Mikel79 Posted 6 May 2011 , 10:00pm
post #1 of

Hi Cakers!!!

Please forgive the vulgar title. But, that is the best term I have seen used before. I am not talking about cake bulging from settling.

This is specifically regarding Butter Cream iced cakes. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to prevent these from occurring? Cake "Farts" is a term used to describe a small/huge air bubble that is pressing out against the butter cream icing. Eventually it will "Blow Out".

I made a cake today that was iced in butter cream. When I delivered it I noticed at the bottom/base of the cake a "fart" was starting to bubble out. LUCKILY, I had a hairpin and was able to poke it and press it back.

I crumb coat my cakes and do NOT freeze cakes in advance. The only thing that I can think of is I did not wait long enough for my crumb coat to set up? I normally wait 30-40 minutes at room temp. I only waited 20 this time.

This is the first time in awhile time that this has happened.

Here is the cake if you want to peek at it...

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/2025667

Thank you

Michael

46 replies
warchild Posted 6 May 2011 , 10:16pm
post #2 of

This should help.. icon_smile.gif

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-728-air.html+bubbles+frosting

http://whatscookingamerica.net/PegW/BubblesFondant.htm

http://www.wilton.com/forums/messageview.cfm?FTVAR_FORUMVIEWTMP=Single&catid=8&threadid=132750&ftvar_msgdbtable=

http://www.cakesbygeorge.com/Tips/air_bubbles_in_icing.htm

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-374073-.html&sid=a73ce55b463ede10b0d18aee5aca1cb4

AnotherCaker Posted 6 May 2011 , 10:16pm
post #3 of

I had that problem a few times, as soon as I stopped using criscocream type icings...never happened again.

leannrr Posted 7 May 2011 , 12:56am
post #4 of

I've had the same problem. I freeze cakes, let them come to room temperture and then frost. Do you think I'm not getting the icing onto the cake well enough? I can't figure it out. It has happened on cakes that I've never frozen too. This recipe had crisco. Never thought about crisco being the problem and haven't paid attention as to if it happens with the HR recipe. Any other ideas, I'm getting frustrated.

Mikel79 Posted 7 May 2011 , 11:22am
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by leannrr

I've had the same problem. I freeze cakes, let them come to room temperture and then frost. Do you think I'm not getting the icing onto the cake well enough? I can't figure it out. It has happened on cakes that I've never frozen too. This recipe had crisco. Never thought about crisco being the problem and haven't paid attention as to if it happens with the HR recipe. Any other ideas, I'm getting frustrated.





I have heard that Crisco does not have the trans fat needed for a good bc recipe. HR is the best to be uses.....

KellyJo3 Posted 7 May 2011 , 1:00pm
post #6 of

I think the cake looks beautiful!! You did such a great job!!! Sorry, I have no advice, I just love the cake! : )

Mikel79 Posted 7 May 2011 , 5:51pm
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by KellyJo3

I think the cake looks beautiful!! You did such a great job!!! Sorry, I have no advice, I just love the cake! : )




Thank you! I was able to save it. Luckily I bring a cake repair kit with me on deliveries.


=)

sweetartbakery Posted 6 Jun 2011 , 11:15am
post #8 of

I have this issue too and its killing me! I always use fresh baked cakes, always crumb coat, as allow for settling. There really doesn't seem to be any constant reason for it... would love to know why. I have done cakes this way for years and now, out of no where.... bubbles and blisters wrecking my cakes!

I noticed my buttercream getting a little bit of yellow "oil" build up while sitting in a tub so I thought it was too much butter. I reduced the butter and it still happens. The frosting has also started to sort of ooze greese, which I find odd. is it the crisco?

what is this HR frosting??? does that work?? oh, and how do you keep them cold with out a nasty refrigerator taste in the outside frosting??

indydebi Posted 6 Jun 2011 , 11:27am
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikel79

I have heard that Crisco does not have the trans fat needed for a good bc recipe.


This change took place about 5 years ago, so the zero trans fat is not a new thing. I believe it depends on the recipe because I use nothing but crisco and my icing works well in all temps, humidity and uses. I never even noticed crisco had a formula change.

