Wedding Cake Number Of Servings

Decorating By camomama5 Updated 9 May 2011 , 12:50am by cakegirl1973

camomama5 Posted 9 May 2011 , 12:12am
post #1 of 6

If a bride says there are 90 guests do you add a few extra slices in like 100 guests to be sure there is enough? What is the common practice? And what would I charge for an anniversary cake on top of a cake this size? It would match the rest of the cake of course. And what is the standard size anniversary cake? The wedding cake will be fondant. Would the anniversary cake be fondant too? AND lastly, can they really be frozen for a year with fondant on them? Thank you!!!!!!!!!!

5 replies
cakegirl1973 Posted 9 May 2011 , 12:30am
post #2 of 6

I ask the customer how many guests they will have and typically factor one piece of cake per guest. I tell the customer this, and sometimes they tell me that they want a few more slices, especially if the cake is a different flavor on each tier, and if they want their guests to be able to try different flavors. 99.9% of the time, I do not "pad" the order with extra servings. Also, be sure to use the Wilton serving guide to decide the size of and number of tiers. It is very accurate.

Typically, the top tier is the anniversary tier. Often, it is a 6" cake. If the rest of the cake is fondant, then the top tier needs to be fondant, too. Yes, a fondant tier can be frozen, if properly wrapped before freezing. Hope this helps!

ShandraB Posted 9 May 2011 , 12:31am
post #3 of 6

Hmmm I really think it is up to the customer (and subject to the design) to determine how many servings. If they want more servings than the number of guests expected, then that would be the number of servings to charge for. I would charge the same for the anniversary cake, by the number of servings + any additional decorations if it is not being incorporated into the main cake. (I couldnt tell from your descriptions.) Again, it would be up to the customer to decide whether or not the anniversary cake will be fondant, just make sure you charge appropriately for what they order. I think that a 6 inch cake would be the most common for the anniversary cake.

You will find than many people disagree on freezing the cakes for a year. If this is the brides wish, I would make no guarantees as to the quality of the cake after that period of time. A lot depends on the type of cake, frosting, etc as well as how it is wrapped and how it is defrosted.

cakegirl1973 Posted 9 May 2011 , 12:41am
post #4 of 6

Just to be clear, when I said that the anniversary tier needs to be fondant, I was assuming that you were talking about the top tier and not a separate cake. In other words, if the entire cake is fondant, then the top tier (anniversary tier) needs to be the same as the rest of the cake. If you are making a separate cake as an anniversary cake, then the customer can decide if they want it covered in fondant or not.

I agree with the PP that you should make no guarantees about the cake, after it has been frozen for a year. Too many variables.

cakegirl1973 Posted 9 May 2011 , 12:42am
post #5 of 6

Just to be clear, when I said that the anniversary tier needs to be fondant, I was assuming that you were talking about the top tier and not a separate cake. In other words, if the entire cake is fondant, then the top tier (anniversary tier) needs to be the same as the rest of the cake. If you are making a separate cake as an anniversary cake, then the customer can decide if they want it covered in fondant or not.

I agree with the PP that you should make no guarantees about the cake, after it has been frozen for a year. Too many variables.

cakegirl1973 Posted 9 May 2011 , 12:50am
post #6 of 6

Just to be clear, when I said that the anniversary tier needs to be fondant, I was assuming that you were talking about the top tier and not a separate cake. In other words, if the entire cake is fondant, then the top tier (anniversary tier) needs to be the same as the rest of the cake. If you are making a separate cake as an anniversary cake, then the customer can decide if they want it covered in fondant or not.

I agree with the PP that you should make no guarantees about the cake, after it has been frozen for a year. Too many variables.

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