I Dont Have A Pan Big Enough For A Wedding Cake Help

Decorating By heater79 Updated 8 May 2011 , 10:15am by mmmmmmmmcake1954

heater79 Posted 4 May 2011 , 2:55am
post #1 of 21

Hi fellow cakers!!!!
I have a bit of a problem, I need to know if I can put 2 cakes together for a 12" square wedding cake, I also need a 10" The biggest pan i have is a 8"
the other one i have is a 12" round and a 9x13 pan. I am worried of the stability if there are 3 tiers on top of the 12'.....and would it look bad when you cut it???? Help Please If I have to buy a pan i will.....but $$ are a bit tight

20 replies
heater79 Posted 4 May 2011 , 2:55am
post #2 of 21

Oh the tiers are 12 10 8 6 square
Thanks

costumeczar Posted 4 May 2011 , 2:59am
post #3 of 21

I'd just buy the pans and not try to mess around with piecing cakes together...Do you have time to get them before you need to bake? Those aren't weird sizes, so you should be able to find them relatively easily.

Kristie925 Posted 4 May 2011 , 3:05am
post #4 of 21

I agree with PP. It would probably be more trouble than it's worth to try and configure those sizes using your current pans.
If you have time, wait for a 40% off coupon for Michael's or Hobby Lobby.

sillywabbitz Posted 4 May 2011 , 3:23am
post #5 of 21

I used a 6 inch square pan to make the 12 inch tier at the bottom of my avatar cake. 4 6 inch square cakes make a 12 inch square. I didn't worry about support because I used SPS. I alse used ganache to ice the entire bottom tier before covering it in fondant. It held up great. If my math isn't wrong, I think you can get a 10 inch square out of a 12 inch round. As long as you are cutting from one piece of cake I think it would be fine. I would want to "patch" cake together. Make a 10x10 template out of card stock and it should work.

sweettooth101 Posted 4 May 2011 , 3:25am
post #6 of 21

The lady in this video (you tube by expert village on how to frost a square cake) used foil pans something I never thought one could do.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MAVh8SHxZS8&feature=relmfu

SammieB Posted 4 May 2011 , 3:26am
post #7 of 21

You can usually go on Hobby Lobby's website for a 40% off coupon. Joann's also takes competitor coupons so you should be able to get a set of square 8 12 and 16" pans for around $25. The other sizes are not typically in those stores, but amazon has some fairly cheap. They are the Wilton Performance line, but I use mine all the time and love them.

Bettyviolet101 Posted 4 May 2011 , 3:33am
post #8 of 21

You don't have to wait for a micheal's coupon just type micheal's coupons 2011 and you can print any of them off! So fun I have save hundreds of dollars doing this icon_smile.gif Good luck!

Bettyviolet101 Posted 4 May 2011 , 3:34am
post #9 of 21

Sorry, type micheal's coupons 2011 into google is what I meant.

CWR41 Posted 4 May 2011 , 7:03am
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by sillywabbitz

If my math isn't wrong, I think you can get a 10 inch square out of a 12 inch round.




You can only get an 8" square from a 12" round. (diagonal measurement for 8" square is 11.31.)

To cut a 10" square from a round, you'd need a 15" round. (diagonal measurement for 10" square is 14.14.)

Sam_paggers Posted 4 May 2011 , 8:55am
post #11 of 21

If you have a local cake craft store they may also rent out pans (the one near me does)....might save some hassel and $$

sam
xx

Chonte Posted 4 May 2011 , 9:01am
post #12 of 21

i agree with everyone, just buy the pans. my local walmart carries wilton pans in singles and as sets. they are not to expensive and then you'll have them for next time. i mean can we ever have to many cake pans?

mmmmmmmmcake1954 Posted 4 May 2011 , 10:20am
post #13 of 21

In the past I have used a roasting pan (oblong) and then cut the cake to the required size, in my pics I had to make a 2 tier cake with a shoe to go on as the topper, the shoe I made in advance , but then realised that it needed to go onto at least an 8" cake, so I used a large roasting pan and got both the tiers out of the one pan. HTH icon_wink.gif

heater79 Posted 4 May 2011 , 1:18pm
post #14 of 21

Thanks so much for everyone's help!!! Unfortunately I like in a real small town, closest Walmart or Michaels is 2 hours away.....I dont drive icon_sad.gif
There are a few stores in town where i can buy pans, but only 1 store that carries anything over 8" and she is a specialty store so her prices are ridiculous.
I think I am going to bake them in the disposable pans and that way I can buy a roasting pan and just trim it down to size.
I am guessing if I use a pan that big i will need a heating core????
The last cake i did was 12"round and i used a flower nail for the heating core.
Thanks once again for everyone's help!!!!!

sillywabbitz Posted 4 May 2011 , 1:32pm
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Quote:
Originally Posted by sillywabbitz

If my math isn't wrong, I think you can get a 10 inch square out of a 12 inch round.



