Red Velvet Cake Crumbled

Baking By Cosima Updated 4 May 2011 , 11:33am by Divatologist

Cosima Posted 3 May 2011 , 4:25am
post #1 of 11

I'M NEW TO BAKING and this site has so inspired me.
I Made this cake today
http://cakecentral.com/recipes/7366/chef-stefs-southern-red-velvet-cake
followed the directions to a T
BUT here's the thing
When I turned it over the bottom stuck to the pan
what did I do wrong?
Did I not let it cool enough?
I should have used wax paper, huh?

My other concern for this is that I'm planning on making a three tier cake of this http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1482455 (I know not a beginners cake but I have a lil girl who requested it for her birthday) and I'm wondering if when I attached the gum paste waves would it crumble apart from the weight?

What are your thoughts and what would you change on this?
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10 replies
ramie7224 Posted 3 May 2011 , 4:41am
post #2 of 11

I never bake cakes without parchment in the bottom. I've broken too many coming out of the pan.

FromScratchSF Posted 3 May 2011 , 4:54am
post #3 of 11

I spray my pans with baker's release. Then line the bottom with parchment - NOT wax paper. Wax paper is not meant to be baked on.

I let my cakes sit in the pan for 10 minutes after coming out of the oven before trying to turn them out. The larger the cake, the longer it sits.

Good luck,

Jen

Divatologist Posted 3 May 2011 , 7:42am
post #4 of 11

Yay! My 1st post on my favorite cake! I love red velvet cake and have been making it since my teens (41 now). I'm old fashioned when it comes to baking. I still grease and flour my pans. I do however leave my cakes in the pan till they are completely cooled. I do this for all my cakes except my sock-it-to-me cake. I have a thing about dry cake. So what I do is let my cake cool down to where you can feel a slight amount of warmth on your hand as you hold it over your cake. I usually wait about 30 mins before I start checking. At this time I take press and seal wrap and poke small holes in it with a toothpick. Not a whole lot of holes. Just enough to vent slightly. I cover the cake with the press and seal wrap. What this does is keep my cakes moist (warmth) right to the edge. I leave them covered overnight. I've never had a problem with my cakes sticking. I run a plastic knife along the sides of the cake and slap the side of the pan hard until the cake comes loose. I flip it right out with no problem. I use the regular nonstick pans. I have this same recipe. I always use extra buttermilk and oil. I also add 2 tablespoons on cocoa powder (Hershey). I just bought some Pernigotti cocoa powder. Can't wait to try that in my recipe. Good luck with your next cake. Let us know how it turns out.

JanH Posted 3 May 2011 , 7:48am
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

I spray my pans with baker's release. Then line the bottom with parchment - NOT wax paper. Wax paper is not meant to be baked on.




True, but it is a satisfactory substitution when baking cakes - as long as the wax paper is completely covered with batter:
(So no, it wouldn't be a satisfactory substitute for parchment if baking cookies.)

http://www.ehow.com/how_8041701_substitute-wax-paper-parchment-paper.html

http://www.ochef.com/304.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wax_paper

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Can_wax_paper_be_baked

HTH

Cosima Posted 3 May 2011 , 12:24pm
post #6 of 11

WOW Great information, THANKS!

Quote:
Quote:

Divatologist : I always use extra buttermilk and oil. I also add 2 tablespoons on cocoa powder (Hershey).



Would this help make my cake more dense? I'm concerned while making this cake here http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1482455 that it will crumble apart. It shouldn't tho if I wrap the full cake in fondant? What do you think?[/quote]

FromScratchSF Posted 3 May 2011 , 3:17pm
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

I spray my pans with baker's release. Then line the bottom with parchment - NOT wax paper. Wax paper is not meant to be baked on.



True, but it is a satisfactory substitution when baking cakes - as long as the wax paper is completely covered with batter:
(So no, it wouldn't be a satisfactory substitute for parchment if baking cookies.)

http://www.ehow.com/how_8041701_substitute-wax-paper-parchment-paper.html

http://www.ochef.com/304.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wax_paper

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Can_wax_paper_be_baked

HTH




Although these articles mention that you could use wax paper, what they don't mention is the wax melting into your cake and making it very hard to peel the paper off the cake once it's out of the pan, and if the cake is cool at all you can't get the paper off without pulling your cake apart because the wax re-sets. Even if you can get the paper off, you will have a layer of wax on your cake and cake pans.

So yeah, technically you could use it, but I don't know why you'd suggest it's OK to use as a substitute to a new person that is having problems getting their cake to release... the correct paper to line a cake pan with is parchment.

JanH Posted 4 May 2011 , 12:25am
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

So yeah, technically you could use it, but I don't know why you'd suggest it's OK to use as a substitute to a new person that is having problems getting their cake to release... the correct paper to line a cake pan with is parchment.




Well, I've used waxed paper for baking cakes when I didn't have or didn't even know about "parchment paper" and the cake layers came out fine.

Just as you can't let the cake layers cool in the pan so the cake grease sets up and acts like glue, so you should peel off the wax paper while the layers are still warm. icon_smile.gif

Even Betty Crockers advises the use of waxed paper in current cake recipes:

http://m.bettycrocker.com/recipes/mint-chocolate-ice-cream-cake/6c3a82ea-b6cd-4ae7-a0cb-4faa239abdf8?parent=%7B0E896168-9BE2-4FF6-9FBD-73C533A5CB51%7D

As does Duncan Hines:

http://www.duncanhines.com/baking-tips/cakes/rohslan/baking-a-level-cake

And Pillsbury:

http://www.pillsbury.com/recipes/mint-chocolate-ice-cream-cake/ea3ceed8-8c13-4759-ab7e-3ece290126b9/

And even Martha Stewart:

http://www.marthastewart.com/256309/mrs-mauss-fruitcake-from-entertaining

Sangriacupcake Posted 4 May 2011 , 1:30am
post #9 of 11

I line my pans with parchment..........however...............

My grandma lined every cake she ever baked with wax paper!!! She baked several times per week until she was about 85 years old. icon_smile.gif

JanH Posted 4 May 2011 , 6:54am
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sangriacupcake

She baked several times per week until she was about 85 years old. icon_smile.gif




How great is that. icon_biggrin.gifthumbs_up.gif

I hope I can continue baking until I'm about 85 yoa. birthday.gif

Divatologist Posted 4 May 2011 , 11:33am
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosima

WOW Great information, THANKS!

Quote:
Quote:

Divatologist : I always use extra buttermilk and oil. I also add 2 tablespoons on cocoa powder (Hershey).


Would this help make my cake more dense? I'm concerned while making this cake here http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1482455 that it will crumble apart. It shouldn't tho if I wrap the full cake in fondant? What do you think?


[/quote]

The only crumbs I get are the ones left from the pan when I flip the cake out. I usually just brush those off. However, I am not a professional baker. I just make regular cakes for family and friends. I haven't a clue of how to decorate a cake. So I don't do all that fancy stuff. I just add a light layer of frosting around the the outside of the cake layers before I frost the cake. I use a cream cheese and pecan frosting on my red velvet. I am now trying to get use to my new cooking pans (calphalon) I just bought. The cakes came out moist and fluffy in my old cheap pans. My cakes come out moist, but a bit more dense in the new pans. There aren't many crumbs when flip the cakes out. I can't really tell you what may happen with the fondant.

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