Shortening Buttercream That's Not Crisco

Baking By JessicakesBakes Updated 10 May 2011 , 4:34pm by JessicakesBakes

JessicakesBakes Posted 1 May 2011 , 1:22am
post #1 of 25

I just had a yummy cupcake with a great Frosting. I asked the lady who had brought them about it. I was able to get it out of her that is was shortening based but that she died not use Crisco. This did not have that greasy shortening feel. Is there a better shortening out there? I feel so new to all of this.....

She was really not willing to spill her secrets....i guess I'm the competition.... But I know someone here will share.
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24 replies
sugarlover Posted 1 May 2011 , 1:33am
post #2 of 25

It could be Sweetex shortening!

JessicakesBakes Posted 1 May 2011 , 1:49am
post #3 of 25

Is sweetex hi-ratio? Maybe I dont really know what that means......hi-ratio, I mean.

10xHigh Posted 1 May 2011 , 2:34am
post #4 of 25

Jess that is Hi ratio...once you use it you will never use anything else...its the next best thing to real old fashioned butter cream made with unsalted butter, cream and 10x...Your questions are always welcome...

jason_kraft Posted 1 May 2011 , 2:48am
post #5 of 25

In CA it is illegal to use Sweetex shortening when making baked goods for sale due to the trans fat ban. There is an alternative called Sweetex Z made without trans fats, for buttercream it works similarly to regular Sweetex but it is softer and more temperature sensitive.

Of course you can still use Sweetex for personal use as long as you are not charging for the cake, but it is only available in 50 lb blocks.

bostonterrierlady Posted 1 May 2011 , 2:51am
post #6 of 25

Where do you get Sweetex Z?

jason_kraft Posted 1 May 2011 , 2:53am
post #7 of 25

We buy Sweetex Z directly from BakeMark, a national distributor that offers cash & carry if you call in advance.

http://www.yourbakemark.com/contact/branches.html

You can also find it online at the link below, but shipping would probably be pretty expensive.

http://www.foodservicedirect.com/product.cfm/p/155608/Ach-Food-Sweetex-Cake-and-Icing-Shortening-50-Pound.htm

indydebi Posted 1 May 2011 , 12:32pm
post #8 of 25

It could be the difference in the recipes. I've gotten feedback that my crisco-based icing doesnt' taste greasy. but I've made icing (different recipe) in which all I could taste was the shortening. I was immediately grateful that I KNEW a crisco-based icing could taste great. If my only exposure had been that crappy recipe, I'd never make crisco icing ever.

Logically, the more shortening in the recipe, the more shortening you will taste.

So it may or may not be the shortening brand. It may be the recipe.

LindaF144a Posted 1 May 2011 , 7:41pm
post #9 of 25

You can also use Spectrum Organic shortening. It is made with palm oil and NOT soybean oil. I find that I can tell the difference between those two in taste. It took me a long time to realize this was the difference, at least for me.

jason_kraft Posted 1 May 2011 , 7:49pm
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

You can also use Spectrum Organic shortening. It is made with palm oil and soybean oil. I find that I can tell the difference between those two in taste. It took me a long time to realize this was the difference, at least for me.



Spectrum Organic shortening is actually 100% palm oil, we use it to make dairy-free and soy-free buttercream frosting.

Interestingly enough, Sweetex Z is also 100% palm oil. It performs similarly to Spectrum Organic shortening for about half the cost (if you can buy in bulk of course).

LindaF144a Posted 1 May 2011 , 8:18pm
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

You can also use Spectrum Organic shortening. It is made with palm oil and soybean oil. I find that I can tell the difference between those two in taste. It took me a long time to realize this was the difference, at least for me.


Spectrum Organic shortening is actually 100% palm oil, we use it to make dairy-free and soy-free buttercream frosting.

Interestingly enough, Sweetex Z is also 100% palm oil. It performs similarly to Spectrum Organic shortening for about half the cost (if you can buy in bulk of course).




Yes, you are right! I forgot one word, but it was an important word! I changed it.

Interesting to know about Sweetex Z. I'll have to get my hands on some and try it. In the meantime, Spectrum is easier to get here than Sweetex, so I can use that until I get some.