Air bubbles are caused by air trying to escape. the only time I've had these happen to me is when I rushed a cake and didn't let it settle properly. What I learned to do, when I knew I was rushing a cake, was to crumb coat it and then poked some pin holes into the sides. This was an escape for any air that would otherwise be trapped. If I was super rushing a cake, I'd ice it and poke some pin holes in the icing right away. Never had bubbles with these little tricks.

sweetartbakery Posted 6 Jun 2011 , 12:46pm

I've been poking my fondant cakes, but I'm afraid of what will happen when someone wants a plain cake and I don't have a decoration to distract from my pin hole! mine always settle overnight before the crumb coat.....

so you don't use butter at all in the frosting? i almost feel like butter is my issue because I see the yellowish greese build up when its packed in a clear tub (never noticed before because it was always in a bowl that I couldn't see through)

indydebi Posted 6 Jun 2011 , 1:24pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetartbakery

so you don't use butter at all in the frosting?


Nope. Here's my recipe: http://cakecentral.com/recipes/6992/indydebis-crisco-based-buttercream-icing

Here's a CCer's outdoor test on how it holds up: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-6873024.html#6873024

sweettreat101 Posted 6 Jun 2011 , 3:37pm

I had the same problem this weekend and I let my cakes sit overnight before decorating them. I even placed plates on top to help them settle. I use hi ratio so it didn't help me. Luckily for me I had to place gumpaste flowers on the cakes so it deflated the bubbles for me. I was just talking about cake farts with my mom as we were delivering the cakes. So frusterating. She thought it might be the humidity because it was high that day and I normally don't have problems.

carmijok Posted 6 Jun 2011 , 3:57pm

I don't have that problem and I always fill and ice frozen cakes with BC. I use a real butter based frosting...no shortening. I keep them in the fridge where they thaw slowly until delivery and then they come to room temp slowly. Not one has had a bubble form...and I've been to just about all the events I made the cakes for! The few I haven't been to are all friends and they would have told me if there was a problem.

WykdGud Posted 6 Jun 2011 , 4:14pm

When I saw the title, the first thing I thought was to add some Beano to the batter. Heh.

(Note: This a JOKE!)

sweetartbakery Posted 6 Jun 2011 , 4:45pm

oh no! this happens with high ratio too! crap! it was my last chance hope!
guess i'll have to try the all shortning route, but it just sounds yucky. i've read the reviews but just by decreasing the butter in mine, I get that yuck feel of grease!

carmijok Posted 6 Jun 2011 , 10:58pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetartbakery

oh no! this happens with high ratio too! crap! it was my last chance hope!
guess i'll have to try the all shortning route, but it just sounds yucky. i've read the reviews but just by decreasing the butter in mine, I get that yuck feel of grease!




Maybe you should change your butter. What kind are you using? Like I said earlier, I use an all butter BC and have never had any of the problems you mentioned. If your butter is separating and your icing is oozing pools of oil, and it never used to happen, perhaps your type of butter is to blame? Or...perhaps your butter is way too soft when you cream it. If it's melted in any way you will have problems.

I also refrigerate my BC cakes and they do not have a 'nasty refrigerator taste' because I make sure that it's clean and that no strong odor foods are inside. Boxes of baking soda are also present. My garage refrigerator is perfect for this. I cool between each layer of frosting I put on the cake. This way, I'm certain that the BC is solid, smooth and there is no air anywhere. Like I said, I've never had this problem--- and just I hope I never do!

sweetartbakery Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 1:04am

I have commercial bakery coolers and refrigeration that are to be used only with bakery products (so no garlic or bacon smells that linger) and we've still noticed the buttercream taking on a taste, yet only very slightly on the outside layer... so I guess that is out for me.
I do wonder if it is the butter though. We have commercial supply. Its never over 71 degrees in the shop, so it can't be too soft. I wonder if its just cheap butter though.... I didn't have this problem starting out when I did cakes from home and bought land-o-lakes at the store!!! never saw the odd oil leakage either. That is the oddest part of it all too me and the part that I blame the most! just can't be good!

LindaF144a Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 1:16am
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetartbakery

I have commercial bakery coolers and refrigeration that are to be used only with bakery products (so no garlic or bacon smells that linger) and we've still noticed the buttercream taking on a taste, yet only very slightly on the outside layer... so I guess that is out for me.
I do wonder if it is the butter though. We have commercial supply. Its never over 71 degrees in the shop, so it can't be too soft. I wonder if its just cheap butter though.... I didn't have this problem starting out when I did cakes from home and bought land-o-lakes at the store!!! never saw the odd oil leakage either. That is the oddest part of it all too me and the part that I blame the most! just can't be good!




