Rikena34 Posted 3 May 2011 , 8:06pm
post #1 of

Hello,

I just ordered a set of square shaped Topsy Turvy Pans and I was told by a baker friend of mine that she was concerned about the cake baking evenly because the pans are slanted that one section may bake quicker than the other has anyone used them? And if so is this a problem??

Thank you!

17 replies
bydubois10 Posted 5 May 2011 , 10:27pm
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I ordered the same pans too, but can't seem to find out what temp to use or how long to bake. I hope you had some luck finding out, I would love to know too.

Rikena34 Posted 10 May 2011 , 7:58pm
post #3 of

I have not used them yet but will do a test run this weekend. I am going to do the cake at the end of the month so need to get started to see what happens. Will let you know know how it works out.

bydubois10 Posted 10 May 2011 , 8:19pm
post #4 of

Thanks for the reply. I posted the question about baking in the pans to Global Sugar on this site but have not heard back as of yet.If Alan from Global responds I will let you know. I did find the listing of how many cups of batter to use and the amount of servings for each pan, I found it on the Fat Daddio's site. If you need it let me know. I can't wait to find out the baking temp for the pans,I'm guessing it's going to be at a low temp.PLs let me know what you come up with and if I find out anything I will let you know. I would love to order the round pans too, but not until I find out how to use the sq ones. Thanks for all your help. Brenda

conchita Posted 12 May 2011 , 10:59pm
post #5 of

I had the same question thanks for the post

Wing-Ding Posted 12 May 2011 , 11:15pm
post #6 of

I've actually had to bake a cake with the pan slanted. Wasn't my plan, but as it turns out, when you use an oven you have never used before, you might want to measure it to make sure your cake pans will fit. Mine didn't, so when I closed the oven, the pan lifted on one end. I said why not?

I am also saying never again. The thicker portion came out great, but at the sacrifice of the thinner end. It was over cooked. I used a lower temp to try to ensure even cooking, but it just didn't work. I've seen the pans and have told myself never to buy them.

Besides, when you cut the cake yourself to make a topsy turvy cake, I think it's more fun because you have control over how "tospy-turvy" it is! You could make it a slight slant or a really extreme one.

Rikena34 Posted 24 May 2011 , 8:08pm
post #7 of

I actually found out that if you put in 2 heating core nails on the corner ends of the deeper side of the pan you can get the cake to cook evenly with out it over cooking on the shallow side. I also used a 325 temp on my oven since it tends to cook things quick. It just depends on your oven temp. It took about 1hr for a 6" pan. Another trick I think may also work would be to use the bake even heating straps around the pan. But I have not tested this method yet. I will let you all know if it also works. The angle on the pans is not as drastic as I would like but I think you can work with it by cutting off a little more cake for the effect. But over all I like the pans. The pound cake recipe I used came out easily out of the pan and it did not over cook the cake. Hope this helps.

maryvig Posted 10 Nov 2011 , 4:37am
post #8 of

Hope this helps....

http://www.fatdaddios.com/faq


Mad Dadder Baking Instructions
Please use the below information as general information on baking with the Mad Dadder pans:

6 round or square Bake at 325 degrees. Use a 1 to 2 flower nails in the deep end of the pan to act as a heat conductor. Fill pan with batter and bake. Float the flower nails with head of nail resting on the batter and nail pointing down. Remove nails after baking.

8 round or square Bake at 325 degrees. Use 2 flower nails in the deep end of the pan to act as a heat conductor. Fill pan with batter and bake. Float the flower nails with head of nail resting on the batter and nail pointing down. Remove nail after baking.

10 round or square Bake at 315 degrees. Use 2 to 3 flower nails in the deep end of the pan to act as a heat conductor. Fill pan with batter and bake. Float the flower nails with head of nail resting on the batter and nail pointing down. Remove nail after baking.

12 round or square Bake at 300 degrees. Use 3 to 4 flower nails or a heating core in the deep end of the pan to act as a heat conductor. Fill the pan with batter. Float the flower nails with head of nail resting on the batter and nail pointing down. If using a heating core (highly recommend), grease
the inside and outside of the heating core as you would a pan and place in the deep end of the pan facing up, floating on the batter. Fill the inside of heating core with batter. Remove nails or heating core after
baking. If using a heating core, use the cake from inside the heating core to plug the hole created by the removal of the heating core.