Sangriacupcake Posted 1 May 2011 , 9:01pm
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144a

You can also use Spectrum Organic shortening. It is made with palm oil and soybean oil. I find that I can tell the difference between those two in taste. It took me a long time to realize this was the difference, at least for me.


Spectrum Organic shortening is actually 100% palm oil, we use it to make dairy-free and soy-free buttercream frosting.

Interestingly enough, Sweetex Z is also 100% palm oil. It performs similarly to Spectrum Organic shortening for about half the cost (if you can buy in bulk of course).




That's interesting....so why would anyone want to buy Sweetex Z? Does Sw. Z have those miraculous emulsifiers that make icings so creamy, or is that only possible with trans fats? I have used Spectrum Organics in baking with good results (in fact, I just made some donut muffins with it!) but never thought to use it in icing.

jason_kraft Posted 1 May 2011 , 9:16pm
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sangriacupcake

That's interesting....so why would anyone want to buy Sweetex Z? Does Sw. Z have those miraculous emulsifiers that make icings so creamy, or is that only possible with trans fats? I have used Spectrum Organics in baking with good results (in fact, I just made some donut muffins with it!) but never thought to use it in icing.



Trans-fat free emulsifiers do exist...I don't know enough about how Sweetex Z is made to say what the difference is, but since it is still marketed as high-ratio shortening they presumably include some kind of emulsifying agent when they process the palm oil.

The main reason I buy Sweetex Z is because Sweetex cannot be used for commercial food products in CA due to the trans fat ban. If you're talking about Sweetex Z vs. Spectrum, Sweetex Z is much cheaper for those who buy in bulk.

EDIT: I just looked it up and Sweetex Z contains mono and diglycerides as emulsifying agents in addition to the palm oil, so it's not technically 100% palm oil like Spectrum. From what I've read, only a small amount of mono and diglycerides are necessary to achieve an emulsifying effect, so the shortening falls under the 0.5g/serving threshold for trans fats and thus qualifies as a trans fat-free ingredient.

Here is a PDF put together to help restaurants in NYC eliminate trans fats, it has a lot of great info:
http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/transfat/english/shorteninglist.pdf

Sangriacupcake Posted 1 May 2011 , 9:36pm
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sangriacupcake

That's interesting....so why would anyone want to buy Sweetex Z? Does Sw. Z have those miraculous emulsifiers that make icings so creamy, or is that only possible with trans fats? I have used Spectrum Organics in baking with good results (in fact, I just made some donut muffins with it!) but never thought to use it in icing.


Trans-fat free emulsifiers do exist...I don't know enough about how Sweetex Z is made to say what the difference is, but since it is still marketed as high-ratio shortening they presumably include some kind of emulsifying agent when they process the palm oil.

The main reason I buy Sweetex Z is because Sweetex cannot be used for commercial food products in CA due to the trans fat ban. If you're talking about Sweetex Z vs. Spectrum, Sweetex Z is much cheaper for those who buy in bulk.

EDIT: I just looked it up and Sweetex Z contains mono and diglycerides as emulsifying agents in addition to the palm oil, so it's not technically 100% palm oil like Spectrum.

Here is a PDF put together to help restaurants in NYC eliminate trans fats, it has a lot of great info:
http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/transfat/english/shorteninglist.pdf




Thank you. I read your previous post wrong...thought you were saying Spectrum was cheaper. I'm not in CA, but I know the ban of transfats is coming everywhere. I just don't know what I'm going to do when Sweetex is no longer available to me, because my icing is sooooo much smoother and easier to work with since I started using Sweetex, and it holds up in the heat for outdoor events. I love to work with butter whenever possible, but sometimes it's just not practical. I'm not a pro--just an avid hobbyist who bakes and decorates cakes for anyone who'll let me!

Thanks for the link, too. icon_smile.gif

JessicakesBakes Posted 1 May 2011 , 9:42pm
post #15 of 25

Thank you everyone for all of this feedback and information! Since I know this girl was for sure not using Crisco, and since we also live in CA, AND since I know where she does most of her supply shopping I am pretty sure I can narrow it down. And I think I will keep trying some other recipes. I love way you can decorate with the Wilton BC recipe, but I can't stand to eat it and I have tried SMBC and it's just too buttery for me. I love the flavor of CC frotings, but you can't use them for everything. I know the perfect middle grounds exists. Trial and error and lots and lots of practice!!

