Foxicakes Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 7:17pm
post #1 of

I have been studying cakes for a while now and have been watching the different styles. But, for the life of me, I can't figure out how you Aussies get your fondant cakes SO perfect looking!!! I mean, I know that you all use ganache under the fondant, but certainly that can't be the only thing that you are doing different than the rest of us.... What type of fondant do you ladies use?? Are there other "tricks" or products that you use there that we can't get without having to order it from an Aussie distributor? For an idea of the types of cakes I am talking about, I am attaching some photos that I found on the Flickr site made by several Australian cakers.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/28759693@N04/5588018259/in/photostream

http://www.flickr.com/photos/28759693@N04/5671404311/in/photostream
http://www.flickr.com/photos/deliciously_decadent/5518357783/in/photostream

Again, none of the cakes are my own creation. The first two are by "My Cakes.com" and the third one is by a designer that goes by the name "Deliciously Decadent" but they all show the type of perfection with fondant that I'm striving to achieve in my own decorating. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated!!

20 replies
ApplegumPam Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 10:39pm
post #2 of

Most Aussies use Bakels Pettinice ( I know DD does) but we have just had Satin Ice hit our shores and lots of people are trying that out, with mixed reviews.

MOST of us are making mudcakes - a much denser cake that the American style of light fluffy with fruit filling etc.

Our cakes are normally filled with ganache as well (think it acts a bit like reinforcement, especially in carved cakes

I posted a few links to covering a cake with ganache and sharp edge (Aussie style) on another thread - Ganache Torture .... hang on I'll go grab them

ApplegumPam Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 10:44pm
post #3 of

90% of Australian made cakes are ganache under fondant

Fondant is rolled REALLY thin - most aiming for 1/8th of an inch or less these days.

This is a really good photo step by step of a class taken with Faye Cahill in Sydney - http://www.fayecahill.com.au/Wedding/wedding.htm


Tutorial

http://www.notquitenigella.com/2010/11/04/how-to-make-a-two-tier-wedding-cake-with-faye-cahill/




ANOTHER set of tutorials by another talented Aussie
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFtm8q4m4Bk
http://www.youtube.com/user/InspiredByMichelle#p/u/4/OgrXxYLm0Sk
http://www.youtube.com/user/InspiredByMichelle#p/u/3/imfDvvSZn5I


ENJOY!!!!

LisaPeps Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 11:06pm
post #4 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by ApplegumPam

90% of Australian made cakes are ganache under fondant

Fondant is rolled REALLY thin - most aiming for 1/8th of an inch or less these days.

This is a really good photo step by step of a class taken with Faye Cahill in Sydney - http://www.fayecahill.com.au/Wedding/wedding.htm


Tutorial

http://www.notquitenigella.com.....ye-cahill/




These two links didn't work, could you repost if possible please?

bobwonderbuns Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 11:27pm
post #5 of

Agreed, it's the ganache under the fondant. Works like a charm! icon_biggrin.gif

cutiepiecupcake Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 11:47pm
post #6 of

I have to agree with ApplegumPam.. the density of the mud cake and the ganache combinded act as a wonderful stabilizing componant. Michelle from Inspired By Michelle Cake Designs mentions this fact I think during her youtube tutorial.. you can see how stable the cakes are when she is moving around them with her fondant smoother. Here is Michelle's response to a similiar question that was posted on her site: http://inspired-by-chocolate-and-cakes.com/index.php?mact=News,cntnt01,detail,0&cntnt01articleid=69&cntnt01origid=73&cntnt01returnid=57

HTH

Motorhead Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 11:48pm
post #7 of

i've tried the links as well and they are broken. PLEASE repost the links as i am extremely curious and envious of the obvious talent!! thumbs_up.gif

cutiepiecupcake Posted 1 May 2011 , 12:09am
post #8 of

ApplegumPam Faye's cakes are amazing! So elegant and divine to look at.

Anyone trying to click on the links I would advise just to type in the main website name and search the site from there icon_smile.gif

Coral3 Posted 1 May 2011 , 12:09am
post #9 of

There's an Australian book called Planet Cake by Paris Cutler. That has good basic instructions for using ganache under fondant and getting sharp edges.

I agree with others that most of the cakes you are referring to would be mud cakes (a dense, very stable cake) with ganache (again, very stable & a great solid surface to cover with fondant), and that fondant is rolled thin (about 3 or 4mm, no thicker). If you're using mud cake and the right consistency ganache (for filling as well as frosting) you will get ZERO bulging problems, and the cake won't need time to 'settle' at all - you can go right ahead and ice all over after filling, no problems. You do need to give the ganache time to set up before covering with fondant though. The very sharpest edges rely on good smoothing technique as well, using two smoothers simultaneously - I can't quite get that right yet, which is why my edges are not as sharp as those in your links.

audrey0522 Posted 1 May 2011 , 12:27am

Thank you for the advice. I have never tried Ganache but hope to soon. Would you mind sharing your recipe for mud cake? I need to get out of my box - as a hobby baker I tend to just make the basic WASC.

cutiepiecupcake Posted 1 May 2011 , 1:01am
Quote:
Originally Posted by audrey0522

Thank you for the advice. I have never tried Ganache but hope to soon. Would you mind sharing your recipe for mud cake? I need to get out of my box - as a hobby baker I tend to just make the basic WASC.