14 round or square - Bake at 285 to 300 degrees. Use 3 to 4 flower nails or a heating core in the deep end of the pan to act as a heat conductor. Fill the pan with batter. Float the flower nails with head of nail resting on the batter and nail pointing down. If using a heating core (highly recommend), grease the inside and outside of the heating core as you would a pan and place in the deep end of the pan facing up, floating on the batter. Fill the inside of heating core with batter. Remove nails or heating core after baking. If using a heating core, use the cake from inside the heating core to plug the hole created by the removal of the heating core.

We do not provide baking times as there are too many factors that affect the amount of time to bake in these pans (type of oven, recipe, etc.). We do know the baking times average 10 to 20 minutes longer than standard round or square pans. We recommend checking your cakes for doneness throughout
the baking cycle and documenting for future use in your oven.

If you wish to add height to your layers, you can bake additional regular round or square cake layers (in regular round or square pans) and add to the bottom of the Mad Dadder layer.

bukswife Posted 30 Nov 2012 , 11:50pm
post #9 of

how did your cake come out? i just purchased the round topsy turvy pans and plan on using them in a few weeks..what kind of cake did you use for your bottom tier? i know you have to dowel the tiers but did you also use a seperator between tiers> i am planning to use fondant..i'm a bit nervous about this ..

cakesbykathys Posted 2 Dec 2012 , 5:52pm

I used the topsy turvy pans and my cakes came out overdone at the sides and undercooked in the center I did not use a flower nail unfortunately and I baked at 325 I had to eventually bake round cakes and cut the slant myself maybe next  time I would try using the flower nail as a heat conductor and see what happens

remnant3333 Posted 2 Dec 2012 , 6:05pm

Don't think I will be buying these topsy turvy pans. They seem like they don't turn out too well. 
 

saapena Posted 2 Dec 2012 , 7:01pm

I received Petal Crafts Topsy Turvy Cake pans as a gift (from my dearest friend).  I have used them a few times and have not had any problems with the cake being overdone on the "short" side and I did not use flower nails or bake even strips.  I remember that I baked at a lower temp--300 or 325--and the cakes took much more time than a regular cake.  I also baked another cake to place on the bottom to give it a more "topsy turvy" look.  I like Petal Crafts pans.

Mirinda Posted 28 Feb 2013 , 9:00am

I put the heating core/nail in the cakes as the Fat Daddio directions said to do it. The heating core/nail sank and I had to dig them out of the cakes, resulting in two wasted cakes. The heating core/nail needs to be put in the bottom of the pan before filling with batter, then they can be removed without having to dig for them.

scotch Posted 24 Sep 2013 , 10:28pm

I have the topsy turvy pans.  I have a convection oven and I baked according to the directions given.  350 is 325 on a convection oven.  You might want to put a pan of water on the lowest rack to keep the humidity up.  cakes looked great and tasted delicious.

jhm5lmh Posted 20 Nov 2013 , 2:03pm

I usually find it is easier to bake the cake as normal and shape it using a large sharp knife. It sometimes mean wasted cake, however it bakes evenly and you can always use the cut offs for decorating.

ddaigle Posted 20 Nov 2013 , 2:27pm

I would never use these pans due to the uneven baking and I've also heard the angle is not steep enough.   If you make your cut in one swipe, and flip that piece up...there should be no waste and you will have a nice angle.

Inga1 Posted 24 Feb 2014 , 3:22pm

I have just bought a set of round topsy turvy pans from petal crafts. Here are some recipes and information on them. I have not tried them yet, but hope to be able to make a cake for the grand opening of my sons restaurant.

 

http://topsyturvycakepans.com/recipes.html

JAY1949 Posted 18 Nov 2014 , 8:36pm

Hi, most topsy turvy cake pans come with a metal foot to level them in the oven so that they bake evenly. if yours do not have any you can use anything metal to level it up.

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