mommynana Posted 8 May 2011 , 1:30am
post #1 of

And I`m going to use nutella for the filling ? Do i still need a dam around the cake, It`s then going to be covered with fondant.

21 replies
Coral3 Posted 8 May 2011 , 1:33am
post #2 of

I probably would, just because nutella is pretty soft. Ganache is quite solid though so it *might* be okay without a dam...but it's better to be sure!

mommynana Posted 8 May 2011 , 1:40am
post #3 of

Thanks Coral3, I used nutella before for filling, But was crumb coated with buttercream, then fondant, ( that was only an 8" cake) but the one i was asking about is going to be 2 layers of 12" and 2 layers of 8" over that, and I was wondering if the ganache would be frim enough to hold it.

jules5000 Posted 8 May 2011 , 1:57am
post #4 of

Don't know where you live or how warm it is, but if you don't dam it and then for some reason the ganache gets soft while traveling to location you could have a mess with the nutella too. Both would be pretty susceptible to warm weather I would think as they both have chocolate in them. I think that the only way that I would feel comfortable with that cake not being dammed is if I traveled with it in a cooled refrigerated vehicle to the location. and it was kept cool until about 30 minutes until serving time. I certainly wouldn't do any kind of guarantees on the cake if it wasn't to be served indoors. Good luck.

mommynana Posted 8 May 2011 , 12:18pm
post #5 of

I see what you`r saying jules, But the location is only 20 min. away and my car dose have air, and its really not all that warm yet low 60s, mid 70`s, I was just wondering cuz i did`t want to put buttercream with the ganache,

ycknits Posted 8 May 2011 , 12:44pm
post #6 of

I use ganache frequently and never use a damn. In fact, I like to put a thick 'crumb coat' of ganache on my cakes, just to seal everything and stabilize the shape of the cake - not matter what filling I use. It totally eliminates buttercream-filling bulges icon_smile.gif

kimboann Posted 8 May 2011 , 12:56pm
post #7 of

I've never used ganache but so want to. Is it easy or difficult or somewhere in between! I'm only a hobby beginner baker and am a bit intimidated by it.

pattycakesnj Posted 8 May 2011 , 1:18pm
post #8 of

I never dam with ganache as the covering even if I am using fruit filling.

nanefy Posted 8 May 2011 , 1:49pm
post #9 of

You don't need a damn if you are using a decent layer of ganache on the outside - Ganache is like a concrete wall (except not quite so hard lol). I only ever use ganache and would never go back to using a buttcream - it just is so easy and takes away a ton of stress.

For anyone who wants to know the recipe here it is:

Dark Chocolate Ganache
For those in the UK: 2 parts chocolate to 1 part WHIPPING CREAM
For those in the USA: 2 parts chocolate to 1 part HEAVY CREAM
For those in Australia: 2 parts chocolate to 1 part PURE CREAM

White Chocolate and Milk Chocolate Ganache:
UK: 3 parts chocolate to 1 part WHIPPING CREAM
USA: 3 parts chocolate to 1 part HEAVY CREAM
Aus: 3 parts chocolate to 1 part HEAVY CREAM

I spent ages researching this and discovered the differences between creams in different parts of the world, this was after I had a white chocolate ganache disaster after using the UK double cream instead of whipping cream.

Anyway hope this answers any questions icon_smile.gif

nanefy Posted 8 May 2011 , 1:51pm

Oh also - I do it all by weight, so I weigh both the chocolate and the cream, so if I use 800g of dark chocolate, I use 400g of cream - I find doing it by volume can be a bit precarious especially considering different chocolate callets come in different sizes.

Freedomx6 Posted 8 May 2011 , 2:53pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by nanefy

Oh also - I do it all by weight, so I weigh both the chocolate and the cream, so if I use 800g of dark chocolate, I use 400g of cream - I find doing it by volume can be a bit precarious especially considering different chocolate callets come in different sizes.


I've been wanting to try this. Can you tell me how to prepare, and store it?

Also, is it like a mouse, or hard like chocolate?

kickasscakes Posted 8 May 2011 , 3:52pm

Curious about the same ganache we use on the outside of a cake.
I am wondering how, if possible to make it soft enough to whip and use as a filling. I have tried to heat it and then beat it, but it just resets hard.

I love ganache on a cake. So easy to work with. I would love to know how to use it IN the cake too.

nanefy Posted 8 May 2011 , 3:55pm

With ganache it is all about the consistency, you have to wait until it is at a peanut butter type consistency before you apply it to your cake.

