Disco Dust On Fondant

Decorating By Hyperactive Updated 4 May 2011 , 3:01am by Coral3

Hyperactive Posted 2 May 2011 , 8:17pm
post #1 of 10

I want to apply disco dust to the "sides" of my cake on the fondant but not sure how to get it on there without airbrushing it since I don't have one. From what I have read, using a wet brush will make it clump and a dry brush might not get enough on there. Any ideas?

9 replies
MamaMia808 Posted 2 May 2011 , 9:02pm
post #2 of 10

I normally use water or lemon extract or vodka to apply disco dust. BUT I also never use disco dust on a decoration that is meant to be eaten since it isn't "edible." I normally use it only on decorations that will be removed before the cake is eaten.

jo3d33 Posted 2 May 2011 , 9:24pm
post #3 of 10

I just put it on some gumpaste letters I did last weekend. I wet the gumpaste with a brush and then poured the disco dust over them and shook off the excess. I have also put it on a tea pot using water. It didnt clump up. It worked great. I have only used it a few times, but it hasnt been too hard.

Cake_Karen Posted 2 May 2011 , 9:27pm
post #4 of 10

I use an edible disco dust on my cake and apply it by using dipping solution or clear alcohol.
If you use water on a fondant it will go all sticky and not look good IMO

BlakesCakes Posted 2 May 2011 , 10:42pm
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cake_Karen

I use an edible disco dust on my cake and apply it by using dipping solution or clear alcohol.
If you use water on a fondant it will go all sticky and not look good IMO




Actually, disco dust isn't edible--it's non-toxic. It's fine particle PLASTIC craft glitter for decoration only (to be used on items that will be removed before serving).

There is edible glitter, though. It's made from gum arabic and it will "melt" using water:

http://www.coppergifts.com/cookie-cutters/pc/Edible-Glitter-p1858.htm

I've had good luck grinding it fine using a tea strainer and the handle of a spatula and then spraying the fondant with clear drinking alcohol. Most of it will stick.

Rae

reginaherrin Posted 3 May 2011 , 1:24am
post #6 of 10

I am so ordering that stuff. I have been wanting to use disco dust but was told it is not edible, which does not make sense since it is sold for cake decorating. But I see so many cake shows that use it for cakes and don't understand why. So I hope this glitter is a good alternative. Can you paint it on with alcohol or brush it on like pearl dust?

BlakesCakes Posted 3 May 2011 , 5:14pm
post #7 of 10

The fact that disco dust is marketed to cake decorators makes no sense to me either.

I have a theory that I believe has reasonable roots. The first disco dusts I ever saw were brought to the US from England and from a company called "Edable Art"--it's a play on the owner's name, Ed, and you can see that the word edible is misspelled. The company does make many, many wonderful, fully edible cake deco products.

I think it got misinterpreted, too, and here we are a few years later, trying to debunk the idea that it's an edible product.

Real, edible glitter MELTS in the presence of water, piping gel, corn syrup, etc. I have found that if I spray an area with clear drinking alcohol--vodka, Everclear, white rum--and immediately sprinkle on the edible glitter, I can get a nice adherence. If you add some fine sanding sugar to it, it adds to the sparkle

Please understand, there is no readily available edible product that can give you the same shine as high polish plastic craft glitter.

Sequins & sugar are just 2 very different things.

Rae

Coral3 Posted 4 May 2011 , 2:43am
post #8 of 10

Direct from Rainbow Dust's website: (from this page http://www.rainbowdust.co.uk/page_info.php?pages_id=1&pages_name=Food Safety&osCsid=83951fed2a8e8080405b2ecc175c94d9 )

Quote:
Quote:

NON TOXIC GLITTERS (NON-TOXIC - not harmful) The Sparkle Range

Non toxic glitters can be used on decorations that are easily removed. If consumed, then the product will cause no harm and will simply pass through the digestive system. This product can not be classed as edible as this would mean it is digestible and is classed as a food, therefore we simply have to label it as Non-Toxic




Personally I don't have a problem using it lightly on parts of a cake that will get eaten. And if youve used it before youll realise how a tiny, tiny amount of it goes a very long way...so to make a whole cake glittery with it you only use the smallest amount, then when the cake is served each person gets only a fraction of that smallest amount - its not like theyre going to sit down and consume a whole pot of the stuff! Its not technically 'edible' because it doesn't get absorbed by the body during digestion...that does not mean it is harmful. There are plenty who would disagree with my opinion...they have a right to their own opinion. It's something you need to make your own mind up on.

BlakesCakes Posted 4 May 2011 , 2:52am
post #9 of 10

Of course, everyone is responsible for, and entitled to, their own opinion.

I posted what is below to one of the myriad postings about disco dust.

"The concept that lots of small plastic particles aren't harmful is an over-generalization.

People with diverticulitis or diverticulosis, Crohn's disease, IBS, etc. have to be very careful about consuming things that can stick in the creases of the intestinal lining--think strawberry seeds, kiwi seeds, nonpareils, etc.

Seeds don't digest easily and plastic doesn't digest at all. If those small things get stuck in that lining--even in a healthy person--serious infection can result.

Since fine plastic particles aren't something that the average person would even imagine would be on the food their eating, someone who is ordinarily very careful about their diet might be caught off guard.

Fact is, no one should have ever decided to put the stuff on food to begin with. Sometimes, "pretty" just isn't worth it. "

Rae

Coral3 Posted 4 May 2011 , 3:01am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyperactive

I want to apply disco dust to the "sides" of my cake on the fondant but not sure how to get it on there without airbrushing it since I don't have one. From what I have read, using a wet brush will make it clump and a dry brush might not get enough on there. Any ideas?




If you can steam the sides of the cake lightly that will make the fondant a little bit sticky so the disco dust will adhere. To get an even, light application of disco dust dip a dry paintbrush in the glitter and either shake it above the tilted (so the disco dust will actually fall onto the sides) cake. If you're not able to tilt the cake then you can hold the brush and if you have something to squeeze a puff of air onto the brush it will blow the glitter over the sides of the cake. To get an even, light application of disco dust don't hold the paintbrush too close to the fondant surface.

You could also sprinkle disco dust lightly over the surface of the fondant after rolling it out give one last quick roll over to press the glitter into the fondant and make it stay put, then cover the cake as normal.

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