You can only get an 8" square from a 12" round. (diagonal measurement for 8" square is 11.31.)

To cut a 10" square from a round, you'd need a 15" round. (diagonal measurement for 10" square is 14.14.)




Dang I had a feeling my my math was going to be wrong. icon_redface.gif

Thank you for the correction.

Kellbella Posted 4 May 2011 , 1:37pm
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by heater79

Thanks so much for everyone's help!!! Unfortunately I like in a real small town, closest Walmart or Michaels is 2 hours away.....I dont drive icon_sad.gif
There are a few stores in town where i can buy pans, but only 1 store that carries anything over 8" and she is a specialty store so her prices are ridiculous.
I think I am going to bake them in the disposable pans and that way I can buy a roasting pan and just trim it down to size.
I am guessing if I use a pan that big i will need a heating core????
The last cake i did was 12"round and i used a flower nail for the heating core.
Thanks once again for everyone's help!!!!!




I wish you luck, but I think you should have made sure you had all the necessary equipment before you made the commitment to make a wedding cake that size. This is for someones wedding..you want it to be perfect! I would take the money you get from this cake ( I assume you are getting paid icon_wink.gif ) and use it to buy a set of pans.

genevieveyum Posted 4 May 2011 , 2:01pm
post #17 of 21

A heating core is a good idea, but if you're using disposable aluminum pans, you should make your own "magic strips" (I forget what they're really called) Take wet, but not dripping paper towels and wrap them in aluminum foil so you have a long strip and wrap this around your pan. This will help even out the heat. Definitely better to go bigger and then trim down to size if that's your only option. I'd have to have a wedding cake that was pieces together from scraps.

heater79 Posted 8 May 2011 , 12:25am
post #18 of 21

Well I searched all over town and the only thing i could find other than disposable pans was a good quality roasting pan....bottom of it is flat, no grooves to catch grease. It is quite large, so I am quite happy. Shouldn't have a problem now. Thanks everyone for your help.

heater79 Posted 8 May 2011 , 12:36am
post #19 of 21

Kellbella,
Thanks for the advice, but my brother in law and his new wife just eloped a week ago, no one knew and they are now having a small party here, in a week and i was asked to do the cake. I couldn't very well say no. I am sure I could have changed the design of the cake and told her all i have is round that size, but i hate to disappoint. Knowing there background and what they have gone through to get to this point, i didnt want to take away any of there day, and knew with a little brain scratching and some GREAT advice from the wonderful people here on CC, I would have the confidence I can pull it off, and give them what they want icon_smile.gif




Thanks To Everyone
Will Be Sure To Post Pics When Done!!!!!!

jules5000 Posted 8 May 2011 , 1:03am
post #20 of 21

Well for future reference, I would recommend that after you bake the cake and let it completely cool that you wrap it good in plastic wrap, then in heavy duty aluminum foil and let it freeze for about 24 hours. take it out let it thaw somewhat, and try to carve it. when it is completely thawed out, put a crumb coat on it and the rest should go ok. I feel for you girl. Good luck in the future.

I have another suggestion for you. This is what I did when I was first getting started because I did not have all the equipment that I needed. What I did was I would tell the person that since I was just getting started in the business and did not have all the equipment that the costs of the equipment that I needed for their cake that I did not have, plus 10.00 was all I was going to charge and of course then they knew that I needed the money up front to get the stuff I needed and all they would owe me was $10.00 once I delivered it. I also explained that I had had 4 courses through Wilton and knew how to do what they wanted, but no one had a problem with that. People were more than willing to give me business because I was gaining experience, gaining equipment and they were getting a big discount. They were all happy with my work. So you might consider going this route. I have quite a few pans and equpment now and I gain more stuff when I go to ICES Days of sharing. If you have pictures of previous cakes that you have done this also helps.

mmmmmmmmcake1954 Posted 8 May 2011 , 10:15am
post #21 of 21

heater don't forget to post your pics and good luck with the roasting pan thumbs_up.gif

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