I could explain it all, but here is a much better way - this is a set of videos by inspiredbymichelle and they are AMAZING!!! Three videos from ganache making to covering the cake with fondant:

http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=C0E3670CABF4D667

mommynana Posted 8 May 2011 , 4:33pm

Thank you all for you`r help, Im going to try it without the dam,

Freedomx6 Posted 9 May 2011 , 2:03am
Quote:
Originally Posted by nanefy

With ganache it is all about the consistency, you have to wait until it is at a peanut butter type consistency before you apply it to your cake.

I could explain it all, but here is a much better way - this is a set of videos by inspiredbymichelle and they are AMAZING!!! Three videos from ganache making to covering the cake with fondant:

http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=C0E3670CABF4D667


She is amazing. Thank you for the vids, I saved them to favorites, and I'm going to try it soon. I'm also going to try the square she uses for my buttercream to get smoother sides.

angelogoo Posted 9 May 2011 , 8:43am

I made and used Ganache for the very first time this past weekend and I think i am a convert now...except for the price!!! I am in the Uk and as i couldnt find any labelled HEAVY CREAM..i bought the double cream and it worked fine with the dark chocolate i used even though overnight it set too hard and i had to heat it up in the microwave to use it and by the time i finished applying it on the cake, it had set solid as well.

All in all, it took me well more time than BC does but the result was sharper edges that you can only dream off with the dreaded bulges and BC moving around. This thing wouldnt move even if you pocked it!! It is a messy business though and i had to do the fondant part twice as the fondant tore around the top edges and i had to take it off and make it thicker and try again. Did i mention that it was white fondant and now had chocolate marks so had to keep it aside and get a new one! the good thing was that there was no mark on the ganache, no scraping involved...i can go on and on on my first experience with Ganache.

ycknits Posted 9 May 2011 , 1:15pm

After my ganache sets up, I put a coat of buttercream over the ganache, chill it to firm it up, and then cover with fondant. I like the way that the fondant attaches to, and smooths over, buttercream better than over ganache.... no tears on sharp corners this way, but you still get the wonderful shape definition that comes with ganache. And everyone seems to love that ganache layer in the cake icon_smile.gif

mommynana Posted 9 May 2011 , 2:19pm

I love to hear everyone`s experience`s with ganache, everybody has diff. stories. What works for them and what dose`t work for them. And we can pick up diff. tips from everyone thumbs_up.gif

nanefy Posted 11 May 2011 , 4:47pm

angelogoo you shouldn't be using double cream if you are in the UK - it will work OK with dark chocolate but not with white or milk. If you read my post earlier I have the exact cream you need for USA, UK and Australia - In the UK you should be using Whipping Cream in the green container.

Also, if you are using an engineers square (the one used in the video) be sure to buy a stainless steel one, or it will rust terribly and you'll taste the metal through your ganache!!! not good!

cathyscakes Posted 11 May 2011 , 5:47pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by ycknits

After my ganache sets up, I put a coat of buttercream over the ganache, chill it to firm it up, and then cover with fondant. I like the way that the fondant attaches to, and smooths over, buttercream better than over ganache.... no tears on sharp corners this way, but you still get the wonderful shape definition that comes with ganache. And everyone seems to love that ganache layer in the cake icon_smile.gif


Your method sounds interesting, I'm always so afraid to try new methods but would love to try this on my next wedding cake. Just wondering if the buttercream sticks well to the ganache, i'd be afraid it would fall off I guess. Hope you can put my mind at ease and give me any tips, I'd like to have the taste of buttercream and the ganache

angelogoo Posted 12 May 2011 , 8:36am
Quote:
Originally Posted by nanefy

angelogoo you shouldn't be using double cream if you are in the UK - it will work OK with dark chocolate but not with white or milk. If you read my post earlier I have the exact cream you need for USA, UK and Australia - In the UK you should be using Whipping Cream in the green container.

Also, if you are using an engineers square (the one used in the video) be sure to buy a stainless steel one, or it will rust terribly and you'll taste the metal through your ganache!!! not good!




Thanks Nanefy,
I used double cream last night with dark chocolate and it was ok...anyway nothing to compare with as i have only made ganache twice and both with double cream. I will surely try whipping cream next time. Thanks for the tip. When i went to buy the cream I asked what i can use in place of heavy cream as its not stocked over here and people said to buy double cream.

mommynana Posted 12 May 2011 , 3:22pm

I have my cake in the fridge. now just covered it with the ganache, Made the ganache last night, And i choped the chocolate chips in my veg. chopper and it was so much easier, ganache was so much more smooth, I did`t put a dam around the cake and put the nutella filling, so far so good, Later i`ll cover it with fondant, And see how it goes, Wish me luck.

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