Check out some of these recipes. Her chocolate cake is eggless and is dense, moist and YUMMY thumbs_up.gif http://inspired-by-chocolate-and-cakes.com/chocolate-recipes.html

ApplegumPam Posted 1 May 2011 , 1:30am

All links above have been edited and should now work icon_biggrin.gif

I just cut and paste from a previous post and didnt' realise they were 'condensed' links icon_sad.gif

ApplegumPam Posted 1 May 2011 , 1:32am

I posted a copy of my recipe on here ages ago

Here is a link
http://cakecentral.com/recipes/14688/pams-chocolate-mudcake

lilmissbakesalot Posted 1 May 2011 , 2:10am

You don't *have* to use ganache. I use swiss meringue buttercream and butter cakes and get super sharp corners.

Image

I've done it with criscocream too, but it's much more of a hassle.

A buttercream made with butter will chill and get nice and firm so you can apply the right pressure to it.

Coral3 Posted 1 May 2011 , 2:16am
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilmissbakesalot

You don't *have* to use ganache. I use swiss meringue buttercream and butter cakes and get super sharp corners.

Image

I've done it with criscocream too, but it's much more of a hassle.

A buttercream made with butter will chill and get nice and firm so you can apply the right pressure to it.




Gorgeous cake lilmissbakesalot! icon_biggrin.gif

cutiepiecupcake Posted 1 May 2011 , 2:42am

Gorgeous cake lilmissbakesalot.. is that SMB under fondant? or just SMB alone? Either way, you have acheived perfection icon_wink.gif

Holdoll Posted 1 May 2011 , 2:46am
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilmissbakesalot

You don't *have* to use ganache. I use swiss meringue buttercream and butter cakes and get super sharp corners.

Image

I've done it with criscocream too, but it's much more of a hassle.

A buttercream made with butter will chill and get nice and firm so you can apply the right pressure to it.





Oh my goodness, I LOVE this cake! thumbs_up.gif

Evoir Posted 1 May 2011 , 2:50am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxicakes

I have been studying cakes for a while now and have been watching the different styles. But, for the life of me, I can't figure out how you Aussies get your fondant cakes SO perfect looking!!! I mean, I know that you all use ganache under the fondant, but certainly that can't be the only thing that you are doing different than the rest of us.... What type of fondant do you ladies use?? Are there other "tricks" or products that you use there that we can't get without having to order it from an Aussie distributor? For an idea of the types of cakes I am talking about, I am attaching some photos that I found on the Flickr site made by several Australian cakers.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/28759693@N04/5588018259/in/photostream

http://www.flickr.com/photos/28759693@N04/5671404311/in/photostream
http://www.flickr.com/photos/deliciously_decadent/5518357783/in/photostream

Again, none of the cakes are my own creation. The first two are by "My Cakes.com" and the third one is by a designer that goes by the name "Deliciously Decadent" but they all show the type of perfection with fondant that I'm striving to achieve in my own decorating. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated!!






Foxi, the opther thing too is that Australian decorators were the first in the world to really adopt fondant as the preferred cake covering for high;y decorated cakes. We have a long history of using the stuff! Back in the early days we would need it to 'seal' the fruit cakes which used to be used mainly for decorated special occasion cakes - including as a stable base for RI piped stringwork etc.

I have been using commercial fondants for over 25 years. The one I use nowadays is NOT regarded as the easiest to work with - its the Pettinince that Applegum mentioned. I have tried the Satin Ice ("AS USED BY CAKE BOSS!!!!!!") and can't use it straight - I have to blend it with my Pettinince to get it workable for me. But I do think a bit of Satin Ice improveds the cracking issues one can encounter when working with Pettinince too long. Overall though, I prefer the taste of Pettinince and its WAY cheaper than Satin Ice. Also - we can get Fondx, but its so expensive I haven't even othered trying it yet!

One other point - I do not fill my cakes with ganache for extra stability - I only cover them before adding fondant and its purely for a taste effect. I can get just as neat a corner using 100% fondant.

HTH!

lilmissbakesalot Posted 1 May 2011 , 6:02pm

Thanks everyone!! That is fondant covered SMBC.

Evior... I use Fondex exclusively and it's great. Much better than Satin Ice IMHO and I get absolutely no cracking at the edge with it.

Foxicakes Posted 1 May 2011 , 11:47pm

Thank you ALL for the help!! I will definitely give the ganache and the other fondants a go!! I already exclusively use very dense cakes as I prefer the texture and it's funny, most people that I introduce them to like them also! Don't get me wrong, I like a good ol American "light and fluffy" cake now and then, but usually with fruit and whipped cream. I also find that when you are serving a person a slice of cake that is 1 inch by 2 inches, they are MUCH more satisfied with a denser cake and don't feel the need to return for a second helping.
BTW, if anyone has additional opinions on Pettinice or Fondx, I would love to hear them. Especially if you have worked with the other commercial prepared fondants. Like I said before, I just don't "get" what it is about Fondarific being so "wonderful". To me it is quite difficult to work with, especially when it is warm outside. It just seems to almost melt. And, when you are adding a large amount of coloring to it, it just about falls apart and is a REAL PIA to work with!! ( I made a cake that was a royal purple and it would have been a nightmare had I not added some home made MMF to it as well as been during winter months!!) It did taste wonderful though...I will give it that!

Thanks again CC friends!

Rosie93095 Posted 2 Jul 2013 , 8:43pm

this has some awesome links!

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