JessicakesBakes Posted 1 May 2011 , 10:34pm
post #16 of 25

Has anyone used the Kitchen Krafts brand?

calicopurr Posted 1 May 2011 , 10:45pm
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

It could be the difference in the recipes. I've gotten feedback that my crisco-based icing doesnt' taste greasy. but I've made icing (different recipe) in which all I could taste was the shortening. I was immediately grateful that I KNEW a crisco-based icing could taste great. If my only exposure had been that crappy recipe, I'd never make crisco icing ever.

Logically, the more shortening in the recipe, the more shortening you will taste.

So it may or may not be the shortening brand. It may be the recipe.



I've been avoiding Crisco, but if you say you do use the new Crisco (no trans fat), then what kind of powdered sugar do you us Debi? I ask because I used the new Crisco and Walmart powdered sugar (not your recipe) and it was gritty. I didn't know what ingredient to blame. Right now, I'm using a Kroger vegetable shortening and the Walmart p.sugar and there's no grittiness. But if I was to go healthier and switch to Crisco, I'd definitely pay more for sugar cane p.sugar like C and H.

indydebi Posted 1 May 2011 , 10:52pm
post #18 of 25

calico, I use Domino sugar and I've used Walmart sugar. I also use the brand sold by Sam's (Chef something?). I always sift the p.sugars. I've used nothing but Crisco for 30 years.

jason_kraft Posted 2 May 2011 , 12:12am
post #19 of 25

We've found no difference in terms of taste or texture between different brands of powdered sugar, including beet vs. cane sugar (we use only beet sugar when customers are strict vegans, since cane sugar is processed with animal bone char).

If you are getting gritty frosting it probably has to do with the process rather than the ingredients.

JessicakesBakes Posted 2 May 2011 , 3:06pm
post #20 of 25

Does anyone know where Sweetex Z can be purchased in the So Cal area? And in quanities smaller than 50#? I did find some hi-ratio in a 3# on KitchenKrafts.com but it is labeled as their brand.

JessicakesBakes Posted 2 May 2011 , 8:30pm
post #21 of 25

I just got my hands on some BakeMark Hi-Ration shortening. I can't wait to try it!!

JessicakesBakes Posted 9 May 2011 , 5:21pm
post #22 of 25

OMG! What a difference!! I am sure that some here can make the perfect buttercream with butter, or the perfect buttercream with Crisco, but for me - HI RATIO SHORTENING is awesome! I feel like a kid on Christmas! I made a cake for Mother's Day and was so nervous to try this frosting. Another buttercream that I was so afraid we would all hate - (I haven't been having much luck!)

It was great! I used some lemon and Butavan (It was a white cake filled with lemon curd) and it was smooth, yummy, crusted nicely and wasn't too sweet. THANKS for sharing the hi ratio secret!!!

jason_kraft Posted 9 May 2011 , 5:31pm
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by JessicakesBakes

I just got my hands on some BakeMark Hi-Ration shortening. I can't wait to try it!!



Where did you buy this shortening, was it branded as BakeMark or BakeSense? Does it contain trans fat?

TexasSugar Posted 10 May 2011 , 3:39pm
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by calicopurr

I've been avoiding Crisco, but if you say you do use the new Crisco (no trans fat), then what kind of powdered sugar do you us Debi? I ask because I used the new Crisco and Walmart powdered sugar (not your recipe) and it was gritty. I didn't know what ingredient to blame. Right now, I'm using a Kroger vegetable shortening and the Walmart p.sugar and there's no grittiness. But if I was to go healthier and switch to Crisco, I'd definitely pay more for sugar cane p.sugar like C and H.




When using store brand sugars it can be made from beet sugar rather than pure cane and that can cause the grittiness in the buttercream. My GV brand was made with pure cane forever but in the last year they switch back to beet sugar.

I do wonder though, when we will stop calling Crisco the "new" Crisco. Crisco changes it's formula about 4 to 5 years ago.*

*Okay I just looked it up, and the posts about it started appearing in the spring/summer of 2007.

JessicakesBakes Posted 10 May 2011 , 4:34pm
post #25 of 25

I got it at Calico Cakes in Buena Park. They said it is Bake Mark, but they repackage it into 3lb packs. I don't know about the transfat, but as a hobby baker its not so important to me.

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