The best way to test this is to make two batches of frosting and change out only the butter. Ice a cake with it and see what happens. Then you will know if it is your brand of butter that is the culprit.

sweetartbakery Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 1:23am

although I will try that, its easier said than done. the bubble doesn't always happen and when it does its always at a different time. sometimes its hours later, sometimes it takes 2 days... i thought it was fixed before and it took 3 weeks before I saw another one! its feels so hopeless. My customers love my frosting so I hate changing it on them all the time! guess i have to though!

travmand Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 1:54am

I've had this happen with layered cakes....but never a sheet cake. I'm thinking more of a settling issue?? Dunno? But it ticks ya off, doesn't it icon_evil.gif

sweetartbakery Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 3:21pm

Indydebbie- I just tried your frosting. I'm shocked that I am not getting the crisco-like mouth feel, but its really grainy... Any ideas, I followed the recipe. Is it the no-trans fat issue that I've read about?

LindaF144a Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 5:05pm

Can you define grainy?

When we talk about it here I think there are two grainy issues. One is where the PS does not taste like it is dissolved all the way, probably more like gritty than grainy. The other one is where the shortening and liquid seems to separate causing miniscule grainy like look to the BC. This is more noticeable when you are coloring the BC IMO.

But I am curious as to which grainy you are experiencing.

sweetartbakery Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 6:48pm

ok, its the gritty version! ha ha. I mixed and mixed, but didn't want to beat air into it. I've add a little more milk and left it sit on the counter. will mix it again later and force my staff to eat it. I hate frosting and cake so I'm not a good judge of flavor icon_smile.gif The grit, I did pick out though. I used 2% Milk, but followed everything else the same way!

sugarshack Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 6:54pm

I had one on a dummy cake iced in BC! there was a price sticker on the dummy right under the blowout, on the TOP surface of the dummy. Figure that one out!


This actually reinforced "MY" opinion that blow outs are not escaping air from the cake... it is an adherance problem of the icing to the surface of the cake... related to moisture.

Just my opinion, do not fuss at me please. thumbs_up.gif

sweetartbakery Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 7:11pm

sugarshack- I totally agree with you!!! I've noticed on the cakes where I see this, it seems like the cake is almost slightly wet under the frosting. For example, when you run your finger on the crumb coat it normally doesn't budge...then sometimes it almost smears... this is when I see the bubbles. YET, I have no idea how or why it only happens sometimes.

LindaF144a Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 9:16pm

I agree with sugarshack. I think it has something to do with crusting BC and moisture. I only get this problem when I use a crusting BC that contains shortening, not any other frosting. Also I only seem to get to get this problem also in warm weather, not when it is cool.

bobwonderbuns Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 9:29pm

I agree with some of the others, I've had this when I used the "new" Crisco but never when I've used the hi-ratio shortening buttercreams. I have also found that if the cake is too cold underneath, that has the same effect (it's worse when you cover a cold cake with fondant. Go ahead, ask me how I know THAT one!) icon_rolleyes.gif

Mikel79 Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 10:35pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarshack

I had one on a dummy cake iced in BC! there was a price sticker on the dummy right under the blowout, on the TOP surface of the dummy. Figure that one out!


This actually reinforced "MY" opinion that blow outs are not escaping air from the cake... it is an adherance problem of the icing to the surface of the cake... related to moisture.

Just my opinion, do not fuss at me please. thumbs_up.gif




100% agree Sharon!

I had a blow out on the cake at the bottom where my Foamcore board is. I remember having issue's with Glad-Press and Seal adhering to the side of the foamcore. For one reason or another a little part of the wrap was sticking out from the side. I didn't think to much of it. I just rubbed it down with my finger until it was in place. The next day there was a bulge bubble at the base the same spot where the press and seal was sticking out! Go figure!! =)

Michael

sweettreat101 Posted 7 Jun 2011 , 10:57pm

I plan on making my butter cream like Edna does this weekend and see if that works. I think it's to much air in the frosting created during mixing. Watch her video on how to make butter cream. She finishes mixing her butter cream by hand at the end. Doesn't hurt to give it a try. Her cakes are always so smooth.

sweetartbakery Posted 8 Jun 2011 , 11:03am

Made a batch of indydebbie's buttercream last night, and my own (which is like edna's). I'm going to try to make enough extra cakes to frost two different ones and watch what happens. I am blaming the butter though. I'll take a picture of the tub of buttercream to show you what is happening and what I think is the problem. I'm also going to be a dehumidifier!!!

has anyone seen with with an all crisco base? or is it always a combination of butter and crisco? I think I'm seeing a trend.

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