizes. HTH

Crazboutcakes Posted 9 May 2011 , 4:25am
post #4 of 14

I went to Michaels and boust a no sided cookie sheet (flat) that is big enough to handle a 1/2 sheet cake and then some, and what I do is after I cut the cake in the middle I use this cookie shet and slide it through and pick it up and set it aside than fill and replace it on top again, hopefully this link will work but this is kinda what I mean.


http://www.katom.com/268-977614.html?CID=pricegrabber copy and past if you can. It works great and I use it on all sizes. HTH

sunset74 Posted 9 May 2011 , 4:25am
post #5 of 14

I have never frozen a cake because I have always been told when they thaw they will get dry so I have never tried it. Do you cut it while it is frozen, or should I torte it, Parchment between and then freeze.

sunset74 Posted 9 May 2011 , 4:31am
post #6 of 14

Crazboutcakes...that might work for me. I find it is SOOOO hard to push the heavy cake onto a second cake board and they are not supportive enough so this might work. Thanks for the suggestion.

cake_architect Posted 9 May 2011 , 4:32am
post #7 of 14

sunset, they don't dry out. i freeze every single cake i bake and they are soooooo moist when they thaw icon_biggrin.gif maybe do a taste test sometime so you can decide what works best for you icon_biggrin.gif it definitely makes it easer to manipulate!

sunset74 Posted 9 May 2011 , 4:42am
post #8 of 14

Cake Architect...I will definatly try that. Do you do as Edna said and wrap in plastic wrap and then foil. I am assuming that is after they have orginally cooled. Thanks for all the help everyone.

VeronicaLuis Posted 9 May 2011 , 5:16am
post #9 of 14

Absolutely wrap it really well. I cover mine in plastic and foil and then put it in a plastic container. If you wrap it before it's completely cold, and I mean cold on the outside but slightly warm in the middle, you get a bit of condensation happening and the cake is unbelievable moist. I flip my cakes out onto a cooling rack and then flip it in the plastic container and then in the freezer. I cut my cakes with a serrated knife when they have thawed slightly and it works a treat. Torting before freezing, you still have the same issue of them falling apart on you. If you don't want to freeze, try the fridge but still cover them really well.

sunset74 Posted 9 May 2011 , 5:20am
post #10 of 14

Thanks. I will give it a shot the next time I do a half sheet cake. I appreciate the suggestions.

cowie Posted 9 May 2011 , 10:26pm
post #11 of 14

I have a pizza lifter from pampared chef that I use. It's two half circles with handles and I slide them under the top cut part of the cake and life it up and off and vise versa. Works great!

Sassy74 Posted 10 May 2011 , 5:48pm
post #12 of 14

I cut larger sheets in half vertically to stack them. I put my first layer down on the board, fill as usual, then cut the top layer in half vertically with a sharp knife. That way, I can pick up half at a time to stack them evenly on top of the filling. Once iced, you'll never know. It saves the hassle of trying to man-handle a large layer without breaking/cracking.

Sweetwise Posted 11 May 2011 , 2:02pm
post #13 of 14

Love to watch Edna - her accent is so nice! I use a sheet pan as well. I show torting a little bit larger cake in my video here; using this method, I think you could torte just aout any size. Thanks for watching! icon_smile.gif


itscake Posted 11 May 2011 , 2:35pm
post #14 of 14

I use plastic place mats...to flip the cake on to..the thin plastic cutting boards work well too...I also use them when torting cakes...I slip the plastic sheet under the cut section and just lift off..I put each slice on its own plastic sheet...works well for me

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